last year's pulled out frames
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Spring Lake MI USA
    Posts
    112

    Default last year's pulled out frames

    Sorting thru frames after storage. I have the good the bad and the ugly. Some are obvious and I just scrape them down (using plastic preformed foundations, rite cell I think). Others are so so. I am not overly concerned about diseases but aware. Last year I just pitched a few boxes worth fearing diseases and such. My philosophy is that I want to continue keeping bees but not if I have to start over totally every year. I lost 1 hive of 4 over the winter. I believe it was due to mites, specifically waiting a bit to long to treat (OAV). The one I lost was late fall actually. Remaining 3 seem good.
    I suppose my question is how to decide what frames I can reuse. Also any insights on cleaning and prepping them Or just let the bees do it

    Thankyou

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Grand Rapids MI USA
    Posts
    1,649

    Default Re: last year's pulled out frames

    As long as your comfortable that the deadouts are disease free (there are plenty pics and info on it and donít be afraid to post them), get as much debris off em wipe down with a bleach solution, even exposure to sun will help. If your in doubt, donít be be afraid to take a hit and burn em.
    Beekeeping is very much like farming, some years you eat bear and some years the bear eats you.
    Rod

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Plumas County, California, USA
    Posts
    276

    Default Re: last year's pulled out frames

    On Randy Oliver's site he has this simple message: "Note, combs and boxes from diseased or “deadout” hives can be reused without sterilization, except for AFB."

    You can find this at http://scientificbeekeeping.com/firs...-for-your-nuc/ about half way down the page at the beginning of the section titled "Problems and Diseases." It's a useful section of the website. You can find disease information in many other places as well.

    However, I had a hive once that probably had nosema and there was lots of dysentery in the hive. Personally, I wouldn't, and didn't, reuse that foundation, though an experienced beekeeper told me the frames (minus foundation and comb) are fine to reuse if cleaned up.
    Year 4
    Zone 7b 3500 ft.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    272

    Default

    What is the purpose of cleaning them?
    We scrape propolis and burr comb off of where it will bother us. I check brood combs for afb scale (have not found any yet), and sort based on how I'll use it.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Spring Lake MI USA
    Posts
    112

    Default dead out analysis

    Treated for mites in fall. OAV. Bees made it thru the winter. About 2 weeks ago the all looked fine on some warmer days. I had sugar on top frames. Also had pollen patties. Hive died in the last few days. Upon inspection I found zero honey left in frames. Combs all cleaned rite up. Number of bees seemed ok maybe slightly low. ALOT of bees were head first fully inside individual cells. I think the hive starved. With plenty of sugar and pollen patties does this sound reasonable? Sugar was on them all winter.
    Appreciate any thoughts. I have put sugar water in other two hives. Michigan. 30 to 50 degree temp swings last few weeks
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  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan, USA
    Posts
    1,166

    Default Re: dead out analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by Tmac View Post
    Treated for mites in fall. OAV. Bees made it thru the winter. About 2 weeks ago the all looked fine on some warmer days. I had sugar on top frames. Also had pollen patties. Hive died in the last few days. Upon inspection I found zero honey left in frames. Combs all cleaned rite up. Number of bees seemed ok maybe slightly low. ALOT of bees were head first fully inside individual cells. I think the hive starved. With plenty of sugar and pollen patties does this sound reasonable? Sugar was on them all winter.
    Appreciate any thoughts. I have put sugar water in other two hives. Michigan. 30 to 50 degree temp swings last few weeks
    Tmac,, good news the frames and comb, it looks good, yes if they had no honey left, they likely starved out. What did the hives weight in the fall? A large cluster can consume a lot of store over the winter. IMO bees can be delayed from starving on sugar but they will not thrive on sugar. Watch the Youtube from Ian Steppler for winter prep. right now bees are turning honey and pollen into bees, as bees hatch there are more mouths to feed. I am close to your location, I like to winter with 8-11 inches of honey over the empty comb, So if a medium is 6 5/8 take away the wood and bee space that is more like 6 inches of honey so 3 more on the top of the box below should suffice.
    Should really evaluate stores in the fall VIA weight or inspection.

    keep in mind in winter bees slowly travel up the comb, some documents suggest, appx 1mm per day they warm the honey under the bee mass and consume it, working their way up. So the thing to understand is during the cold temps the bees do not leave the cluster to go up to the sugar pile collect some and come back. That would be like you walking 100 yards out to the barn naked at 20 below zero to get the eggs. I consider sugar a "back up plan" if honey runs low they can get a little during warm spells. Ideally the bees winter stores is in capped cells over top the cluster.

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