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I am harvesting honey for the first time. I'm crushing and straining the honeycomb through two Weber, 22" stainless steel grates (perpendicular to each other) then into a Rubbermade plastic container with a plastic tray with 1/4 holes which sits 6" above the bottom of the same tray (2 tiers). The honey from this container then pours into two stainless steel strainers which sits above a 5 gl. food grade bucket. I want to finally take the honey through a nylon filter as opposed to cheese cloth. Is a 200 MICRON filter to fine?
 

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I think 200 micron should be just fine, if you are bottling it for sale you may want to go smaller maybe 400 micron just to make sure it is nice and clear. John
 

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It sure is taking a long time for the honey to go through. I'm glad to know this isn't too fine. Thanks so much jmgi.
 

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Straining goes much quicker if the honey is close to 90-95 degrees, at room temperature the viscosity of honey decreases substantially from the higher temps. John
 

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The 200 micron is the size of the mesh opening so it is finer, If it were 200 mesh that is the number of openings per sq. in. then it would be more coarse. The 200 micron will do fine.
 

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Jack, it seems like overkill in your straining method. Sherwin Williams paint stores sell a mesh paint strainer that fits on a bucket. Just crush the comb and put in the strainer. I don't know the mesh size, but the honey comes out clear and clean. The strainers are relatively cheap, and are washable and reusable.
 

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200 micron will get the honey real clear with no visible specks of anything in it, however, it needs to be warmed up quite high to get it to flow through quickly, like around 130 or so, and some people don't like to heat their honey that high if at all.
 

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I've had better luck with the fine filters if I soak them in water before I try to strain the honey. Much below 85 degrees and it won't move well at all. you can help by putting a clean glass plate on the top of your bucket.
 

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Yeah at normal room temp 200 is too small in my opinion. I use the 600 micron for most everything.

If I feel the need to go smaller, then I gotta get the honey warmed up some.
 

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Back when I was a kid and doing this and didn't know any better I had excellent results straining honey with panty hose. I'm not sure but I think I used L'eggs. They came in a little egg. They are somewhat cheap, very fine mesh, and you can toss them when done.
 

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I use 400 with no problems, unless you are in a honey competition :D I got 20 out of 25 pts for clarity last night at our club comp. ..... Still had a little pollen in my honey......just the way my customers like it.
 

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The largest pollen particles run 250 micron (and they are unlikely to appear in honey). Filtering at 200 micron takes forever. 400 micron works well and it works better if you run 600 micron in front of it to catch the biggest chunks of wax.
 

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There is definitely confusion here about micron sizing and mesh sizing relationship. Have a look at this link http://www.showmegold.org/news/Mesh.htm In simple words one system is bigger numbers smaller holes; the other naming system is bigger numbers, bigger holes.

I have a couple of sets of three plastic bucket filters and they are mislabeled as to fineness. They are from a major bee supply company. The finest is probably equivalent to a 600 (mesh to the inch) but is labeled 600microns! It does indeed plug quickly and must be reverse flushed to get the wax crystals off. The medium one at least is labeled with the 400 number but they should call it mesh not microns and that is the coarsest I would consider for my market. The bottles will collect quite a skim of wax on top after bottling that may be objectionable to some if they consider it scum instead of wax and pollen. With two sets of filters you can swap a fresh one in while the other drains and gets cleaned.
 

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I'll chime in for the paint strainer bags. I have the supertuff 11513 5 gal I picked up in a 2 pk at the local hardware store for reasonable. If'n I were bux up I'd buy a box of 24 from amazon to have on hand for all your straining needs. They are a very tough nylon, take care of 'em and they'll last a long time. Folks use 'em to strain out their mash when brewing, also. All of the bucket strainers (round plastic with mesh) seem inordinately expensive. Just make sure you use a cinch strap or something to hold 'em up from the bottom of the bucket, the elastic on 'em is fairly useless if you get any weight in 'em.
 
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