There were two things I swore I'd never make again, then this happened yesterday…
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  1. #1
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    Default There were two things I swore I'd never make again, then this happened yesterday…

    • I once said I'd never make a gabled hive top roof again. Mainly because you can't flip a gabled roof over on the ground to stack boxes on. Then I got me a couple of these things on a 50% sale and now I don't have to bend over as much to pick the boxes back up. I'm happy with the way this one turned out, but I forgot to do one thing, I didn't put a water tension break groove on the overhanging shingle. This top is insulated with 2" XPS and is intended to be used with a perspex inner cover, right now its sitting on a Vivaldi board.


    • Frames are a hassle to make when they are so inexpensive. I needed to make some short frames for a quad mini-mating nuc. Since I was making short top and bottom bars, I went ahead and made side bars. I remember now why they are a hassle to make.
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  3. #2
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    Feb 2015
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    Default Re: There were two things I swore I'd never make again, then this happened yesterday…

    For those interested in how the gabled roof is constructed.

    The shingles are western red cedar. Start with 3/4″ stock, 3-1/2″ wide (1x4) x 24" long. Temporarily glue a 1/2″ wide by 3/8″ thick x 24" long shim to one side with three spots of Tite-Bond Quick & Thick. In about ten minutes TB Q&T will be holding well enough. You want the glue to be strong enough to hold the shim in place but not fully set up because you will remove the shim after the shingles are milled. With a thickness planer you can now plane the boards so that they are tapered to 3/4″ thick on one edge and 3/8″ thick on the other side. If your planer has a thickness stop set it at 3/4″. After planing use a small hand saw to cut through the shim on both sides of the glue spots and remove the loose shim. Using a chisel carefully pare the glued shim away. The angled face is the top of the shingle, the square face is the bottom of the shingle. Cut a rabbet 1/2″ wide by 3/8″ deep in bottom face of the 3/4″ thick esge. Do not cut the rabbet in the shingle that is at the outside edge. A saw kerf that is 1/16″ deep should be made on the bottom face of the outside edge shingle 1/4″ in from the edge. This will break the surface tension of any water drops on the edge so they fall off instead of clinging to the bottom surface of the shingle.

    This is an 8 frame gabled roof. The gable has a 3/12 roof pitch (14°). The run of the gable pitch is 8″. The run of the shingles is 9". The top shingle is trimmed to 3″ wide, the narrow edge is trimmed away and the cut is angled to match the roof pitch so that the ridge shingles will meet tightly. When the second and third shingle is tucked under the rabbet each shingle has a 3″ reveal and the overhang is 1″. The rabbet provides overlap so water will run down the roof. The shingles are installed from the top down. Place a bead of caulk on the gable and a thin bead of caulk to the rabbet of the shingle. I installed the top shingle with a single brad nail at each end. Then I applied a bead of caulk to the rabbet of the second shingle and slid it under the rabbet and secured it with two brad nails. Then I installed the final shingle, again sliding it under the rabbet. With all the shingles in place I then added more brad nails to securely hold them.

    The gable ends are made from 3/4″ BDX exterior grade plywood while the gable sides are 3/4″ pine. The plywood joins the sides in a 3/8″ deep rabbet so that there are no exposed plywood edges.

    The hive ceiling is 1/2″ BDX plywood inserted into a dado 1-3/4″ from the lower edge. I use a 1-3/4″ skirt because I put my cleat handles 2″ down from the top edge and my vivaldi board ventilation slots are high enough that the 1-3/4″ skirt over-hangs the slot by 1/4″, just enough for a wind break.

    Above the hive ceiling is a 2" thick piece of XPS insulation snug fit in and held in place with Loctite PL300.

    The cedar is finished with boiled linseed oil but I will let it weather from here on.
    Last edited by JConnolly; 05-04-2020 at 02:51 PM.
    Zone 6B

  4. #3
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    Apr 2016
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    Rutland County, Vermont,USA
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    Default Re: There were two things I swore I'd never make again, then this happened yesterday…

    Very nice work. Maybe you can use a utility knife to cut a kerf on the cedar shingle for the water break? Maybe a grinder,cutting wheel would be better. At least you know who to blame for forcing you to make them. We have all said "never again" only to have to say "never again, and this time I really mean it" sometime in the future. J

  5. #4

    Default Re: There were two things I swore I'd never make again, then this happened yesterday…

    JConnolly I like the ones from Home Depot. Better. 4’ long and the legs fold into the frame. By gorilla.

  6. #5
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    Default Re: There were two things I swore I'd never make again, then this happened yesterday…

    I agree those are better stands. But they are also 70 bucks. While I avoid most Harbor Freight Chineseium (I do get their nitrile gloves), for 15 bucks each on sale, not bending all the way to the ground was worth it for me. At that cheap they stay out in the weather in the apiary so I've never folded them back up, they are none the worse for last winter. One is my work platform, the other temporarily has a nuc on it.
    Zone 6B

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    Northeast PA
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    509

    Default Re: There were two things I swore I'd never make again, then this happened yesterday…

    Quote Originally Posted by JConnolly View Post
    • I once said I'd never make a gabled hive top roof again. Mainly because you can't flip a gabled roof over on the ground to stack boxes on. Then I got me a couple of these things on a 50% sale and now I don't have to bend over as much to pick the boxes back up. I'm happy with the way this one turned out, but I forgot to do one thing, I didn't put a water tension break groove on the overhanging shingle. This top is insulated with 2" XPS and is intended to be used with a perspex inner cover, right now its sitting on a Vivaldi board.


    • Frames are a hassle to make when they are so inexpensive. I needed to make some short frames for a quad mini-mating nuc. Since I was making short top and bottom bars, I went ahead and made side bars. I remember now why they are a hassle to make.
    Gabled roofs are picturesque. For an apiary on someone elses property, I prefer to show off pleasant looking beehives with gabled roofs, rather than multi colored hunks of wood.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Default Re: There were two things I swore I'd never make again, then this happened yesterday…

    Quote Originally Posted by username00101 View Post
    Gabled roofs are picturesque.
    My wife agrees with you. Four of my Langstroth hives now have gabled roofs, the rest are conventional flat roofs. She says they look a lot better. She said that in a way that after more than 30 years of marriage I know that she really means that she thinks I should make them all like that. If you've been married a long time then you know that way.

    You can see part of the hive of a split that I just made behind the gabled hive top in the picture with a weathered flat roof. The rest of that hive in the background is brand new, in fact that is the box I posted about here in the thread about the box joint jig. That weathered flat top looks kind of shabby but the flat top is a lot more utilitarian. To the left in my picture you can see the corner of my now unused Warre, another hive that my wife says is more picturesque.

    Sitting to the right of the gabled roof just out of the picture but on the same hive stand are some mating nucs and then a hive at the end of the stand with a flat insulated PVC hive top. Below that insulated PVC top is a transparent perspex inner cover. I've been experimenting with a transparent inner cover for a full season now. I liked it for the winter because I could check on the health and food condition of that hive in cold weather without breaking the seal. The insulated top kept condensation from forming. I never saw any condensation on the perspex. That colony was an August queen in a nuc last fall and wintered in an 8 frame deep, then exploded and has been split already this year. So I'm going to add another transparent perspex inner cover and that was what prompted me to build another insulated hive top.
    Last edited by JConnolly; 05-05-2020 at 12:02 PM.
    Zone 6B

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Northeast PA
    Posts
    509

    Default Re: There were two things I swore I'd never make again, then this happened yesterday…

    Quote Originally Posted by JConnolly View Post
    My wife agrees with you. Four of my Langstroth hives now have gabled roofs, the rest are conventional flat roofs. She says they look a lot better. She said that in a way that after more than 30 years of marriage I know that she really means that she thinks I should make them all like that. If you've been married a long time then you know that way.

    You can see part of the hive of a split that I just made behind the gabled hive top in the picture with a weathered flat roof. The rest of that hive in the background is brand new, in fact that is the box I posted about here in the thread about the box joint jig. That weathered flat top looks kind of shabby but the flat top is a lot more utilitarian. To the left in my picture you can see the corner of my now unused Warre, another hive that my wife says is more picturesque.

    Sitting to the right of the gabled roof just out of the picture but on the same hive stand are some mating nucs and then a hive at the end of the stand with a flat insulated PVC hive top. Below that insulated PVC top is a transparent perspex inner cover. I've been experimenting with a transparent inner cover for a full season now. I liked it for the winter because I could check on the health and food condition of that hive in cold weather without breaking the seal. The insulated top kept condensation from forming. I never saw any condensation on the perspex. That colony was an August queen in a nuc last fall and wintered in an 8 frame deep, then exploded and has been split already this year. So I'm going to add another transparent perspex inner cover and that was what prompted me to build another insulated hive top.
    What's the exact material you use for the see-through inner cover?

  10. #9
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    Default Re: There were two things I swore I'd never make again, then this happened yesterday…

    I'm using .08″ clear acrylic sheet. They have it at Lowes. It's a couple bucks less than a purchased inner cover. They will cut it to size for you, just give them the exterior box dimensions.

    19-7/8″ long X 16-14″ wide for 10 frame, or 14″ wide for a Mann-Lake 8 frame and 13-3/4″ wide for other 8 frame.

    edit to add: I think the clear inner covers are only advisable for winter if you have an insulated cover. They are not moisture permeable so you have to prevent condensation and have a means for excess humidity to escape.
    Last edited by JConnolly; 05-05-2020 at 01:40 PM.
    Zone 6B

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