APIVAR
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Thread: APIVAR

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Lake County, Illinois
    Posts
    243

    Default APIVAR

    Has anyone had experience with Apivar. I am planning to use it after I harvest my honey and pull the supers. There are always some supers that I can not pull as they are not capped so I leave them on. It is my understanding that all supers need to be pulled. I would appreciate any suggestions and comments on this product. Also because I have health and lung issues is there any information about the need for protective clothing?Is it only available from Man Lake as I have been reading some threads here that are not very favorable.
    Thanks.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    yorkville, il
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    50

    Default Re: APIVAR

    i have been using apivar for the past 8 years or so. when handling, just wear disposable rubber gloves. no fumes, no vapors. in a 10 frame deep place two strips staggered off the center frame. treatment last about 45 days. if the weather gets too cold you may need to leave them in over winter. i rotate with oxalic acid vapor treatment and also mite away quick strips. do mite checks regularly and treat accordingly.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    5,382

    Default Re: APIVAR

    Apivar is THE industry wide accepted miticide for effectiveness and ease of application. It is widely available from just about any bee supply house. I personally would not use it while supers that I later intend for honey are present. Better to pull the supers, treat and feed if necessary, and then put the supers back two weeks after you remove the strips. This is consistant with the instructions for use. Use simple latex or nitrile gloves when handling and always wash your hands afterwards. The active ingredient, amitraz, is still found in some flea and tick collars used on pets last time I checked.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    syracuse n.y.
    Posts
    5,514

    Default Re: APIVAR

    you can get it from most of the vendors, make sure the manufacture date is within 2 years. Not a doctor but shouldn't present any health problems, use nitril gloves, the label say's nothing about any other equipment that I can remember, it's a contact pesticide so should not cause any lung problems. If it is not expired so far seems to work fine, watch for re-infestations from other beeks in your area. only get enough for your normal use, it degrades once opened, some people have resealed and frozen, no clue how these will work
    mike syracuse ny
    Whatever you subsidize you get more of. Ronald Reagan

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    1,470

    Default Re: APIVAR

    I use Apivar on all my hives every September. I use OA the rest of the year. Apivar is available from many suppliers. I've never had an issue with Mann Lake before. It is by far the easiest of the mite treatments and it has 99.9% kill. It leaves no residue in the wax but it does take ten weeks to disperse after the strips are removed. It's drawback is expense.
    Zone 6B

  7. #6

    Default Re: APIVAR

    Just started using it. I twisted a 3" drywall screw through the hole in top rather than bend out tab. Seems to hang loose enough between frames if mounted this way to allow bees to go on both sides of strip.

    I had some mites coming out of winter and have never treated before. Loosing 3/4 of stock every 2nd year changed my mind on treating. This year I'm making bees and letting the honey go except for one hive (where I don't have strips installed). For me, it's strickly a hobby (some might say obsession) and $7.20 per deep box is not a factor. Especially considering the money I've lost not treating. But I won't know how effective they are for several more weeks.

    As far as handling, there is no vapor and I don't think exposure is any worse than stretching a dog/cat tick collar. Still, follow directions.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    881

    Default Re: APIVAR

    Quote Originally Posted by joebeewhisperer View Post
    Just started using it. I twisted a 3" drywall screw through the hole in top rather than bend out tab. Seems to hang loose enough between frames if mounted this way to allow bees to go on both sides of strip.
    I might have to try that. I have been putting a zip tie thru the hole and just centering the strip on it. The built in hanging tabs dont work very well.

    I have had good luck with apivar with my hives when I do not wait to long to treat. I wear gloves, and throw them out when I am done, otherwise I dont think there are any special precautions
    3 Hives, Started in 2017, Learning as I go
    My data logger

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    7,892

    Default Re: APIVAR

    Be sure to do sugar rolls or alcohol washes to check results. The mite population in my area shows it has grown tolerant to apivar. I discontinued using it three years ago in favor of Oxalic acid vaporization.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Lake County, Illinois
    Posts
    243

    Default Re: APIVAR

    IThis information was very helpful and I will try Apivar this year. Since it should be used with our supers on what would you suggest I do with those supers that have not filled or remain uncapped. I have too magneto freeze.I will of course wait until I have harvested but there is always frames and supers that should probably stay on longer or even remain foe the winter.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Northeast
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    574

    Default Re: APIVAR

    I use apivar for my out apiary so I don't have to go there every week to do OAV treatments.

    It's very expensive, even in the 50 packs, but its effective and I can just leave it there on the hives for 8 weeks and the mites are reduced down to safe levels.

    There's no temperature sensitivity and it's quite simple an straightforward to use.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Lake County, Illinois
    Posts
    243

    Default Re: APIVAR

    What do you do if you have to leave some supers on that have not capped. As I understand it the supers must be removed. Will they be able to be used next year?
    Thanks
    Quote Originally Posted by username00101 View Post
    I use apivar for my out apiary so I don't have to go there every week to do OAV treatments.

    It's very expensive, even in the 50 packs, but its effective and I can just leave it there on the hives for 8 weeks and the mites are reduced down to safe levels.

    There's no temperature sensitivity and it's quite simple an straightforward to use.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Northeast
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    574

    Default Re: APIVAR

    Quote Originally Posted by Plannerwgp View Post
    What do you do if you have to leave some supers on that have not capped. As I understand it the supers must be removed. Will they be able to be used next year?
    Thanks
    You need to remove the supers before apivar. Unlike formic and oxalic acids, apivar is a legitimate pesticide and will likely cause cancer if it gets into food.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
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    5,382

    Default Re: APIVAR

    Plannerwgp, I can think of no good reason to leave the supers of uncapped honey in place while treating with Apivar. To what end? The honey will not be fit for human consumption. Remove the supers, extract, and feed back to the bees. Two weeks after the strips have been removed, you can put the supers back on to catch a fall flow or to fill with syrup for overwintering.
    Unlike the use of Oxalic Acid, there are no dissenting opinions in this regard. Amitraz is a synthetic chemical with known health risks if ingested. There is no middle ground. The risk lies in the honey, not the comb. If there is any of the contaminated honey left over, it will get mixed with the new honey rendering it all contaminated. There is no danger of treating with EMPTY supers, provided they remain empty during the entire treatment process and for a few weeks afterwards. But then, why even have them on?
    Last edited by JWPalmer; 07-12-2020 at 09:57 AM.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    432

    Default Re: APIVAR

    JW, how do you feed honey back to the bees? I'd like to know a good method. I've only witnessed mass drowning whenever there's the least puddle of honey, as when I've left the extractor out for the bees to clean the residue, which once it warmed up in the sun, caused the residual minute amount to pool. A friend was much remorseful after giving her bees a jar of dregs to clean up, only to find they'd stampeded in and packed in , compounding the death toll.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: APIVAR

    Quote Originally Posted by karenarnett View Post
    JW, how do you feed honey back to the bees?
    I dilute the honey to less than the viscosity of 1:1 syrup. Then pour it into the hive feeder. If open feeding, I just use an open tray with strips of wood floating in it. I learned the hard way too. My first attempt at feeding honey and cappings back to the bees resulted in a significant death toll.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Columbia, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    262

    Default Re: APIVAR

    Apivar is my go-to. I used to be a big fan of formic acid products since the mite drop was so high, but I kept having issues with queen losses
    USDA Hardiness Zone 7A, Hobbyist, First Hives in 2017

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    5,382

    Question Re: APIVAR

    Karen, this is a picture from this evening of a hive top feeder on my deck with strips of wood in it being used as an open feeder. The liquid is the water from the first rendering of my cappings. And to think, I used to dump it down the drain.

    20200713_201021.jpg
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  19. #18

    Default

    Do not leave this in the hive longer then prescribed, as the lower doses of Amitraz allows the mites to become resistant.

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    hendersonville nc usa
    Posts
    107

    Default Re: APIVAR

    Quote Originally Posted by Akademee View Post
    Apivar is my go-to. I used to be a big fan of formic acid products since the mite drop was so high, but I kept having issues with queen losses
    i have been using it since they came out with it, i like it . i put a frame nail through the hole. i run about 60 double deeps.when i was younger i just sat the top deep on the up side down lid put the strips in the bottom deep then sat the top deep back on and put strips in it. now it is very hard for this 70 year old body to lift a deep, so i just take out frams so i can put the strips in the bottom.

  21. #20
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Lake County, Illinois
    Posts
    243

    Default Re: APIVAR

    What is the treatment time for Apivar?

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