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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone
I have overgrown mixing syrup in a bucket, I have purchased a 55gal water container and would like to mix my syrup in that. Like to hear about the methods used for this. Currently I own a electric hand mixer (used in construction industry for mixing cement in 5gal buckets) I would think this is somewhat underpower for a 55 gal. Any ideas please let me know.
Thanks
DP
Connecticut
 

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There is a post here describing the use of a sump pump set up in a barrel to either recirculate (mix) or diverted to pump out to containers. I made a mental note of that one.
 

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Electric boat motor.
 

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2x4 for thin syrup; mount the drum on cinder blocks and build a fire underneath for heavy syrup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Crofter: I don't seem to be able to find the article! sum pump appears to be the preferred method on youtube for mixing. I do own an Electric motor, I am wondering if that has an advantage over sum pump? other than I don't own a sum pump. it is little too heavy to insert in the drum and take out!
 

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The electric trolling motor would do the mixing but not the pump off feature. You could dip or set up with a drain valve something like a honey gate. Tractor Supply stores in Canada and probably the US as well, have a good assortment of bulkhead connectors and all manner of threaded and quick connect fittings for the crop spraying and irrigation service if you go the pump route.

I cant remember if the article was on here or another forum.
 

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I'm using a sump pump (the type with the motor up above on a shaft, not submersible). This pumps from below into a vertical PVC pipe, to a tee with a hose bibb, then up to a 90. It is then horizontal and there is a ball valve inline before it gets to another 90 that turns the direction vertically down into the barrel again. At the bottom of the barrel I put another 90 and that is the exit. It's essentially a loop that is open down at the bottom of the barrel where the pump intake and the pipe exit are. I use the hose bibb and ball valve to fill buckets quickly. I use hot water straight from a standard hot water heater and add the correct amount of sugar for my mix while the pump is running. It takes about half hour of less to do 2 to 1, and less time for 1 to 1.

I used a submersible sump pump originally with this setup, but the thermal cutoff switch would shut it off after 5 min because of the hot water. The elevated pump solves that problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
rkereid: your pump still in the tank or outside. if still in the tank and you fill the tank to 55gal it most submerge in hot water, no?
 

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rkereid: your pump still in the tank or outside. if still in the tank and you fill the tank to 55gal it most submerge in hot water, no?
To clarify, I'm using an approx. 40 gal plastic pickle barrel, so yes it is not as deep as a 55 gal drum. The motor is above the liquid in this setup. I imagine that you could still use a 55 gal drum and elevate the pump so the pickup is above the bottom of the drum. The outlet on the other end of the pipe would still be run down to the bottom, and it should work fine since that's what agitates the mix. The solid granules would be stirred up keeping them from settling on the bottom.

Merry Christmas, and Cheers!
 

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Deepster - if you are using plain sugar, heat the water to 120 degrees F and your construction mixer (the elongated "half eggbeater, half propeller" type) should have it dissolved in about 5 minutes.

If you are adding HBH, call the company ans ask for their instructions regarding temperature.

I like Crofter's idea about the trolling motor :)

BTW, it is near freezing in some areas now, so I would NOT be feeding liquid feed at this time. - Best of luck.
 

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Deepster, it takes maybe 3 minutes, if that long. This is with a battery operated drill that doesn't much care for the torque required to mix at a high speed setting, so it's mostly at a fairly low speed.
Kind of amazed seeing people talking about needing to recirculate for an hour or so when they have that type of a setup.
But like I said, I haven't generally done real heavy syrup. Maybe a 2:1 mixture by weight would require heating the water.
Also I generally wind up only using about half the available volume. On my biggest feedings this year I've poured in 18 gallons of water and 6 25 lb bags of sugar (3 gallons of water is real close to 25 lbs). Makes about 25 gallons of sugar water (hard to know precisely because I'm using 2 gallon feeders and filling them up about half way).
But I don't think doubling the amount in a batch is going to affect the time much. Most of the dissolving seems to happen just by the agitation of pouring the sugar into the water. I think much of the 3 minutes I spend mixing is out of paranoia that it's not done yet.
 

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physicsdudereturns: The whole story is mixing 2 to 1. One to one mixes real easy.
Yep! It may not be exactly so but I would say 2 to 1 is three times harder to totally dissolve than 1 to 1! Heating saves a lot of stirring. With 2 to 1 it is important to get total solution otherwise it may crystallize to some extent which plugs small hole type feeders; not so much a problem with tub type feeders.

I mix something a bit thinner than true 2 to 1. 5 to 3 is more practical for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Also I use warm water only for 2 to 1, using hot water in making 2 to 1 will give you the impression of dissolving but once cooled it will crystalize as crofter mentioned, mixing is the key in making 2 to 1. that is why I like to set up my new system with least amount of effort, for next season.
 
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