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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all ! 1 st year beek here since june 1 .I have a ? about my hive situation .I bought a hive in june ,,1 deep 10 frame loaded bees ,Queen ,brood ,. The beek I bought from said put second deep on asap as brood hatching soon.So I did that with 10 frame (1 old comb rest plastic foundation), they filled by july 12 so I put on med super ,took them awile to get up there but they are filling in 1 old and building on a few frame of wax .Now I got in there and was looking and discovered that they did not put any brood on 2nd deep but all capped honey except for asmall 1/2 moon of brood on the one old comb .I'm guessing this was you called honey bound so in all my wisdom (HA!) I removed 4 frames and replaced with empty.Now I'm second guessing my action . Could someone reassure me of the mistakes I made or not.My bees seem uninterupted by my decision and are rebuilding these combs fairly fast .By the way these are supposed to be Italians & I have alot of wild flowers around & soybean fields ,,Thanks for reading and possible ideas ,Chad
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
med is progressing but at a much slower rate than they filling in the deep .Do you think they will start making some brood in the frames i replaced or they just do what they want to do I guess
 

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Once you have plenty of empty comb, especially if you manage in order to produce it, or if you purchase it, you can give the bees empty comb so they can more efficiently harvest nectar and process it into honey. Bees don't ordinarily collect honey, they collect nectar, and one of the main things the bees need to do with nectar before it becomes honey, is to remove the extra moisture in the nectar. It is easier for them to turn nectar into honey, with higher temperatures, lower ambient humidity levels, and by spreading it out in thinner layers; all of these things help the bees to process more nectar into honey, and more quickly, freeing up foragers and space to collect even more nectar, then process it into honey. It can still happen with foundation or foundationless, but some nectar/honey is sacrificed to produce the comb, and while comb is being built by nurse bees - honey production can suffer, the bees do not necessarily build extra comb to improve the efficiency of their honey production, but only as they need it. The beekeeper can help the bees to take better advantage of nectar flows by providing this extra comb space, and how efficient this can be depends on many variables.

It sounds like you did very well for your first beekeeping experience, and you are well on your way to developing your own beekeeping style.
 

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Chad, I agree with the others. Things sound good. By removing four frames you gave them space - a safety valve. If I am reading your post right you seem worried that they didn't put bees in the deep above the initial box. Don't worry they will do that in the spring as they move up the hive eating stores as they go. I think your post said you got the hive in June. June and July in the midwest are peak honey months, so putting honey up there is exactly what they are supposed to do. It sounds like you bought a good hive. Relax and enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
everyone thanks for your replies ...Ive been reading alot on here since last year ,trying to prepair.I,ve wanted to raise bees since I was 10-12 and now 30 years later I,ve begun .although it would have been nice to start way back then I think now a days with the web its fantastic...Thanks again for your input .Chad
 
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