super placement question post harvest & during dearth
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    NW Florida
    Posts
    1,186

    Default super placement question post harvest & during dearth

    I'm zone 9A, so right on the Gulf of Mexico. The flow has significantly slowed and will stay slow with a possible dearth until goldenrod in August/September. We are harvesting Spring honey and a question comes to mind. I usually let the bees clean the frames and then store them until goldenrod, but that is not as easy this year. How many of you put them back on the hives and leave them there until the next flow? If you tend to do that, how much of an issue are wax moths? It would provide more space to regulate the heat as we creep up to the 100+ mark in a month, but wax moths drive me batty. Please keep in mind my southern location. What have you found to work best for you?
    Beek since 2016: Hardiness Zone 9a: in NW Florida

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Decatur / Cullman, also. 35603
    Posts
    897

    Default Re: super placement question post harvest & during dearth

    Hi Heather, I'd process the honey, and put the boxes a way from the hives. Let the bees clean em good. Then stack em on top of hives . Wax moths and beetles will get them.if not enough bee coverage. Distribute evenly over hives, or best freeze em.
    Some say leaving them out with sunlight hitting them in uncovered boxes work. How's the harvest coming there?

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    ElDorado,Arkansas,USA
    Posts
    1,632

    Default Re: super placement question post harvest & during dearth

    Let the bees clean them.Spray them with Bt and store them.Bt will keep your wax worms killed off.Non toxic also.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: super placement question post harvest & during dearth

    What is BT?

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    718

    Default Re: super placement question post harvest & during dearth

    When you harvest spring honey,there will always be partial frames or frames of uncured nectar.There is less chance of waxmoth or SHB damage if you store these on you hives with your stickies until the fall flow.Q excluder up to you.
    However,if you are planning mite treatments,make sure you follow the label regarding supers.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Red Bud, IL, USA
    Posts
    1,814

    Default Re: super placement question post harvest & during dearth

    Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies aizawai (Bta)

    Only using the subspecies of aizawai is critical, others are harmful to the bees. XenTari is one of the commercial products.
    “The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” -George Bernard Shaw

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan, USA
    Posts
    1,307

    Default Re: super placement question post harvest & during dearth

    as I am in the north the process is different, I generally put them on to clean to prevent robbing and they seem rougher on comb off the hive VRS on the hive.

    Once cleaned then store with BT in a sealed semi cool environment.

    i guess ask some of the local keepers what they do as your locale here is driving what you do.

    GG

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    5,204

    Default Re: super placement question post harvest & during dearth

    Heather, I store about half of my supers on the hives. They clean and repair them and have them ready for storage later if I choose. Like GG says, the bees are rougher on the comb, more like robbing, when they clean them away from the hive. As part of the hive, they take care of them. Last year, only the combs on the hives escaped the wax moth carnage. The stuff I stored inside was largely destroyed. I have a couple of pounds of paramoth for this winter. The BT.k (not BT.a) that I used last year was pretty much ineffective at controling wax moths.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

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