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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been slowly converting all my equipment to 8 frame. In my area I've found they make much better use of their space. Instead of packing frame 1 and 10 with nectar they seem to move it up a lot better. 1 - for me to harvest and 2 - keeps their winter (or summer dearth stores in my case) above the hive instead of surrounding it.

Anyway, I have a LOT of 10 frame equipment. Instead of trying to sell it and purchase all new equipment - who has had success cutting down their 10 frame to 8 frame? I was thinking of running it on the table saw at the edge, then cutting the appropriate amount out, then gluing and re screwing the joint (I used screw to assemble them all so they can be pulled out for cutting.

This would of course place the hand holds off-center, but that's probably okay.

Also, any good resources on turning these into 4 frame nucs (Michael Palmer style)? I think that may also be good use for them if the cost of doing so isn't high. The issue I've run into in the past is most 1x10 lumber measures 9.25" where a deep is 9 5/8". I suppose I could use a 1x12 and cut it down. Same with the mediums, use a 1x8 and cut them down to 6 5/8"?
 

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I run 8 frame boxes... Started that way but have acquired some 10 frames along the way. I have cut several 10 frame medium boxes down to use as 4 frame nucs. I used a table saw set up to halve them. I cut a board to fit into the space left between the ends on each side. Yes you need to buy 1x12 and 1x8 to get the sizes you need. I find that the 4 frame medium does not need a new hand hold. I fir out the bottoms of deeps and add a screwed on bottom of plywood along with a divider board to make two 4 frame chambers. I use a router to cut a slot into the inside of the ends on deeps so that I can insert the divider. Make sure that the divider is bee tight. I put a feed sack on top of the boxes and under a telescoping top.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Lots of work cutting down the boxes. And there are tops, inner covers, and bottom boards. If you want 8 frame, just make and install a follower board on each side of the box and put 8 frames in it. The hives will still have a 10 frame footprint but be almost as light as an 8 frame with very little additional work. JM2C.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Good to know.

I need to measure it out but I also have a lot of 5 frame nucs. I'm curious to know if after halving the 10 frame box and placing a board on the outside vs the inside, on the cut, if this would give me the same dimensions as my 5 frame nucs.

If so, I could have a lot of options ahead of me - just depending on how much work I want to put into it.
 

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Good to know.

I need to measure it out but I also have a lot of 5 frame nucs. I'm curious to know if after halving the 10 frame box and placing a board on the outside vs the inside, on the cut, if this would give me the same dimensions as my 5 frame nucs.

If so, I could have a lot of options ahead of me - just depending on how much work I want to put into it.
The math checks out in theory (minus the insignificant saw kerf). You could also turn the 10 frames into 4 frame Palmer style double Nuc. Just add a divider board in the middle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The math checks out in theory (minus the insignificant dawn kerf). You could also turn the 10 frames into 4 frame Palmer style double Nuc. Just add a divider board in the middle.
My main hesitation regarding that method is that I live on a hill that faces south, perfect for bees. However, his method requires you to alternate the entrance direction, 180 degrees from each other. If I were to do this, one of the hives would be pointing north up the mountain and other areas of my yard are heavily shaded. I could try to put the entrances on the same side, just reduce the entrances down to the outside edges, but if I'm to use these to raise queens I'd think my chance of a queen returning to the wrong side is greatly increased.
 

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I run all 8 frame gear now. I just wanted to chime in about the handles being off center if you do trim your boxes. I suggest you add external handles. I started adding them and it made a huge difference to lifting the hive bodies. Because the external handle runs the length of the end I can place my hands closer towards my body and lift more along my line of strength, where with the inset handles I'm lifting with my arms away from my body. It made a surprising difference in lifting. If you're unsure then just add handles to one box and try it out. I use 3/4 x 1-1/2 strips placed 2" down from the top. I cut a slight bevel on my strips, beveled so rain runs off and the bottom forms an angled grip, fastened with glue and 1-5/8" wood screws (not drywall screws)
 

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.

This would of course place the hand holds off-center, but that's probably okay.
If you cut the "left" side on one end and the "right" side on the other end of the box it would probably balance better. The handholds would be off center, but this way the center of the box is still between the handholds making everything easier to lift.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you cut the "left" side on one end and the "right" side on the other end of the box it would probably balance better. The handholds would be off center, but this way the center of the box is still between the handholds making everything easier to lift.
Very good point! I have enough 10 frame equipment to try out a few things, including making nuc boxes and cutting down a few to 8 frame specs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I also had some time to play with the foam I had laying around. I had some 1.5" and 3" pieces that came in a large workbench I purchased. I was able to cut it to fit into a deep and covered it in foil tape to keep the bees from tearing it apart as well as adding a reflective heat later. I can use these to either reduce the hive size, like a follower board, or add them to insulate my nucs or even reduce an 8 frame box down to 5. Pretty versatile!
 

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You don't need to worry about the original hand-holds if you just screw on some scrap wood handles to replace them...
 

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Very good point! I have enough 10 frame equipment to try out a few things, including making nuc boxes and cutting down a few to 8 frame specs.
Maybe put the handholds at the top of the hive (right under where the telescoping cover is) with strips of wood the whole length of the hive body. You can still wrap for winter. Deb

OOOPS didn’t see the above post!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Very good point! I have enough 10 frame equipment to try out a few things, including making nuc boxes and cutting down a few to 8 frame specs.
Maybe put the handholds at the top of the hive (right under where the telescoping cover is) with strips of wood the whole length of the hive body. You can still wrap for winter. Deb

OOOPS didn’t see the above post!
Haha!

And Winter? What is that? It got down to 40 here one night. Perk of coastal CA!
 

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Charlie B promised me "fabulous" gifts for weeks and then brought me some homemade 10 frame supers. (he had gotten for free, of course) I needed eight frames so I removed 2 1/4 inches from the middle with my table saw, added a handle cleat and toenailed screws top and bottom. Next I have to paint them. I need to practice holding them more steady as I cut.



 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Not bad odfrank!

I went to get the table saw out to get an idea of what I wanted to do and soon realized it's no longer working! She's an old budget grade girl - probably time to die anyway.

Now I'm left with spending $300 to replace it, or spending $300 on equipment. I suppose it would more than pay for itself over time, just irritating.
 

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Craigslist is your friend.

Not bad odfrank!

I went to get the table saw out to get an idea of what I wanted to do and soon realized it's no longer working! She's an old budget grade girl - probably time to die anyway.

Now I'm left with spending $300 to replace it, or spending $300 on equipment. I suppose it would more than pay for itself over time, just irritating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Craigslist is your friend.
I checked, but considering the area they are nearly as much used as they are new (gotta love the bay area). I'm entirely fine spending a little more to get one that will last. I've needed one for far too long anyway and coincidentally have been researching them for quite some time...
 

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A coat of paint hides lot of bad craftsmanship.
 

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Super Moderator
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
A coat of paint hides lot of bad craftsmanship.
They look great!

I've been using 1/8" think gaffer tape and/or 1/8" thick neoprene weather stripping along the tops of my bottom boards and boxes to fill in any gaps.

I've noticed even my "economy" grade boxes have gaps and holes that allow winter breezes in. Doing this has kept them closed up tight! I have no idea why more people don't do this!
 

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Those were good quality deeps I brought Ollie and what’s he do? Paints them diarrhea brown?:scratch:
 
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