Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
What kind of tank do you use a spatula on? I use a spatula to get the last of the honey out of my buckets, but I don't do the same w/ my bottling tanks. So what kind of tanks do you have?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What kind of tank do you use a spatula on? I use a spatula to get the last of the honey out of my buckets, but I don't do the same w/ my bottling tanks. So what kind of tanks do you have?
Sorry, I meant out of my extractor/large buckets.... not tanks. Long day yesterday. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Do you get enough honey out of your extractor doing that to make doing so that worth while? I can see doing so w/ buckets, since I just did so w/ 8 buckets in the last 4 hours. But I don't see the walls of an extractor holding that much honey. Just curious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,295 Posts
Mark... My, Kelly 9 frame radial extractor , has a raised bottom toward the center, and, there is perhaps a quart of honey left in this void unless I tip the extractor. I will not unbuckle the extractor, (bolted to the floor) for a quart of honey, but, when lots of folks who come here to extract their honey, they want every last drop, and, a spatula is better than unbuckling the extractor and tipping it toward the gate.

Not sure why Angel wants the long handle spatula.

cchoganjr
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
5,284 Posts
But I don't see the walls of an extractor holding that much honey.
Mark, it's not the walls that hold the honey, it's the bottom of the extractor. Using the spatula to move it all towards and out the gate, I get about another quart.......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Correct, the bottom is concave/convex in shape and around the rim I can get down in there with a regular spatula, but with 40" I don't get honey all over me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
I use the same spatula for my Dadant 20 frame extractor and find it comes in very handy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Mark... My, Kelly 9 frame radial extractor , has a raised bottom toward the center, and, there is perhaps a quart of honey left in this void unless I tip the extractor. I will not unbuckle the extractor, (bolted to the floor) for a quart of honey, but, when lots of folks who come here to extract their honey, they want every last drop, and, a spatula is better than unbuckling the extractor and tipping it toward the gate.

Not sure why Angel wants the long handle spatula.

cchoganjr
That makes sense. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,092 Posts
>. I will not unbuckle the extractor, (bolted to the floor) for a quart of honey, but, when lots of folks who come here to extract their honey, they want every last drop,

I also extract a lot of small crops each year and want to drain things quickly. My spinner is easy to push the honey through with a scrapper, but for the extractor I needed one of my brilliant inventions. The stand is bolted to the floor but has hinged floor the extractor is bolted to. Two toolbox type clamps hold down the end opposite the hinge. We just open the clamps, tip up the extractor and put a 4X4 under the board it is bolted too. Once again, I give this invention to the beekeeping world with no patents or copyrights, just from the generosity of my heart. You can see the piano hinge in this picture:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,092 Posts
The AtlantaFixture add showed up on the top of my Beesource page as a targeted add as soon as I looked at the site in post #1.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
Once again, I give this invention to the beekeeping world with no patents or copyrights, just from the generosity of my heart. You can see the piano hinge in this picture:

You better start emptying that sump tank soon, before it overflows. I hope there is an exit pipe w/ a pump attached to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,092 Posts
>I hope there is an exit pipe w/ a pump attached to it.

Yes there is, you can see the gate valve and a bit of the pump to the right of the tank. That is honey on top of two stainless screens. This is a 1950's? setup that works well enough on unheated honey, that I got in 1976. It actually belongs to another beekeeper who fell off the end of the earth in the mid 1980's.
Herb Fields, where are you?
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top