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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do bees manage to keep a queen cell warmed to the needed 94-5 degreesF in a nuc where only two frames have been placed, including one with queen cell(s)? I'm very curious. I 've read that capped brood emits heat, so maybe that's some help. It seems like the odds of chilling a queen cell are high when you pull it and place it in a two-four frame nuc. Yet I've been successful with this so far - two viable queens produced this year. Those were four frame nucs. Not so sure about 2 frames.
 

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How do bees manage to keep a queen cell warmed to the needed 94-5 degreesF in a nuc where only two frames have been placed, including one with queen cell(s)? I'm very curious. I 've read that capped brood emits heat, so maybe that's some help. It seems like the odds of chilling a queen cell are high when you pull it and place it in a two-four frame nuc. Yet I've been successful with this so far - two viable queens produced this year. Those were four frame nucs. Not so sure about 2 frames.
The outside temp is right now as about 80-90-100F daily in OH.
Keeping things warm is not a big problem and requires no/minimal effort.
If anything, it is keeping the things cool and moist is the real effort - hence these small nucs should be kept in shade.
Very small nucs can easily maintain queen cells this time a year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I understand daytime temps, but nights still get down into the 70s and even 60s occasionally. I wish I could observe what goes on inside hives - so many questions! On another but related topic: any idea how long a single frame witha capped queen cell can sit in another box separate from its parent hive and not adversely affect the developing queen? This would be with nurse bees still on the frame.
 

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I understand daytime temps, but nights still get down into the 70s and even 60s occasionally. I wish I could observe what goes on inside hives - so many questions! On another but related topic: any idea how long a single frame witha capped queen cell can sit in another box separate from its parent hive and not adversely affect the developing queen? This would be with nurse bees still on the frame.
As long as your equipment is insulated well - the 60-70s at night is not a big deal (what is a chance of that in July?) - hence the small mating nucs are customarily made from foam.
As long as you can provide the reasonable temps - the QC will sit for as long as it is needed.
Insulate the box; sandwich the frame with insulated inserts; provide food/water; keep in shade and don't worry too much.

It is summer.
 

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Much depends on your locality. It's summer here and 85F right now. But when I got up this morning, it was 52F. Not an unusual occurrence in the mountains. Insulation would alleviate chilling the QC . J
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Karen, also remember that you move a queen cell to a mating nuc just a day or two before emergence. At this point some minor temperature fluctuations will not affect her development. A two frame nuc ala David at Barnyard Bees will do fine in the late spring and into summer if there are two full frames of bees in it. The insulated styrofoam minis do fine with just a cup of bees, but there should be no other brood in those without more bees. Weather can always throw you a curve ball. I have been in both IL and WI in the summer and seen killing frosts, but those events are not typical.
 
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