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2021-03-28 16.55.04.jpg

Greetings,
This is how I build my OAV from start to finish. It is my intention to show what you will need to purchase and how to complete every step along the way. This will take some time to produce as my free time is limited, I have comments turned off so please PM me if you have questions or require anything. I am selling these units complete or should you want to build your own but lack the tooling to produce a certain piece of the puzzle I can provide you with as little or as much as you like.

Let's get started
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Here is what you will start with.
62780


My parts list is as follows,
Hardware;
  • 1) Machine screws, Phillips truss head, Stainless steel, 1/4"-20 x 2"
  • 1) Machine screws, Phillips pan head, Zinc plated steel, 1/4"-20 x 1-1/8"
  • 2) Machine screws, Phillips pan head, Zinc plated steel, 10-24 x 1-1/8"
  • 1) 1/4-20 Light Hex Standard / NE Nylon Insert Locknuts / Stainless steel
  • 1) 1/4-20 Light Hex Standard / NE Nylon Insert Locknuts / Steel / Zinc
  • 3) 1/4-20 Hex Machine Screw Nuts / Stainless steel
  • 2) 10-24 Hex Machine Screw Nuts / Steel / Zinc
  • 1) 1/4" x 1 1/2" Fender Washers / Stainless steel
  • 1) 1/4" x 1" Fender Washers / Stainless steel
  • 1) 1/4" Machine Screw Flat Washers / Steel / Zinc
Electrical;
  • 1) 1/4" 16-14 AWG Non-Insulated Wire Ring Terminal Connector RNB2-6
  • 1) 16 gauge 24” grounded electrical cord
  • 1) 10” K-type Thermocouple Wire AWG 24 Solid w Fiberglass Insulation
  • 1) MX15006 1-1/2 X 1-1/2 Premium Mica Band Heater 120V 275W
  • 1) Inkbird ITC-106RH Digital Pid Temperature Controller
Copper processing pot;
  • 1) 1-1/4” copper coupling
  • 1) 2” length of 3/16” OD 1/8” ID copper tubing
  • 1) 1-1/2” piece of flat copper .050” thick
  • a length of 5/16” grapho-glass rope (insulation) shortest it comes is a 7’ length
  • Silicone Hollow Tapered Plugs - HTP8-04
Housing;
  • 1)Pass & Seymore P1-22-R 1G Deep Nail up Box
  • 1) Bell outdoor metal blank cover 5173-0
  • 1) 3” length of ½” EPT (electrical conduit)
  • 1) 1/2", Gray, PVC, Threaded Male, Socket, Rigid Conduit Terminal Adapter
  • 1) 1/2", Gray, PVC, Threaded Female, Socket, Rigid Conduit Adapter
  • 1) Cable gland NPT-12-S
  • 1) 3” length of 1”x1/8” Aluminum Rectangle Bar 6061
 
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I do not have a 3D printer so I have assembled this with parts that are available at your hardware or big box store. But! I do have many tools at my disposal that many do not and you will need more than a screwdriver to be able to produce the finished product. For example the vaporizing bowl is made from a 1-1/4" copper coupling, 3/16" copper tube that is 2" long and a piece of flat copper that is easiest to obtain by taking a 1-3/4" length of 1/2" "L" copper tubing and cutting it down the length (I use a 4" grinder with a cut off wheel) then start to spread it apart with two flat screwdrivers or small pry bars. once you get it started you can then switch to a vice and before too long you will have a flat piece of copper. If you plan to make a bunch of these units you will want to buy copper fender washers or discs.
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On the right is the finished product but to get there you will need at least a Mapp gas torch but preferably an Oxy-acetylene torch and some 5% Phos-copper silver brazing alloy. You drill a 3/16" hole 1/2" from the top, insert the 2" long 3/16 OD 1/8" ID copper tube flush with the inside of the bowl (you will need to support it level). With the coupling sitting on the flat piece of copper apply heat (I find Mapp gas does work but Oxy-acetylene works better) to the bottom and using the brazing alloy from the inside of the coupling. I braze the nozzle on both the inside and out but lightly so that there isn't much buildup to have to clean away. Once brazed pick up the whole unit with pliers and submerse it in water. I then seal the top of the bowl with the meaty part of my palm and suck on the nozzle to make sure the unit is completely sealed (probably not the OSHA approved method but it works for me). The center of the bottom has a hole slightly larger than 1/4" drilled so that a 2" long 1/4" stainless steel machine screw can pass through it. Lead free plumbing solder liquifies around 422°F and your processing bowl will exceed that temperature due to overshoot from your set temperature when the oxalic acid has sublimated away, so I would advise against using plumbing solder.
 
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Let's move on to the next hurdle. I have ordered and tried 5 different controllers (the most expensive single part of the items you will be purchasing though the completed copper cook pot is a close second) and each one had positives and negatives. The controller and the band heater are the two parts of the device that are most probable to stop functioning. The band heater can burn out (the one I use has a 1 year guarantee on quality and workmanship) and the controller is an electronic device that in all cases state that they are meant for indoor use only, are not to be stored or used in a humidity level greater than 85% and not subjected to corrosive gasses. As you can see we are breaking the rules with these controllers since we are using them outside and a corrosive gas is present so how much care we take with them will determine how many years of use we will receive. My OAV unit housing is not air tight nor do I want it to be because the controller also needs to be able to cool and a slight amount of airflow is helpful. the face of the controllers I use have a solid face which will keep moisture and dirt from entering it where the buttons are but the unit as a whole is by no means water tight so use your best judgement on whether to use it if there is precipitation or the humidity is so high you can see it. As with any electronic device, electricity and water do not mix so use proper care. I have invested many hours into learning what I could of the PID functions available on the controller and have determined that since the operation takes less than 30 seconds, that there is not a constant amount of material in the cook pot and the time intervals between processes are not equal, then the PID calculations are of no value and the controller should be set to the on/off function. After deciding on using the on/off function there is a variable you can set to make sure that the contacts of the relay in the controller do not get stuck in a rapid on/off state which will definitely shorten the life of the controller. This setting is the hysteresis which I set at 2°. This setting is different on different controllers some use it as a temperature setting to one side (lower) of the set temperature and others use it on both sides of the set temperature meaning that if you have a set temperature of 390°F the controller will activate the heating coil at 388°F and turn it off at 392°F. At which time it will overshoot several degrees before beginning to cool. With this setting should you get distracted from treating for a few minutes and the processing pot stays empty the contact points of the relay will still have adequate time between contacts to ensure the life of the unit. This is doing what the Control time setting would be doing if we were using the PID function. Two degrees is sufficient because the thermocouple is set a distance from the band heater and there is a built in time delay because of that. Should you choose to have your TC trapped between the band heater and pot (I don't know why you would) you might want to up the hysteresis a few more degrees. I will talk more about the controller when we get ready to hook it up.
 
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Now let's get to building the housing.

First you will need a piece of quality hardwood 2" long x3/4"x3/4". This will be used to fasten the aluminum pot support to the plastic electrical box. Wood is used instead of metal because it is an insulator and will stop any heat coming through the support bar from making it to the plastic box. After cutting to size, cut a 1" wide by 1/8" deep rabbit in the center of what will be the bottom, this is to keep the support bar from rotating. Drill a 9/32" hole just slightly off center, about a 32nd" away from the box side. You will also need to drill 2 additional 3/16" holes just slightly more than 1-1/4" apart and 5/16" down from the top which will center the holes in the block's area above the bar and the machine screws that pass through will hit the center of the wire access slots of the plastic box 1/8" from the top of the slot (drill 2) 3/16" holes there). This will place the bottom of the block flush with the bottom of the box.
2021-02-23 15.15.33.jpg

Now take the electrical box, this model was chosen because it is 3-1/4" deep which is the deepest made, and remove the nails from it. I then use an oscillating tool with a scrapper blade (no teeth) to remove the tabs that held the nails. If you haven't already drilled the two 3/16" holes in the center of the wire inset tabs on one side 1/8" from the top, take a drill (I use my drill press) and drill the two holes. I then use a 3/4" hole saw to make a hole where you want the handle. I am currently placing it in the center of the rear face of the box. After drilling the hole I use a 1/2" NPT tap to thread the hole so it will except a 1/2", Gray, PVC, Threaded Male, Socket, Rigid Conduit Terminal Adapter which I thread in most of the way then apply some PVC cement before finishing to turn it in so that it is not only threaded but also glued in place. I then take the nut that comes with the cable gland and install it on the threads that are inside the box, the handle is not going anywhere!. Next use the same PVC adhesive to attach the 3" piece of 1/2" conduit to that fitting and the other female thread fitting and your done with the PVC adhesive. Screw in the cable gland and attach the wood block using the 2) 10-24 machine screws and nuts, the "V" shape of the wire inlets of the box will work like a lock washer in that they will keep some pressure on the connection, don't over tighten them! it's only plastic. You're almost done, just take a drill and 1/8" bit and drill 3 holes 1/4" above the wood block through the face of the plastic box one on the far left for the grounding wire, one to its right just left of the center rib of the box and one just right of this rib both of which are for the heater band cables, and one that i drill 3/8" above the block inside the rib on the left side (I don't drill it in the center of the rib so that it doesn't point directly at the controller when in the box). And "Voilà" you have finished the housing.......... well almost, you still need to make a cover that will hold the controller. I will admit that this is an issue no matter what. This is also why the 3D printers came into play for many. Many of the controllers are just to deep for a regular box and cover. My first cover was made of plywood and it worked but it didn't look great and time would make it look worse so I tried using a blank single electric cover, the same metal one I use now (picked it because the color matched the color of the box. started with a Dremel and cut off wheel. Now I've had quite a few hours of Dremel use under my belt but cutting the 45mm square still took WAY to long and the finished product almost always, ok always, had some sort of ding to it. So I started looking for alternatives and ended up purchasing a 45x45mm Hydraulic Hole Punch Die that I modified to use in my 20 ton shop press. I can now press 2 openings at a time and they look great but I still have to pre-drill the covers so the alignment probe of the die can do its job. This pre-drilled hole is 1-1/2" and I found the best means of making it (wrecked a few covers learning all this) is to make a jig for the drill press that will hold the covers while drilling. This keeps you from getting cut or worse when making the cut as well as protects the cover from getting scratched from movement. I'm going to expect this is enough explanation but if somebody has questions or advice PM me.
I offset the opening in the cover so that the top is 1/2" down from the center of the mounting screw hole. This leaves room between the inside edge of the housing and the controller for it's mounting bracket and wiring while also leaving plenty of room on the other side for what protrudes through the box from the handle. The handle could be mounted higher which would make it more in line with the nozzle providing even easier action when rotating the unit when applying you're OAV treatment. I chose to set the handle lower to leave room for a on/off switch should someone choose to install one. I can make this modification for you but chose not to make it standard because the goal here is to produce an OAV tool as inexpensively as possible while still making it of lasting quality, options that are not necessary are not there.
 
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So we're getting down there. you now have the housing complete and it looks something like this
IMG_20210403_084316136.jpg
Let's mount the pot. You need to have a 9/32" hole in the center of the pot so the SS 1/4" truss head machine screw will pass through. Take the thermocouple wire and remove the jacket and insulation from the wires about 3/4" from one end. then make a tight twist of those wires so that they look like one piece of braided wire (7 or 8 twists) this is all you require for this connection, no solder braze or weld, it's fine. remove 2" of jacket from the other end and 3/8" of insulation from the wires. Install the small 1" fender wash on the 1/4" screw that you have through the pot (head in the pot) and screw one of the SS nuts on till there is a small gap between the washer and pot. Insert the twisted end of the TC wire under the washer so that the jacket and insulation touch the washer (only the twisted wire is under the washer) so that it is opposite the nozzle of the pot and tighten down the nut so that the wire is trapped securely (more than finger tight, use a wrench and screwdriver). flip it upside down on a desk and slide the heater band around the pot so that the electrical wires are opposite the nozzle. Install the large fender washer and another nut and tighten it down.

Now the fun part - applying the 5/16 Grapho-glas rope. Start by filling the gap between the two washers. Wrap it around snug but not supper tight, 3 wraps should get you even to the edges of the washers, about 7". cut the rope and tuck the frayed end under the wrap. now insert the beginning of the next wrap under the band heater clamp screw from the top side so that the cut end is now flush with the bottom of the band heater. take a 7/64" Allen wrench and tighten the band heater clamp screw till the band heater is tight around the pot flush with the bottom, you want the open area opposite the nozzle as the open area will produce the least amount of heat and you want the nozzle to remain as hot as possible to keep the OA from building up in it because it cooled too fast. I now take that 4" grinder with a cut off wheel and remove the excess threads from the band clamp, make sure you have it how you want it because there is no second chance once you cut it, you will need a new clamp. Now this wrap needs to be tight so it stays put! use your thumb to hold the rope at the top of the pot just to the right side of the band opening and begin clockwise (from the top) tight wraps the first being over the top of the nozzle base and when you come around the pot you cross over where your thumb is tacking it down so that now the wrap is locking it in place. continue wrapping around one layer deep working towards the bottom of the band heater making sure you are pushing the wraps up toward the top of the unit as tight as you can compress both to the band and to each other wrap. about the 8th time around you will be at the bottom but don't give up, you can push it tighter and get a 9th wrap in still on the band. now go once more around on top of that filling wrap between the two washers and then cut it off where you think it looks even, then use a flat bladed screwdriver or similar and tuck the frayed end under the large washer. This will take about 48" of rope. Be proud of yourself, that was some coordinated work but you did it. for safe measure I take some super glue gel and apply it where the end got tucked it to keep it from unraveling. I also use it on the cut jacket and insulation of the thermocouple at this time to keep that from unraveling as well. Now what you are holding in your hand looks like this.
IMG_20210403_121417235.jpg

Take the electrical cord and strip back the jacket 6" being careful not to cut the wiring insulation. There are several ways to do this properly but the one that uses the tool most have is to use a utility knife and cut around the jacket what you perceive to be 1/2 way through it (the jacket not the entire cable) then bend the cable where you collared it and you will see that it splits on the outside radius of the bend down to the wiring. continue this process till you have a clean break all the way around. Now if you're lucky enough to have a cord with a liner you should be able to pull the 6" piece of jacket off, if not you will need to be extremely careful with that utility knife and cut a slit down the length of the 6" about 3/4 of the way through the thickness of the jacket. when you get to the last inch cut all the way through the jack. split the jacket apart here and grab one of the wires with one hand and the jacket with the other and pull like a wishbone. The wire will tear through the jacket and you will have it off. strip back the insulation from the wire just 3/8" from the end and twist the stranded wire together. push this end of the cable through the cable gland till the jacket is flush with the end of the conduit handle that is inside the box, tighten down the gland so that it seals the cable and keep it from turning when you turn the unit while treating, This will keep you from twisting the electrical wires inside the housing which could possibly make the connections loose or disconnected. Now pass the green ground wire through the hole you drilled on the left side of the box as you look at the front face. attach the 1/4" grounding ring to the wire.
Take the aluminum bar and drill a 9/32" hole in the center of each end 5/16" from each end. using the 1/4" zinc coated machine screw place the 1/4" flat washer on it , pass it through the grounding ring you just attached to the ground wire, pass it through the hole in the wood block, flip he whole thing over and attach the aluminum mounting bar to the screw with the zinc coated lock nut, tighten securely.
Now take the pot assembly and thread another 1/4" SS nut about 3/4" up the screw, place each of the wires through their holes so that they line up, arrange the wiring in the box as you are feeding it in. The ground wire should be placed along the right side as you look through the top of the box and just pull the rest of them out the top of the box. Insert the pot screw into the other hole of the aluminum mounting bar and screw the SS lock nut till it is flush with the end of the screw, then tighten the nut on the other side of the bar till it is tight to the bar making sure the nozzle points forward and the pot doesn't rotate. I have thought about leaving this a bit loose to allow for some give should you trip over the cord while treating but decided to make them tight, it's your call on yours.
Holy cow!!! all we have left is the controller. WEEEEEEEEEEEE
 
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This is where I'm at with the controller, First lets mount it and get the OAV unit finished then we will discuss what I have learned about these wonderful little gizmo's.
I started with the Inkbird ITC-106RH but think I'm switching to the Toky AI208X4-MB10 A so I will show that and give settings for it first.
here is a photo of both units
IMG_20210403_152516312.jpg
The installation of both is super simple as far as getting is anchored to the cover plate. just slide it through the opening and for the Toky simply slide the mounting hardware into the channels of the control housing and push them toward the cover till there is flex in the plastic legs that keep tension making the unit tight to the plate. there is then a screw on each side that you tighten down till it touches the back of the plate.
Now the wiring. You will need a 2" jumper wire that I cut from the cord before I made the cord that was described earlier. Like I stated earlier, I have tried out 5 different controllers now and the wiring has all been the same, you just need to read the side of the unit to see which screw is which. you are only concerned with the power input, the relay output and the thermocouple input screws. the relay output diagram will be output 1 and will have a "COM", "NO" & "NC" screw. These stand for common, normally open and normally closed. common means that the other two screws share that screw (I'm using "screws" instead of "contacts" here to make it easy for everyone, electricians please forgive me). Normally open means that if the controller has done what has been asked of it the electrical contact will be open and it will stop, this is the screw you want. I prefer to wire the unit so that the power, not the neutral is flowing through the relay so of the two screws that state they are power input I attach the white (neutral) wire of the power cord and one of the white wires of the heater band under the plate behind the screw of the connection that is furthest to the outside. I then place the black (line) wire of the power cord and one side of the 2" jumper wire (which has the insulation stripped back 3/8" on both ends) under the other power in connection that is closer to the inside of the controller. The other end of that jumper wire will go to the "COM" connection and the other white wire from the band heater will go to the "NO" connection. You are going to make sure all these connections are tight but don't apply soo much pressure that you strip out the screws. I know, how much is too much right? This is a learned thing but these are small screws and it's a small amount of pressure but enough so that you cant pull the wires free. Now the thermocouple wire have a + and - wire and it depend on whos "K" type thermocouple you purchased. mine is red (-) and yellow (+) but there are other colors out there but not to worry just hook it up and if the band heater isn't coming on than you likely have them reversed (unless your initial setting is set below the current air temperature, in which case it will be on and you will need to unplug it to shut it off). That being said I have done enough of these that I hook up the wires place the controller in the box arranging the wiring as I do so, attach it to the box with the screws that came with the cover and plug it in to change the settings on the controller. But you are likely going to be more comfortable not having the band heater operational when you are setting the controller so don't hook up the wires to the band heater but hook up all the others as stated and assemble the unit. this will keep you safe from electrical shock by having the open wiring closed up in the unit. after you have the controller set, unplug the unit remove the controller far enough to hook up the band heater cables and then reassemble the unit. There will be clicking of the relay contacts and lights that come on when you have the controller powered up which will let you know what it is doing. you decide which way you are most comfortable setting up the controller. I will say that changing the temperature is fast and that will be step one.

IMG_20210403_162219319.jpg
 
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Setting the Controller,

I will start with the Toky to run through the settings and why I chose what I did, You may chose other settings, again if you have questions PM me and we will work it out.

  1. Set the temperature to something below air temperature till you have the controller set to what you want it doing then later go back and change the temperature to the OAV setting of 390°F. I chose this temperature because it is high enough to sublimate the OA and the lower you keep the temperature setting the longer the silicone plugs that you put the OA into will last. Those plugs are rated for 600°F but they do deteriorate with the acid and heat. So to set the temperature you will plug the unit in and press the lest arrow button which will make the first digit blink. You don't care about the first digit so arrow left twice more to get you to the third digit and press the down button till you get to "0", if that gets you below what the current air temperature is you are all set but remember you are likely in Celsius so you will want it below 22°, arrow left to get to the second digit if need be, otherwise press the "set" button and the band heater should turn off (you will know this because the "output1" light will go out) and the PV display should stop rising. If the output1 is still lit after you have set the temperature to what is lower than the air around you then the thermocouple wires are backwards and you need to unplug the unit to remove the face plate and reverse the wiring of the TC.
  2. Get the instructions in front of you that tell you what the 1,2 or 3 letter codes are you will be looking at. press the "set" button for 3 seconds and the PV display will change to AL1. we don't have a use for the alarm feature so we will turn it off by setting it to "0". Once again press the arrow left and the up or down button to get the setting where you want it. obviously it will be the same process for all the settings.
  3. press "set" again but from now on it's just for a second to change to the next function. If you are done with the settings you can just wait 30 seconds or hold down the "set" button and you will leave settings. after pressing set you see "HY1", this is hysteresis which is how many degrees different from the set alarm temperature you want the alarm to activate at. again this will be 0.
  4. set, "Ad1" alarm again "0".
  5. set "PS" this is to ammend the shown value of the SV display. If you want your unit to be closer to perfect then you can fill the pot with water and set the PV to 230°F and see what the SV reads while the water is boiling. it should read slightly above 220°F. I did this for the first units and the adjustment was less than 10° so I don't bother any more but this is where you do this if you want.
  6. set, "InP" this should come preset at K which looks like a backward y. just leave it there because you are using a K type thermocouple.
  7. set, "ot" this is the control mode and in my opinion should be set to on/off which is just as it states, the controller is not attempting to second guess what is going on with what it is controlling it is simply coming on when the temperature gets to a certain point and off when it gets to another. Notice I didn't say the set temperature which is because there is a hysteresis setting for the on/off setting as well and that will be coming up. for this controller on/off is "0", the PID functions is "1". There are other choices but they don't pertain to us. If you buy a unit from me it will be set to on/off "0". I am going to skip the pid settings but I will give the reason why later.
  8. set, if "ot" was set to 0 then the readout will be "db" which is the hysteresis setting for the on/off function. This is set to protect the contacts of the relay within the controller which I stated above in the fourth of the comments in this showcase. Again I set this a two degrees though I really don't think it is necessary because even set at 0 and no treatments being given to make the temperature swing down to 315, the time the relay will be active will be 6 to 10 seconds and then the overshoot to 410° will take about a minute to get back to 390°. but let's be safe and set it to 2°. The only time I have ever had the relay chatter at me was when it was in the PID setting and trying to control something it couldn't.
  9. set, "LCk" is the lock function. to get to the advanced settings you need to set this to "33". It will not remain there, it will reset to "0" when you leave the settings. you can also use this to lock out the SV or the complete menu if you like, but let's set it to 33.
  10. set, "ACt" is 0 for relay and 1 for SSR, Yyou want "0".
  11. set, "AE1" again has to do with the alarm, leave it at "0".
  12. set, "FL" what is the low range of your measuring? Leave it at -50 which is the low ranger of the K type thermocouple.
  13. set, "HR" high range of the same, leave it at 999 which is as high as it can read out.
  14. set, "dp" is the decimal point setting either 0 or 1, this doesn't really matter for the accuracy we are trying to achieve here so you can leave it at "0". This was one of the funny things about this controller, it only has a read out of 3 places so once the temperature exceeds 99° the decimal disappears so it doesn't have much use.
  15. set, "Ft" this is a filter for electrical noise, set it to "0".
  16. set, "Ut" this is the temperature unit c or f you decide but since I've been saying 390°F throughout I will say here to set it to "F".
  17. set, "dtr" this is a PV fuzzy tracking value, set it to 0 to turn it off.
  18. set, "SSM" this is a sweet option, set to "0" it does nothing but set to "1" it makes holding the up arrow for 3 seconds shut the band heater off and "StP" is displayed in the SV readout. now you have an on/off switch without extra expense, such a deal!.
  19. set again just displays what version of the controller you have.
So that it. there are all the settings, now you can get back to the normal display by waiting 30 seconds or hold the set button for 3 seconds. set your SV to 120°F and let it warm and bake off anything in the band heater that came from its manufacture. When it stops smoking go ahead and set it to 390°F and let it cycle a few time to see what it does. This one with all the setting we just went through heats up to 390° and the OUT1 light goes out the temp rises to 402° and then falls to 388 before activating the band heater again. If we were doing treatments the overshoot will be greater because the band would be much hotter than the bottom of the pot which is where the TC is that is telling the controller how hot things are. when the OA fully sublimates the temperature of the bottom exceeds 390° and the band heater shuts down but the band and the outside of the pot were much hotter than the TC said they were which is where the overshoot comes from. As I said I have the temperature set at 390° but if you are having issues with OA buildup in the nozzle tube you may want to try raising that a bit.
 
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Setting the Inkbird ITC-106RH
the setting are set up differently, it is more like chapter and verse with the chapters being
  1. IP - input settings
  2. oP - output settings
  3. ALP - alarm settings
  4. PId - pid settings and
  5. unit - temperature C or F
When you get into the settings it will start you out with the first chapter choice, if you dont want that chapter press set again to go to the next chapter. continue to do this till you get to the chapter you want then press the left arrow button and it will take you to the first verse, press the set button and it will take you to the next verse. if you are at the verse you want to be at press the up or down arrow to change the options for that verse. There are many settings and I am not going to be dealing with any of them that don't affect the use of the OAV, this includes the PID settings. I will be setting it to on/off. Let's get started.

hold the set button for 2 seconds.

IP, left arrow (LA), Sn displays which is the input type which comes preprogramed for a K type thermocouple, again the backwards y so just leave it there,
SET, SC displays, this is the choice for calibration where you can again fill the pot with water and when it boils check what the PV shows and make that adjustment like stated above. I suppose if you knew for sure what the air temperature is you could also use that if the tool has acclimated
SET, dL displays, this is digital filtering, just set it to 0.
SET will take you back to chapter 1, press SET again to advance to chapter 2
oP displays, LA, CtrL displays, press the down button till onof displays to set it to on/off.
SET, set it to HEAt if its on Cool.
SET, "run" displays, it is preset to "dn" which is "manual inhibit" which will keep your from accidently holding the left arrow button and locking it to the "on" state. it locks it into the automatic mode which is where you want it.
SET twice more brings you to the next chapter which is alarm and we don't deal with that so set the mode to 0 the next to 9999, next to -1999, next to 0 and next to 0 the first 0 turns off the alarm and the others set the highs and lows out of reach and the final two 0's are the hysteresis applied to the high and low. The 5th thing you come to is "dF" which is the hysteresis which is used for both the alarms and the on/off function so for safety's sake we set this to 2.
SET, "dISP" appears, set this to "of" for off which just turns off the alarm light should your settings turn it on (which they shouldn't)
SET SET changes the chapter to Pid, None of this chapter comes into play because we are using the ON/OFF function not the PID function.
SET once more displays "unit", LA displays "C" or "F"
SET once more takes you out of the menu settings.
 
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Well my friends, that's it. I have had some input on what could be better along with solid reasoning why it would be better and because it made sense and I agreed I have made those changes in what I've posted here and in the units I am producing. If you have additional input or questions please don't hesitate to PM me, I'm not against helping others or having them help me. as stated at the beginning I have these for sale complete for $150 plus shipping and handling of $30 unless your zip code is higher than 84500, then shipping will be higher. my education on shipping has been almost as interesting as the education on making the OAV unit. Individual parts are also available should you want just the process pot, controller, face plate, plugs or whatever. God Bless!
 
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