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I assumed 16oz of honey was a pound as well but because of its density 12oz made a pound. Just what I was told
 

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The first responce was both direct and correct. A 12 oz honey bear is sold to hold 12 oz of honey by weight. A one pound bottle holds 16 oz of honey by weight or one pound which by chance is just about 12 fluid ounces.
 

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I think the confusion comes from 12 fluid ounces usually equals 16 ozs (in weight measurements) or 1 lb of honey. So when we talk about containers holding honey, are we talking fluid ounces or weight ounces?

Like others said, specifically a honey bear 12 oz holds 12 oz in weight. A 16 oz, or 1 pound bear, holds a pound of honey.

So, the old saying, "A pint's a pound the world round" doesn't apply to honey, even if it applies to beer.

Confusing, isn't it. What we get for using the same term to mean different things.

Pugs
 

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I thought that the saying "A pints a pound the world around." Meant that a pint of beer cost a pound sterling. But that might be kind of expensive beer, eh?

Ken, I don't think so. A quart jar filled to the brim will hold about 3 lbs of honey. So, a volume of half that size would be closer to 1.5 lbs. Wouldn't it?

Now, if you want to talk measuring cup type measures then that is a different story.

Either way, the original question is as Hampton said direct[ly] and correct[ly] answered in the second post of the Thread.
 

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An ounce by weight does not necessarily equal an ounce by volume.

Prove this to your self, get out a pint jar. Now pour into it 1 lb of honey. You will notice that the pint jar is not full. It will be 3/4 full just like Buzzy said.

Pugs
 

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Let's not make this more confusing than it is, folks. A pound is a pound, which is 16 ounces (not fluid ounces). A pint of water weighs 16 ounces (1 pound). A pint of honey weighs more and varies, depending on the moisture content of the honey (1.3-1.5lb). Likewise milk weighs more than water (whole milk weighs more than skim). Gasoline weighs less (premium weighs more than regular). Bud light weighs less than regular Bud. Fluid ounces are different and are a measure of volume. Regardless of how many fluid ounces of anything are in a container, a pound is always 16 ounces by weight. Honey is sold by weight, thus containers intended for honey are not speced out by fluid ounces, but ounces. The volume of a tweleve ounce bear is an approximation of how much honey is required to weigh 12 ounces. If your honey is low in moisture, you may be able to squeeze close to 14 ounces of honey into a 12 ounce bear, but if you ever get 16 ounces of honey into one, DON'T EAT IT!
 

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THANK you to everyone. This has often been very confusing to me with conflicting opinions. 16 ozs equals 1 lb. of honey. Three pounds (48) ozs would be one quart jar.

Thanks to everyone!
 

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THANK you to everyone. This has often been very confusing to me with conflicting opinions. 16 ozs equals 1 lb. of honey. Three pounds (48) ozs would be one quart jar.

Thanks to everyone!
I guess if you aren't using standard honey jars and containers I could see why you are confused by this discussion. But if you are using standard honey containers, fill your jar to the rim just at the bottom of the threads where the cap screws down and you have a full jar of honey that you can sell as one pound or two pounds or a 12 oz. honey bear.

If, on the other hand, you are using nonstandard jars. Weigh the jar empty and then weigh it full and label it by the weight of the amount honey you got into the jar.

Or shoot, I don't care, sell your quarts of honey as quarts. Only the weights and measures folks will care and probably not them. Just don't expect to get it on a store shelf.
 

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This is a case where you have to put down your units. One is a volume measure the other is a weight measure and neither are a mass measure. But to simplify things:

16 oz fl = 1.5 lb honey
16 oz = 1 lb honey

If your bottle is calibrated to honey then the bottom number holds.

If your bottle is calibrated to fluid volume measure, then the top number holds (like a Mason jar)

And this isn't even bringing in the differences between a Troy ounce and an Avogadro ounce differences. And then there is difference between weight and mass.

You can thank our English system of units that has gotten mixed up with just plain stubborn folks who won't give up on their own concept of what "is right". We have a system where an ounce means different things in different context; all being proper when used as intended, but a real mess when we try taking shortcuts and mix things up.
 
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