Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Approaching the end of my first year I have three highs, and thousands of questions.

14 days ago, they landed in my tree. [See photo 1]. Quite frankly I don't know if they are my bees or not. Of my three hives I noticed no significant loss. Because the slope up to the tree is so steep they are about 30 feet off the ground. They are positioned about 15 feet horizontal from my dining room balcony. For me, they are essentially unreachable. I watch them for a few days, assuming they would find new digs. They did not. I watch them for a few more days and their numbers seem to be declining. I thought to myself well, if they don't find something pretty soon they're going to die. So I set up a hive [see photo to]. The upper deep has 12 frames with only a very small amount of old comb. Mostly Plasticell. The lower box is completely empty. For a day or two they were checking out the hive and then they seemed to lose interest. By this time we were at eight or nine days. The wife suggested I try a little syrup, therefore the entrance feeder. They ignored it for two or three days then began feeding like crazy. Nevertheless, they have not taken up residence in the hive. Today is 14 days.

What in the world is happening? Their numbers seemed to decline for a while and then seemed to increase. It may just be there were out looking for new digs that day, and I assume their numbers have declined. My experience is that these little beauties are dying every day. What is likely to happen???

Curt.
Pasadena, California





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,239 Posts
if you can get a rope over a limb, you can put a frame of brood in a 5 gal. bucket with a lid and an entrance hole and pull it up to them. that usually works-if they havent started making comb on the limb. if you cant throw a rope over a limb, try using a fishing rod and cast a weight over it and pull the rope over. my guess is they have comb and will likely not leave it.
good luck,mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Man, you sure have done all you can to lure them into the hive body. I like Mike's idea alot. However, those bees building comb on the underside of that branch would surely explain why they haven't left it. Please let us know how it goes.
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,108 Posts
14 days ago a little lemograss oil in a hive and you probably would get them to move in. Now they probably have built comb in the tree so you'll probably have to cut the limb, shake the bees into the hive and remove the comb unless you can get some pieces big enough (probably not because there will be limbs running through it) to tie into frames. And the question is, is it worth risking falling off the ladder... imo, it's not worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Mike,
now that's an exotic idea. I'm definitely going to think on that and see if I can't make it work. Thanks for your input.

I used lemongrass oil initially. I just forgot to mention in my initial post.

Walt,
I'll see you this evening. Thanks.



Thanks for the input. This is a valuable resource.
Curt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,239 Posts
"...Thanks for the input. This is a valuable resource..."
most of what little i know came from other beekeepers, so i cant take credit. glad i could help and glad to have this resource too-keeps me outa trouble while i convalese.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top