Lifting hives into a truck
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Metchosin BC, Canada
    Posts
    3

    Default Lifting hives into a truck

    I am thinking to move my backyard hives up into the hills in early July but havenít done it before. What do other people use to lift their hives onto a truck or trailer? Hitch mounted crane? Forced labour? Wondering.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Grand Rapids MI USA
    Posts
    1,649

    Default Re: Lifting hives into a truck

    I used to do just fine with a two wheeled cart and a ramped trailer by myself. Fast forward 10 years the spirit is strong and the body just hurts too much anymore, so I had to implement a beer based barter system for an extra body.
    Rod

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    1,351

    Default Re: Lifting hives into a truck

    I have teenage sons, so forced labor is the answer.
    Zone 6B

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Fargo, North Dakota
    Posts
    291

    Default Re: Lifting hives into a truck

    Using a drop-ramp trailer and a two-wheel dolly, I moved five (5) double-strapped hives (three (3) 8-frame deeps high, some with medium honey supers) about four (4) miles in less than an hour.

    The need to move the hives was immediate because the hives were on the fairgrounds, and the pyrotechnics guild (fireworks) that rented the fairgrounds for a week were afraid their noise would trigger some bee attack.

    It was an easy move; so long as you have the necessary equipment — ratchet straps to secure the hives, moving screens to keep bees inside, trailer, and dolly — never dread the prospect of such a move. Luckily the call to move occurred about 7:30 pm, and the foragers has already returned. I did not wear, or need, a beekeeper suit.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Bellflower,Montgomery County, Mo
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: Lifting hives into a truck

    I just moved my 4 colonies today. I used my trailer and a 2 wheeler. I had double deeps that still had a total of 20 full frames of honey. After sitting around all winter the move kicked my butt. I'm 71 this year. All of the responses before me show you the range of ages of beekeepers here.

    I did the same as JTGaraas. I didn't use a suit when I moved the hives either. When you get to the other end, put your suit on!

    Just wondering why you want to wait until July when your hives are full or are going to do this after you pull your honey?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Metchosin BC, Canada
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Lifting hives into a truck

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Braun View Post
    I just moved my 4 colonies today. I used my trailer and a 2 wheeler. I had double deeps that still had a total of 20 full frames of honey. After sitting around all winter the move kicked my butt. I'm 71 this year. All of the responses before me show you the range of ages of beekeepers here.

    I did the same as JTGaraas. I didn't use a suit when I moved the hives either. When you get to the other end, put your suit on!

    Just wondering why you want to wait until July when your hives are full or are going to do this after you pull your honey?
    We have 2 main nectar flows here on southern Vancouver Island. The first is the blackberry blossom which finishes about the end of June. The second is fireweed which blooms up on the island mountains in the log slash. My house is in a semi rural area with lots of blackberry so I want to leave the hives at home, then harvest that honey and move the hives up to the mountains at the end of June/beginning of July to get the fireweed. That’s the plan but the bees may have other ideas! I decided to go with this hitch mounted crane.

    https://www.princessauto.com/en/deta...ne/A-p8819849e
    Thanks for the input guys.
    Tom

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Fargo, North Dakota
    Posts
    291

    Default Re: Lifting hives into a truck

    Just to add to the story —

    I only had one (1) other occasion to move a hive. I had bought a metal two (2) person hive mover, and enlisted my brother for his assistance. Despite being fully suited, my brother had no desire to move smoothly when he had bees were buzzing close to his ears. The hive-moving device requires people working in tandem, and it did not go smoothly. Hence the resolution to do it alone, even though I was 68 or 69 at the time.

    The bees created no problem at the new site. The hives were placed appropriately, and while the bees were getting used to not moving, I removed the double ratchet strapping, leaving the moving screens in place (and corks in the auger holes we use for ventilation). When everything was ready, I merely walked behind the hives pulling corks and screens in a matter of seconds. They never found me before I was out of there.

    The price on Tsquared’s hitch-mounted crane makes it almost a required tool. It would come in handy for other things too.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Cedar Lake, Indiana, USA
    Posts
    30

    Default Re: Lifting hives into a truck

    Quote Originally Posted by JTGaraas View Post
    Using a drop-ramp trailer and a two-wheel dolly, I moved five (5) double-strapped hives (three (3) 8-frame deeps high, some with medium honey supers) about four (4) miles in less than an hour.

    The need to move the hives was immediate because the hives were on the fairgrounds, and the pyrotechnics guild (fireworks) that rented the fairgrounds for a week were afraid their noise would trigger some bee attack.

    It was an easy move; so long as you have the necessary equipment — ratchet straps to secure the hives, moving screens to keep bees inside, trailer, and dolly — never dread the prospect of such a move. Luckily the call to move occurred about 7:30 pm, and the foragers has already returned. I did not wear, or need, a beekeeper suit.
    Funny how the PGI feared your bees would create a problem. I have heard of more problems being created by the PGI. You were probably the lucky one to get your hives out of harms way. During their convention they proceeded to drop a bomb on one of the fairgrounds buildings as well as a neighboring house.
    Probably much more of a nuisance than a few hives.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    8,226

    Default Re: Lifting hives into a truck

    Armstrong Lift

  11. #10

    Default Re: Lifting hives into a truck

    A strong lift here. But with two but people, with my home pallbearer style mover. Two 2x4s clamping the bottom boxís. With a ratchet strap holding it together.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •