"asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...
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  1. #1
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    Question "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Hello, all,

    I was wondering about terminology. I have heard beekeepers use the word "absconded" to describe when a colony of bees desert a hive, but that doesn't seem right to me because it has a connotation as if the bees were doing something wrong. Which probably were doing what they thought was necessary for survival.

    Perhaps relocated, departed, IDK....

    thanks,
    Thomas
    My grandfather and great-uncle kept bees and my fiancée's grandfather, too. I want to pass this tradition along.

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Well it means they took their "stuff" and split!

    verb
    past tense: absconded; past participle: absconded
    leave hurriedly and secretly, typically to avoid detection of or arrest for an unlawful action such as theft.
    "she absconded with the remaining thousand dollars"

    Some will do it just because you irritate them. They do it because they are no longer happy with the accommodations at this particular bed and breakfast.

    It is not a "normal" bee thing to do. It is rare in nature and should be rare in the hive.

    They may leave because there is no food, too nosy of a beekeeper, noisy neighbors, overheating, foul (to the bees) odors, parasites, too much free rein by predators, or certain chemicals. Bees in a tree might leave because a bear is getting at them, the tree falls down, or humans encroach on their territory to build homes or waste dumps. If they are living in your hive... then likely you did something wrong, and they are taking their business elsewhere.

    It's their way of telling you "It's not me, it's you!" "You are the bad roommate, and we can't take it anymore." It's a breakup and call it what you will, they are unfriending you on all the socials and ghosting you.

  4. #3
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    There are plenty of nits to pick if you get into word usage and grammar. Nobody here vaporizes oxalic acid but the term has stuck.
    5 Production colonies, 1 side by side 5 frame nuc for support- 7 working queens is all I want.

  5. #4
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Lol, as a chemist, oxalic acid 'vaporization' drives me up the wall!
    USDA Hardiness Zone 7A, Hobbyist, First Hives in 2017

  6. #5
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Well - speaking as a graduate organic chemist - what's wrong with that term ?
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  7. #6
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    I think sometimes the abscond story is put forth when what actually transpired was that the bees succumbed to disease, mites, starvation, laying worker etc., dwindled, and individually flew off to die or robbed out. PPB might have been the main causative factor.

    I guess in the case of overrun by wax moth or small hive beetle, the sorry lot of remaining bees would abandon the hive en masse but healthy colonies dont abandon ship without some reason. Maybe africanized are a different story.
    Frank

  8. #7
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Most societal groups that specialize in one thing or another, such as beekeepers, develop a particular terminology. Linguistic perfection is not a common trait. Slang on the other hand, and peculiar phrasing and words IS part of the
    Terroir (/tɛˈrwɑːr/ if you will. After a time you get acclimated to what is meant.

    Because this forum represents an international audience it gets a bit more complicated, and arguably, enriched. I have noticed several strong personalities here. Highly opinionated people are not something to run away from, rather I value their input because in the end we are all trying to find both our style of beekeeping and a perfection of practice. The science of beekeeping is, and will always be, a frontier. We have our moderators to keep the chickens herded.

    Enjoy the journey of discovery.
    Last edited by Trin; 07-10-2020 at 03:16 PM.

  9. #8
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    Default

    Re: vape. I beg to differ if we are using the wand then it is sublimation. But aren't all the everclear, glycerine, mineral oil di water and fog juice people actually vaping them? Or maybe they are fogging them.

  10. #9
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    SUBLIMATION - Thermopedia
    [Search domain www.thermopedia.com/content/1163/] www.thermopedia.com/content/1163/
    Sublimation, or volatization, is the process of changing from a solid phase to a gaseous one, without first forming a liquid.Sublimation is one type of vaporization (see Vapor-liquid equilibrium).As with evaporation, sublimation is possible within the whole range of temperatures T and pressures p over which the solid and gaseous phases coexist.

  11. #10
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    The target audience is not one of chemistry students, and therefore an esoteric definition is not appropriate. The term "vapourisation" as commonly used conveys a general understanding, in the sense of "a substance diffused or suspended in the air, especially one normally liquid or solid." - that's good enough, which is really all that matters.

    It is quite true that sublimation takes place - but only very briefly - for as soon as the OA (in it's gaseous phase) leaves the heat source, it cools to below it's sublimation temperature and undergoes reverse sublimation (often called deposition) back into the solid state - only, as the OA molecules became widely separated during the gaseous phase, the resulting solid is then in the form of a micro-fine crystalline dust. And that's what actually enters the beehive.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  12. #11
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    "The target audience is not one of chemistry students, and therefore an esoteric definition is not appropriate."

    Oh quit being so sensitive. We are all here to learn.

  13. #12
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    I do declare, I just about get a case of the vapors every time I try to sublimate. (wait for it):

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  14. #13
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    And in true Southern fashion I respond, "That's nice."
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  15. #14
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    And in true Southern fashion I respond, "That's nice."
    I'm glad I was finished with my "cofeffee" else I would be cleaning my screen.

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  16. #15
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Quote Originally Posted by Trin View Post
    Most societal groups that specialize in one thing or another, such as beekeepers, develop a particular terminology. Linguistic perfection is not a common trait. Slang on the other hand, and peculiar phrasing and words IS part of the
    Terroir (/tɛˈrwɑːr/ if you will. After a time you get acclimated to what is meant.

    Because this forum represents an international audience it gets a bit more complicated, and arguably, enriched. I have noticed several strong personalities here. Highly opinionated people are not something to run away from, rather I value their input because in the end we are all trying to find both our style of beekeeping and a perfection of practice. The science of beekeeping is, and will always be, a frontier. We have our moderators to keep the chickens herded.

    Enjoy the journey of discovery.
    I think more like cats..or squirrels.

  17. #16
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    And in true Southern fashion I respond, "That's nice."
    Not even going to bless his heart?

  18. #17
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Nah, "Bless his heart" is too mild in this instance. I am going straight for the jugular.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  19. #18
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    I 'gas' the girls with my OA wand. When I gassed my daughter's hive my SIL asked what that meant I told him I was 'fumigating' them. As a gardener and forester he knows what that means, so I didn't have to bother defining the beeks' terminology.
    Never ask a barber if he thinks you need a haircut.

  20. #19
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Quote Originally Posted by Yunzow View Post
    Hello, all,

    I was wondering about terminology. I have heard beekeepers use the word "absconded" to describe when a colony of bees desert a hive, but that doesn't seem right to me because it has a connotation as if the bees were doing something wrong. Which probably were doing what they thought was necessary for survival.

    Perhaps relocated, departed, IDK....

    thanks,
    Thomas
    well back to the thread...
    Abscond is in general, when you go out to the hive after who knows how long could be a few days or a few months, and Viola, the bees are gone.
    As most keepers cannot fathom they did something wrong, the presumption is the bees just up and left.

    the actual happenings and the timing can be several reasons, or different things.

    GG

  21. #20
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    Default Re: "asconded", ditched, deserted, left, whatever...

    Hey Frank,

    what is it that Africanized bees do? Do you mind explaining?

    thanks,
    Thomas

    Quote Originally Posted by crofter View Post
    I think sometimes the abscond story is put forth when what actually transpired was that the bees succumbed to disease, mites, starvation, laying worker etc., dwindled, and individually flew off to die or robbed out. PPB might have been the main causative factor.

    I guess in the case of overrun by wax moth or small hive beetle, the sorry lot of remaining bees would abandon the hive en masse but healthy colonies dont abandon ship without some reason. Maybe africanized are a different story.
    My grandfather and great-uncle kept bees and my fiancée's grandfather, too. I want to pass this tradition along.

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