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And this is my first experience with bees. Early on I was concerned that the package was dying - not a lot of traffic at the entrance. Bee's were coming and going at a rate of about 1 per second. And I'm of the philosophy of not opening the hive much, so other than removing the queen cage early on, I have not inspected the hive (a modified Warre design).

So today I'm observing the hive and the traffic is down right impressive. So many bee's coming and going that they have to wait their turn. So many bee's in the air that it's a bit intimidating for a newbee sitting 2 feet away with no protection - but I'm getting used to doing that.

While I've not confirmed eggs or brood - it makes sense that now would be when some of the first eggs were were becoming adult bees and the population would begin to grow for the first time. Anyway - only 2 more weeks and it'll be six weeks since install. If I still have a good population by then, then I know I'm good.
 

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When I started we were told to wait 10 days after the queen was released to check. I had a hard time waiting. Then it was max once a week so I could get to know how the hive got on. It might have been better to delay more but I had a hard time waiting the week for the first year. Even now I have to stop myself from opening the hives up each week, now I have five. I don't know how you can stay out! I think everyone would agree that the bees probably are happier you don't go in.
 

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I don't know how you can stay out!
It's not easy, but I've just decided that viewing the entrance will have to be good enough. I've seen some pretty cool things just sitting there patiently. When I make my next hive, I'm definitely going to put in a window so I can see their progress on comb building.

I still have to add one more box to my hive. Being a warre type of hive, I will add it at the bottom - so I still won't get much of a peek.
 

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But then again if you dont inspect frequently on a new packaged hive you can run into a mess, specially if the colony needed a replacement queen right away! Everyday that goes by without a queen is alot of eggs that could of been laid!!! But sometimes your lucky and things works out like they are suppose to. That never happens with me!...HAHAHA Good Luck with your Bees and i hope they make lots of honey!! :D

Make yourself a Observation Top Bar Hive, you will be able to see everything from the window! I have a picture on my profile of my Observation Top Bar Hive, I have several pics of the perfectly drawn comb also but dont know how to put them on here with this kind of attachment set up!
 

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Make yourself a Observation Top Bar Hive, you will be able to see everything from the window! I have a picture on my profile of my Observation Top Bar Hive
I will be making a top bar hive with observation window. I have to do everything my own way, so I'm working out a modified design in sketchup. I want a hive that has taller comb - but shorter bars.

I've noticed that a lot of people with TBH's complain that the bee's bend the comb at the end and many have the comb collapse in the heat of summer. So I'm hoping shorter bars will help in that area. Also, If your design forces the bees to make their comb taller than wide, then they orient the comb hexagon a different way - and this is important for varroa control.

If the comb is wider than tall, then the bees build their comb so that the point of a hexagon is at the bottom of the cell. This gives them the proper structural integrity for a wide comb. If the comb is taller than wide, then the bottom of the cell is flat. If the bottom of the cell is flat, it is more difficult for varroa to hide from the bees that clean the cells.

Another advantage is that a more narrow comb will allow the bee's to generate more heat in a cluster that can almost reach the hive walls. If a hive gets a bad varroa infection, then they can cluster to generate excess heat, which causes the varroa to fall off. It's just like when we get an infection, our body generates a fever to kill the infection. So for all those reasons I'm building it that way.

I'm totally new, so I may be on a fools errand. But no matter the case, I'll learn something.
 

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Well i hope you find the proper structural bee space and dimensions that your looking for and i hope the bees will be happy with their new condo! Yeah im sure you will learn! :lpf:
 

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Make yourself a Observation Top Bar Hive, you will be able to see everything from the window! I have a picture on my profile of my Observation Top Bar Hive, I have several pics of the perfectly drawn comb also but dont know how to put them on here with this kind of attachment set up!
What do you use for the glass? Attached inside or outside the hive body? Do the bees ever try to cover it up?

I've been noodling a way to make some observation slots in the lower part of brood boxes. Better than tipping up to check for Qcells on the bottom.
 

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Paulding COunty Beek....whoohooo...listen, every beek will tell you different things for different folks and oddly, i am no different.....LOL..Ok but seriously, aska beek, get an answer, ask 10 beeks, get 10 answers. I was in mine once every couple of days for a VERY long time. Thats how i learned and sometimes continue to learn. I was very careful to move slowly and not disrupt too much. Its different strokes kinda deal. One day they can be fine, the next...nope. Mine HB themselves within 2 days as i was "leaving them alone". Food for thought. I may be the odd man out, but i learn by reading, but i learn a LOT more by getting into the hives. Has it hurt my production....maybe...maybe not. I would think the splits hurt them worse....LOL.
 

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Paulding COunty Beek....whoohooo...listen, every beek will tell you different things for different folks and oddly, i am no different.....LOL..Ok but seriously, aska beek, get an answer, ask 10 beeks, get 10 answers.
Thanks for the advice - and I know you are right. In the end we're all guessing at what is best. Some have to default to a management method that produces maximum honey because the bees are their life blood. But since that is not my focus, I have the freedom to do it any way I like and just see what happens. If my bees make 0 lbs of honey - fine. If they die, I won't say that is fine, but I won't lose my house over it. I'll just buy more bees.

Not to start a debate, but I think it is a good idea to not treat at all, and let the chips fall where they may - which will lead to lots of dead hives, but those that survive have the genetics (or maybe a bit of luck) that we all need.

So I'm just one of the 10 beeks with a different opinion. I only wish I had a certificate to validate it! :D Just joking, I think being a master beek would be cool and useful. More knowledge is always good. And there's nothing wrong with providing proof (a certificate) that this person is highly educated about beekeeping.
 

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I think the hardest thing about beginning as a beek is learning that there really aren't hard fast rules. What works well for this person in the state may not work at all for someone in another part of the country. Or what worked last year might not work the next.
Once I got a handle on the zen of doing what I thought sounded right and not freaking over the mistakes (yesterday I flipped a super upside down on to the hive. I'd set it down on it's side and didn't check closely enough when I put it back) the bees seem to be surviving me just fine.
 

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I hear ya Key, I am not treating either. I am going to switch over from solid to screen BB's though.....MHI's are pretty hygenic..lol. They are washboarding the heck outta that hive.
 
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