Cut Out Question From a Noob - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    San Diego, CA- USA
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Cut Out Question From a Noob

    Quote Originally Posted by IAmTheWaterbug View Post
    Once they start building/repairing comb, you'll start seeing them drag the rubber bands out the front door
    I was wondering about how to handle that actually. I had placed many of rubber bands on there prior to checking the hive, just to have them ready. So there's a lot.

    I figured that once the comb was strong enough, then I might try simply removing them from the areas that I'm able to, and if that's not practical, then I was hoping the bees would remove them.

    How should I handle this?


    Thanks.
    b1rd
    First Year Backyard Hobbyist-
    (San Diego Ca.- Zone 10a)

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    5,036

    Default Re: Cut Out Question From a Noob

    Let the bees remove them. If you are lucky, you will actually get to see them drag one out.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    San Diego, CA- USA
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Cut Out Question From a Noob

    Thanks.
    First Year Backyard Hobbyist-
    (San Diego Ca.- Zone 10a)

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Palos Verdes, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,277

    Default Re: Cut Out Question From a Noob

    Painted Peacock Manor, Palos Verdes, CA

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa, USA
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: Cut Out Question From a Noob

    Well Congrats on your removal. I'd say you were successful!! With this being a new swarm the queen is well able to fly still. She could have flown very easily to your hive. With only 2 or 3 small pieces as you show in your picture the queen wasn't laying much so she wouldn't have been very big so you could have missed her very easily. As the queen lays more (1 - 2+ deep boxes) then the queen will be larger and easier to see / find. In 8 days then open them up. It will be interesting for you to see how this swarm hive compares to your packages you get. I also got my start into beekeeping with a cut out. Those were my first bees only I did find the queen after I had set a comb down and didn't see her on the back side of the frame until the bees showed her to me injured on the ground. Major bummer!! Many Many Many lessons learned that first cut-out.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Barbados
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Hey b1rd.. you did a nice job..
    I have done more removal than I can count... In your situation I would have done completly different.
    Seeing it was such a young colony, with easy access.
    Just taken a cardboard box about the same depth as the hive.. pushed up on to the hive.. scraped the comb off with a paint scaper.. let drop in the box.
    Once all the comb is removed
    Placed the box next to where the hive was and observe. You would know you have queen by bees retuning to box.
    Wait about 15 minutes. Cover with a sheet. Take cardboard box home.
    Place all the bees in a nuc box, dump, melt the wax.. let the girls start over.
    I never feed my bees sugar water. It is junk food, destroying gut flora.
    Let the girls build small cell comb In harmony with nature..you will not have problems with small cell comb.
    Once the bees are truly regressed to small cell.. other beekeeps will see and claim they are africanized.😜
    You can smile

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa, USA
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: Cut Out Question From a Noob

    One thing I forgot to mention. . . I don't use rubber bands but do use plastic mesh. Check out this video. I found this to work very well and it actually kind of clamps the comb in place. I like it better than rubber bands. I got the idea from a video of Geoff's early in my beekeeping history. Check out this video. . .
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpLdLpMLeek

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Barbados
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Cut Out Question From a Noob

    and I forgot to mention.. do this removal as early as possible.. at Dawn.. then you get all the foragers at home.

    As to the vid that delber posted.. why go to all that trouble at the site.. That box looked like you could just carry it away. Instead of losing all those foragers .. get there at dawn and cover the hive with a sheet .. put in car and drive away.. In my case I would not be in any hurry to remove them from the box.. just put the box in the apiary on top of a normal hive box.. let them move down and in six months do a split. or do the removal of the comb. the bees I deal with .. about 50% of the time doing that removal as he did.. the bee would abscond.

    also just build these swarm catching frames.. they can be reused and are really simple to use on site. Thank Dee Lusby for the information.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa, USA
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: Cut Out Question From a Noob

    When I do a cut out I first get an idea on how big the hive is if at all possible. Then I staple the plastic mesh to the one side and the bottom bar on the same side. Then put it in an empty hive box ready to go. Once I'm doing the cut-out all I need to do is get the piece of comb in place setting it on the frame with the stapled side down, pull the mesh up and over staple it to the top bar and I'm off. Then later I can remove the mesh and leave that "normal" frame in the hive and not have a special frame that I've needed to make.

    As in all things there are many different ways to successfully do the same thing. My encouragement is to gather ideas and perhaps try some and do what works for you. I know of people that swear by the rubber bands. For me I just don't like them at all. To each his own!!

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    San Diego, CA- USA
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Cut Out Question From a Noob

    Thanks again for all of the replies. I've learned a lot form several of the suggestions.

    (We were even offered another job for a free bee removal, but neither of us had the room so we passed. However, I did buy a couple more mediums, as I hope to have a second hive if possible. I also bought a "Pro Nuc" to use if needed for the next time.)


    We opened the hive for the first time today. The bees were my find, but it's his property and his beehive, so his bees and rules. (I wanted to check it sooner)

    First, I forgot to mention that we failed to replace the inner cover on the first night when we took the bees home, and we meant to do that sooner. We both forgot.

    Today, when I removed the top cover and turned to set it on the ground I saw three sections of comb hanging from the inside of the cover. They were about the same size as the first ones we collected. We caught it before they broke off, however I had the cover slightly away from the hive box and many bees dropped to the ground. I immediately held the cover back over the box while my neighbor collected up as many bees as he could and put them back into the box, then we replaced the outer cover. At that point I got down on my knees and began looking for the queen. Although I don't have a lot of experience, I was looking for stubby wings, an extended abdomen and a bee that was only crawling. I did not see anything that I thought was the queen, but we were in thick grass.

    Neither of us were sure what to do, so we removed the cover, cut the comb off and secured them into three different frames using rubber bands again (but as few as needed this time). This time I used the hive box as a table and laid the comb across the opening while we secured it to a frame. Much easier than trying to do it in the vertical position like before.

    I scrapped the rest of the comb away, then replaced the inner cover, then the outer cover. I did see a handful of bees standing on the edge of some frames fanning their abdomens outwards, which I took as a good sign. I did one last check for the queen, then we sealed it up.

    Hopefully we'll be able to check some frames next week. I might have to do some arm twisting though. I also wish I had some images to show, but both of our hands were full. Too bad because this is very cool when you're new, and I'd love to have more images (to show off!)

    I'm open to any criticisms, and I do have a couple of questions.

    1. What is the normal thing to do when you find comb drawn like that? Is it that taboo to just cut and keep it?

    2. If I had reason to believe the queen was on the ground, what would be a good plan if I'm unable to find her, if the hive is on a 2' stand? I understand the queen will often find her way back home, but can she make it to a hive entrance on a stand?


    Thanks again.
    b1rd
    First Year Backyard Hobbyist-
    (San Diego Ca.- Zone 10a)

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa, USA
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: Cut Out Question From a Noob

    If I had a hive as small as yours I would be putting the comb in also. Regarding the queen. . . If that happens just watch them on the ground. If the queen is there they will let you know. They will cluster around her. If the queen isn't there then they'll all eventually go up to the hive. They will be either at the top if the hive is open or at the entrance and will be fanning to direct everyone where home is. The queen in a small hive has no problem flying so you could expect that they'll direct her to your hive. Give it about 5 days then go in and check for eggs. If you have eggs then you have a queen. Eggs take 3 days to hatch so in 5 all that was there now will have hatched. It will be difficult to see on light comb as you have but look closely down the bottom of the cell and you will see it. Also be careful about moving the frames with the wax that is so soft. After a batch of brood has emerged then it will be much stronger but still not enough to tilt the frame until the comb is attached on at least 3 sides. I use foundationless frames mostly so I have just gotten into the habit of picking the frame straight up rather than tilting it to me I tilt to the frame. I had one frame that was almost a full frame that was only attached on the top bar that had worker brood in all stages come flopping out of the frame as I tipped it too much.

    If you are able please do post some pictures. We would love to see your progress.

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