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I'll be interested to see what some of the experienced beeks say here. I'm thinking about going that route next year. I find inspecting a 10/10 stressful, when it comes to putting that last frame back in especially. It's packed, and I worry about rolling a queen by accident. I inspect less than I should because of this.
 

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9 frames in a 10 frame brood chamber is not a good idea bees will fill with extra comb anywhere there is more than a bee space. I have 10 frames in a 10 frame brood box and 5 frames in a five frame nuc. My approach to not roll a queen is to start from the outside, smoking the outside frame i am removing and this drives most of the bees off that frame to the others. frame then removed and the rest can then be inspected.


Now one can do this with a honey super with drawn comb in it the bees will lengthen the cells when they are filling with honey. Does make uncapping easier as there are no shallow cells that the uncapping knife wont reach
 

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Many people love them, but I hate them. I have a few deeps that I inherited, that have the nine frame brackets. I wouldn't have done that on my own. The frames are overfilled and odd shaped, cannot use the drawn frames in my regular 10 frame boxes.

I am always afraid that I am going to roll the queen. Because it is a spacing bracket, you cannot just open some space by pulling a frame and then sliding the frames away from the each other. You have to pull them up so they clear the bracket before moving them away from the frame next to it with plenty of opportunity to roll some bees.

I keep thinking one day, i will trim them down and pull out all the brackets.
 

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I have lot`s of them, but am trying to get away from them in my deeps makes a big hassel out of trying to swap frames around. in my med`s that are strictly honey supers they are ok.
 

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9's are all we use. More efficient in the extracting room, fewer frames to handle and the uncapper doesn't miss much.
 

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I have 9 frames in most of my 10 frame supers. I follow Mel's OTS method for splits and I like having just a little more space to move frames of queen cells around without risk of damaging them. Just a preference that works well for the way I keep my bees and doesn't seem to cause any problems except the loss of a frame of comb in each deep.
 

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I purchased a nuc this year that was made with these frames. I hate it! The bees will not conform to normal comb building. Every time I go in I have to cut out bur comb. I have to pry frames apart between boxes. I will try getting them through the winter and scrapping those frames next spring or burn them.
 

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I run 10 in brood boxes for maximum brood and easier inspecting but 9 in honey supers. Almost no frame scratching after going through uncapper. 9 frame also gets us that extra wax from each frame.
 

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This is only my second year with beehives. I don't remember where I heard about this hive configuration but it is working very well in my yard.
I have ten frame medium boxes using only eight frames pushed together in the middle (no spaces) and then follower boards on the outsides. This gives about a 1 inch ventilation shaft going up the whole hive. I have never seen any bees in that area, so there is no burr comb.
The plus side for me is the extra room when I go into the hive, no queen rolling or squished bees. I like to think the plus side for the bees is a cooler happier hive.
 

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Many people love them, but I hate them. I have a few deeps that I inherited, that have the nine frame brackets. I wouldn't have done that on my own. The frames are overfilled and odd shaped, cannot use the drawn frames in my regular 10 frame boxes.

I am always afraid that I am going to roll the queen. Because it is a spacing bracket, you cannot just open some space by pulling a frame and then sliding the frames away from the each other. You have to pull them up so they clear the bracket before moving them away from the frame next to it with plenty of opportunity to roll some bees.

I keep thinking one day, i will trim them down and pull out all the brackets.
I bought 200 supers from my wifes grandefather. They all had built in frame spacers. Not anymore! I tried them on 2 or 3 hives before deciding that they had to go. It was a shame, as they were clearly alot of time and money to install, but there isnt a worse gadget in beekeeping if you ask me. I run 10 frames while drawing 5 or more frames of foundation in honey supers, and always 10 frames in the brood nest. 9 in honey supers when not drawing foundation.
Luke
 

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Any thoughts on the merits of using only 9 frames vs. 10?
Brood box or honey super? Start off w/ ten frames of foundation and in supers intended for honey production, once combs are drawn, run nine in those supers and the combs will be drawn deeper. Theoretically you will actually average more honey per super if you run 9 frames in a 10 frame honey super. Often, when 10 frames or used in a honey super, the outside sides of the outside combs don't get filled. In effect the same as running 9 frames. Only the combs aren't as deep, so not as much honey per super.

Ten frames in the brood chamber is best. One more comb for the queen to lay in. One more comb of honey to winter on.
 

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I use 9's in the honey supers, but I have a frame spacer that I use to space the frames after inspection. I received some of the permanent spacers from a beek supply house by accident. They even look scary.
 

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I always run 10 frames in deeps for brood chambers. I use shallows for suppers and if I am starting with foundation I put in 10 frames. Once the frames have been drawn I then run 9 frames. It is so much easier to uncap.
 

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I went to 9 in a 10 frame box this year and have had no problem with burr comb. I do not use spacers; I just push the frames to one side. I did it so that I'd have more room when looking through frames. I like it.
 

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ddb123.....I do the same thing. I use Mel's OTS method for hive splits and the extra space to move frames with queen cells on them is helpful. It just works well to be able to move that outside frame away from the other ones without risk of damaging any active cells. It fits perfectly in my situation and way of handling my hives.
 

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I use nine frames in 10 frame boxes all the time, brood boxes and supers. Works great, if you know what you want and what you do. It helps you to work faster with less danger of killing bees and queens. You need to arrange the frames so they build less burr comb. Anyway burr comb adds to your wax supply. Wax is not cheap these days.
 

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I use nine frames in 10 frame boxes all the time, brood boxes and supers. Works great, if you know what you want and what you do. It helps you to work faster with less danger of killing bees and queens.
I do the same....so what if there is one less frame in the brood box, there are two brood boxes! So much easier to work... I do use the frame spacers, but only on ONE side.........it just makes it easier and you can push the frames together on that one side if you wish....works for me..

Also, as many have said........when using 9 frames in supers, it its soooo much easier to ...do most everything.......
 

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9's are all we use. More efficient in the extracting room, fewer frames to handle and the uncapper doesn't miss much.
Seems like I hear quite frequently on here that 10 frames is a requirement for drawing foundation. We use 9 for all extracting supers and checkerboard what foundation we are drawing in either a 2,4,6,8 or 3,5,7 configuration. Fat drawn combs and skinny foundation? Yes, that can happen but in my experience it's the exception and not the rule and is rarely more than a minor inconvenience. Here is a video of our uncapper doing a couple of boxes of 3,5,7's. I had to work 1 handed, apologies for the camerawork. The new comb does tend to tear a bit and there is an occasional area of cappings that get missed but by and large the foundation runs through much like the neighboring drawn comb.
http://youtu.be/kbY9JibjzsE
 
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