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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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This is a real easy calculation, and it does not need to be precise. Add one pint of water for every pound of sugar. I mix 1-1/4 gallons of water to a 10# bag of Wal-Mart's finest pure cane. Makes 2 gallons of syrup.
 

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This is a real easy calculation, and it does not need to be precise. Add one pint of water for every pound of sugar. I mix 1-1/4 gallons of water to a 10# bag of Wal-Mart's finest pure cane. Makes 2 gallons of syrup.
Thankyou! I need to make a small batch to feed a couple splits in nucs.
 

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How much water do you add per pound of sugar for 1;1 syrup?
One gallon of water weighs about 8 lbs. So to make one to one by weight, you mix one gallon of water to 8 lbs of sugar. I like to mix one gallon of water to 10 lbs of sugar. Ah, don't forget to add a tablespoon of regular, simple bleach to the mixture.
 

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#’s of sugar divided by a lb of water (8.35lbs)= number of gallons of water needed to make 1:1
Divide that # by 2 to make 2:1
 

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I am lazier than most and I really do not have the time to be so precise and actually weigh or measure anything. I generally use quart size mason jars and fill it half way with sugar, fill and stir with warm water until all the sugar dissolves (about 10 seconds). All the sugar dissolves just fine and I have never had any issues doing it this way. It is not precise but it is fast. If I am using a pitcher because I need more, same thing. Fill half way with sugar...
 

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I am lazier than most and I really do not have the time to be so precise and actually weigh or measure anything. I generally use quart size mason jars and fill it half way with sugar, fill and stir with warm water until all the sugar dissolves (about 10 seconds). All the sugar dissolves just fine and I have never had any issues doing it this way. It is not precise but it is fast. If I am using a pitcher because I need more, same thing. Fill half way with sugar...
If memory serves me right it is closer to 2/3 sugar before adding the water to get a 1:1 mixture. I don't think the bees are not terribly picky as long as it is somewhere between 0.5:1 and 2:1
 

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How much water do you add per pound of sugar for 1;1 syrup?
Oh God! You've opened this can of worms again. I bet there are a dozen more threads on this topic and they eventually all end up in a brawl. ;)
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Works out pretty much the same. Again, it does not have to be precise. Too much water and the bees just have to evaporate it a little more. Too little water, no problem either. Many people feed 2:1 year round. Better to use the can of worms to go fishing. :D
 

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For practical purposes it really doesn’t matter. A pint of water weighs about a pound. A pint of sugar weighs about a pound. Bags of sugar are marked in pounds. If you do pints of water to pounds of sugar it will work fine. I NEVER make 1:1. It doesn’t keep well and doesn’t accomplish anything that 2:1 or 5:3 won’t accomplish with less spoiled syrup.
 

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The recipe for 1:1 is on every bag of sugar that is sold. You just need to know where to look on the bag to find the recipe.

On the front on the bag, usually near the bottom, you'll see the words Net Wt. or Net Weight. You'll see something that looks like Net Wt. 10 lb (4.5 Kg). That number in the parenthesis, the weight of the bag in kilograms, is the syrup recipe. That number is how many liters of water you add to the bag to make 1:1. A liter weights 1 kilogram (because that is the definition of a kilogram). Almost all pitchers are marked in both quarts and liters. For example, if you look on your ten pound bag of sugar you'll see that it says the net weight is 4.5 kilograms. You add 4.5 liters of water. If the bag says 1.8 kg, you and 1.8 liters of water. And if it says 11 kg, you add 11 liters of water. (that covers the three most common supermarket sugar bag sizes in the US)

No math. You cannot make it any simpler than that.

For 2:1 it is just half as many liters of water as you have kilograms of sugar in your bag.


edit Bonus.
If you want to figure out the yield, there is a little bit of math. Add together the number of kilograms and the number of liters. For 1:1 divide that number by 1.2. For 2:1 divide that number by 1.3. (The density of 1:1 is 1.2 kg/liter and the density of 2:1 is 1.3 kg/liter). So if you take a little supermarket bag of table sugar, it is 1.8 kg of sugar, and 1.8 liters of water, giving you 3.6 kg of syrup. Divide 3.6 by 1.2 and you get 3. The little bag makes 3 liters of 1:1 syrup. You shouldn't need to convert this to gallons - you know how big a 2 liter bottle of soda pop is, so you should have a good intuitive idea for how much syrup it is.
 

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I have a pitcher that is marked off in quarts. If I want 2:1, I pour water up to the 1, then pour sugar in until the water rises to the 3. Simple.

Alex
 
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