Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know I am probably going to take some criticism here, but I wanted to share my most recent hive inspection experience.

I am bee learning in my second year. It has been a challenging year with numerous swarms, and figuring out the best way to manage these prosperous girls. I did put supers on early, but they were brand new supers with new frames and foundation, and the bees had no interest in working them into their lifestyle. I still think they preferred swarming, over working their way through the queen excluder.

Upon inspecting one of my hives today, I found several supercedure cells in the upper, ten frame deep. My first thought was to pinch them off. As I took a closer look, I noticed that the queens were on the verge of emerging from these cells. I managed to successfully release and capture six virgin queens. So by happenstance, I have reared my first round of queens.... now what do I do with them??

I found a seventh queen walking about a center frame in the lower deep. There were no eggs, or larvae and minimal capped brood in this hive. I left the queen that was in the lower deep, with the hope that she will start laying soon.
As for the original queen, I did not locate her

I have gone from three hives to five, plus a nuc. At this time, I have no budget left to add more hives. I think I found someone that would like to have the queens, so they will not go to waste.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
If you had the support resources (bees and frames) these would be great for nucs. I made four up from queen cells I found in a swarmy hive two weeks ago. Already have two laying queens (other two queens are currently AWOL). Wouldn't take much to turn your queens into hives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
I know I am probably going to take some criticism here, but I wanted to share my most recent hive inspection experience.

I am bee learning in my second year. It has been a challenging year with numerous swarms, and figuring out the best way to manage these prosperous girls. I did put supers on early, but they were brand new supers with new frames and foundation, and the bees had no interest in working them into their lifestyle. I still think they preferred swarming, over working their way through the queen excluder.

Upon inspecting one of my hives today, I found several supercedure cells in the upper, ten frame deep. My first thought was to pinch them off. As I took a closer look, I noticed that the queens were on the verge of emerging from these cells. I managed to successfully release and capture six virgin queens. So by happenstance, I have reared my first round of queens.... now what do I do with them??

I found a seventh queen walking about a center frame in the lower deep. There were no eggs, or larvae and minimal capped brood in this hive. I left the queen that was in the lower deep, with the hope that she will start laying soon.
As for the original queen, I did not locate her

I have gone from three hives to five, plus a nuc. At this time, I have no budget left to add more hives. I think I found someone that would like to have the queens, so they will not go to waste.
It's amazing isn't it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I am in need of a new queen for a hive I took out of a house today. I would be interested in one queen. If you have intrest in moving them send me a private message. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The queens have all been spoken for. I was able to pull some equipment together to keep one. The rest were given to a mentor that has worked with me. She had good homes for the rest of them!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top