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I use them in my 7/8ths inch thick, Betterbee, 10-frame boxes, which are a tad tighter inside than standard 3/4" equipment. That little 1/4 inch makes a difference in ease of frame removal.

When I first worked with my students' 8- frame equipment I as astounded at the "extra" room along the sides, as I had always assumed the boxes needed to be as tight as my 10-framers. Then one year I was a bit short of combs so I ran with a few boxes with 9 frames, and found it worked pretty well. (Not to mention the boxes are a bit lighter!)

I'm not talking about spacing combs out to fill in the difference. I just push all 9 together in the center. Sometimes I add a FB to take up some of the empty space, sometimes not. (Especially recently when I am fighting SHB.)

I use 9 frames both in the brood nest and also in my "supers" which are all deeps, too, as I am on a big comb-stock rebuilding kick as I get over my EFB issues in 2017.

Of all the reasons, though, the main one is the ease of handling frames when you have that extra room to work with. I also should point out that my standard minimum brood nest is three deeps, so even with 9 frames in each box, I'm still allotting 27 deep frames just for brood area. Because I am making brood combs, I take care that they don't get drawn out extra fat as one might if you were intending the 9 combs to be in 10 frame super.

If left undisturbed for long periods (no inspections for a month or more) I find the bees do draw out some bridge combs between the outermost faces of the frames and the side of the box. Usually this is pretty easy to deal with as I have one of those extra long hive tools. This is an issue when I am coming out winter, mostly, and toward the end of the summer/early fall. Depending on my bees' mood, I remove it or ignore it.

Nancy
 

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Sorry was unclear not talking honey supers but Broodnest here.
I doubt that many beeks would do that in a brood box. In fact, some try to squeeze in 11 frames. While I'm a rank amateur here and just the "assistant" to my lovely, I don't believe that increasing the space between frames would be beneficial in the brood cluster; quite the opposite. But I could be wrong about that...
 

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9 frames in the supers, 10 frames in the single bottom deep.

walt wright used 9 frames in his single bottom deeps. he said he did that so he could pull any frame out that he wanted to without disturbing the others.

i find it more difficult to remove a single frame in the 9 frame boxes because the frames get propolized in so much more.

i find it easier with the 10 frame boxes to remove the outside frame, and then pry apart and push the frames over to the side until i get to the one(s) i want to pull out.
 

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I’ve always used 9 frames in a 10 frame brood box. Combs are easier to remove. Never roll queens. Frames are spaced almost touching...with a bit of space at the sidewalls. Move outside frame over, remove second frame. I would never go back to 10 frames. And as far as adding another to make 11. Why? Doesn’t mean another frame of brood. With 9 in double deeps, you have 14 for brood. Plenty.
 

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I tried this for my supers and found the propolys between them and on the frame shelf a pain. mine filled the spaces with lots of propolys.
 

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Interesting subject and definitely different for brood or supers.

For the brood, two deeps, I have found that 9 in 10 in B1 makes removal much easier if you have a little 'shuffle' room to avoid what MP describes as 'queen rolling'. Since I am paranoid to do harm to my queens, this is important. In B2 I only run 8 since I have a frame feeder in all year, only being used in spring & after I remove the supers early in fall before I add syrup pails. (BTW, I now use the fully closed frame feeders with tube-type ladders and have third 3/4" hole drilled, plugged with a electrical box plug. I fill from here with a funnel, it reduced the drowned bee problem completely).

I don't use queen excluders, so my bees are free to go in to S1, if they like or need the room, but in the supers I run 8 frames evenly spaced, it seems the queen goes up here only if she has too, and it builds the honey out further, making uncapping very early.

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I’ve always used 9 frames in a 10 frame brood box. Combs are easier to remove. Never roll queens. Frames are spaced almost touching...with a bit of space at the sidewalls. Move outside frame over, remove second frame. I would never go back to 10 frames. And as far as adding another to make 11. Why? Doesn’t mean another frame of brood. With 9 in double deeps, you have 14 for brood. Plenty.
:

Same here, I didn't always use 9, but have for the last 15yrs or so.....as MP said, just easier on the bee and me...………...
 

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I totally agree with Enjambres reasoning but you can run into issues with the end frames. I primarily use 8 frame equipment and hate using the 10 frame boxes in part because they are so cramped. In the 10 frame boxes I have killed several queens trying to get those cramped frames out and back in but thanks to the extra room in the 8 frame boxes, I never have that I am aware of. I never considered using 9 frames for the 10 frame brood boxes but that is not a bad idea. It gives plenty of extra room to slide the end frame over so you are not rolling the bees to get the frame out or in. In my 3 and 5 frame boxes I found the same problem. Now, when I build my own, I give them a bit of extra room for moving the frames over when doing inspections. There might be local environmental issues that make having the empty space on the sides of the boxes an issue but I have not seen any in my location. I do get a bit of burr comb on the walls from time to time but that is easy enough to scrape off during an inspection. One issue that does happen with the extra space in 8 frame boxes that might be a major problem in a 10 frame box with 9 frames only is that I often see extra deep comb created on the end frames. Those frames cannot be moved anywhere else in the box except the end spot because the comb sticks out so far. Eventually, the comb sticks out so far that the extra space you were enjoying is taken up by the enlarged comb. If I were a commercial operator with hundreds or thousands of hives it would be intolerable but with the 10-15 hives I usually keep, I can work around it.

No matter what size box you are using, you do not want to spread out the frames in the brood boxes. They need to be pushed up against each other very tightly so the edges of the frames are touching each other.
 

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I tried 9 in the brood box, it was not worth the burr comb, propolis, fat end comb hassles.
10 in a 10 brood box for me, but 9 or 8 in a 10 super I do use.
 

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First job I had we ran 35 mm end bars, and 9 frames in the double deep brood nests. We centralised the frames when finishing working the box so there would be a small gap each side of the box, so next time we could stick a hive tool in and seperate frames widely before pulling the first one out. The end bars were propolised also so the real centre to centre gap was a bit over 35 mm. The boss told me this was all the frames a queen could keep up with so no point running 10 anyway. We had very few issues with swarming.

Everybody I have worked for since has run 10 frames per box, and swarming has always been a much bigger issue. I don't know if that is coincidence.
 

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A. I. Root, in his later years, made the statement that if he could go back in time and change anything about the Improved Hoffman Frame that he promoted and manufactured for the brood combs, it would be to change the 1.375 inch spacing to 1.500.
 

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"For those of you that use 9 frames in a 10 frame box,do you mind sharing why you use that configuration? "

Clayton my guess is that the longer you keep bees questions like this will answer themselves for you as you manipulate more colonies and experiment with different sets up with your equipment. 9 frames in a 10 frame brood box is very common with commercial beekeeping. The majority of my deep brood boxes here are 9 frames instead of 10. When we ran our commercial business back in Virginia 25 years ago they were all 9 frame setups for brood. As mentioned the extra room comes in handy pulling frames for inspection. Once your equipment ages and your brood frames collect more propolis at the end bars, you'll find that 9 frames will fill up a 10 frame box rather easily.
 

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I’ve always used 9 frames in a 10 frame brood box. Combs are easier to remove. Never roll queens. Frames are spaced almost touching...with a bit of space at the sidewalls. Move outside frame over, remove second frame. I would never go back to 10 frames. And as far as adding another to make 11. Why? Doesn’t mean another frame of brood. With 9 in double deeps, you have 14 for brood. Plenty.
And we learn something new every day...I hadn't heard that before, Michael.
 

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The important thing is to space the brood nest frames tightly together. If I leave a side space, my bees will fill it with a comb attached to the wall. Hence the advantage of 9 frames is lost.
I've never had a problem breaking 1 frame of the 10 loose in order to easily access the rest. Usually its the first or second comb on the outside that is easiest to remove.
 

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I would think that is another location, location, location difference. We have a dribble flow year round here, sometimes heavy eucalyptus in the winter. Even close spaced frames get all braced together. Nine frame brood spacing would be even more of a brace nightmare.

 
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