How to inspect with less protective gear - Page 3
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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Bath, Maine, United States
    Posts
    2,727

    Default Re: How to inspect with less protective gear

    GG

    Did not mean to be insensitive. Lost one every year of High School. Not worth the thrill.
    Not to say I did not got away with being pretty stupid myself, just not stop signs.
    It is hard to design a safety net that some will not use as a hammock.

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  3. #42
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Spokane County, Washington, USA
    Posts
    362

    Default Re: How to inspect with less protective gear

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    Hey shinbone, you got bees in those boxes, or did you stack up all your extra supers to make the rest of us jealous?
    Looks like he has a strap attached to his leg, maybe to pull his carcass back when those 200,000 bees let loose on him!
    So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to everyone, and especially to those who are of the household of faith.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,945

    Default Re: How to inspect with less protective gear

    It may be a bungee for a quick escape. Those hives are on a rooftop.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Somerset, NJ
    Posts
    482

    Default Re: How to inspect with less protective gear

    Quote Originally Posted by shinbone View Post
    I always fully suit up and almost always smoke the bees. I want to be able to move through my hives quickly, which, being fully protected allows me to do. And also you never know when an accident might happen or a hive turned pissy. I hardly ever squish a bee, either. Personally, I have never equated working without protection as somehow being a better bee keeper. In fact, I think the opposite is true.

    The only reason I do it is to stay cooler. Don't like to wring out my bee suit after sweating to death in the sun.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Litchfield, Ct, USA
    Posts
    290

    Default Re: How to inspect with less protective gear

    I still don't see how you southerners do it fully suited. I live in Connecticut and sweat to death with my fully ventilated suit (which seems to be hotter than the non-ventilated one when there's no breeze). And that's only with a few hives! Plus the one fully vented suit is way too big. I wish I had the option to try it before buying it.

    I can't do rubber gloves for long as my hands sweat. There's literally a measurable amount of sweat entrapped in the glove when I take them off. I'll use them occasionally if I know I'll be quick. Plus the ones I use tear anyway, so what's the point? I've been trying bare-handed when I think I can get away with it.

    I've been trying different methods and haven't found a good medium yet. I'm thinking of buying just a jacket and veil. I have a zip-on veil, but that doesn't really keep the bees out without the suit it's supposed to zip to.

    Plus, the veil is another obstacle sometimes. With the full ventilated suit I have to wear a baseball cap underneath to keep the screen off my face so I don't get stung in the nose like I have without it. And the screen is visually distracting.

    It's really trial and error, but I don't want to keep spending money on trials after my errors.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,945

    Default Re: How to inspect with less protective gear

    Jimbo, as far as veils go, the Clear-Vu can't be beat. Not sure I could ever use a fencing style veil or anything flimsy. I wear the Brushy Mountain Inspector jacket which is a fairly heavy cotton, almost denim-like material. It is super hot in the summertime and is often drenched when I am done working the hives. Same with the goatskin gloves I wear. Such is life. I have been looking at purchasing a ventilated jacket from Ultra Breeze or trying one from Clearly Sustainable.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
    Posts
    4,224

    Default Re: How to inspect with less protective gear

    I use the over priced veil from the tractor store or orchlens. It is the only real bee cloths I own except for one other pull over smock type that they sell on ebay for around six bucks that my kid got me. I wear the smock when I am doing extra stuff and it used to be all I had. My hive tool is a painters tool (putty knife) which I love. I used to wear hospital gloves but have got away from that. I come in with dirty hands now due to propolus.

    I would like all that other stuff but am to cheap and so just get by. I was really scared and still have a healthy respect (fear) for the bees but think I was lucky for being so cheap cause I have found I really like working in the heat while being almost naked. I would like some emergency clothing but don't know that I would use it now that I am used to what I do.

    I never got stung through the surgical gloves except when I smashed a bee at where the glove had torn but I don't get very many hand stings now either.

    I do get stung once in a while and there are times of year or hive activity where I have a few followers that are threatening and hounding me. It is usually a land on the arm and sting with little warning.

    My disclaimer is that I have stood by two others (different times) when the bees started nailing those guys and paid me no attention. It might be my turn some day but I must smell right (or wrong) to the bees cause so far so good. I do get stung but think the most I ever had at one time was four. I also may not work my small number of bees very hard and might change my tune if I did.

    I am still scared of bees. It is just a hobby for me and that gives quite a bit of latitude to what I think needs done in bad conditions. I am a fair weather bee keeper.
    Cheers
    gww

    Ps the tractor store veil is sorta a sombrero with stretch band that you stick your arms through.
    zone 5b

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Litchfield, Ct, USA
    Posts
    290

    Default Re: How to inspect with less protective gear

    Thanks JW. I'll have to look into the Clear-Vu. I almost think I have an Ultra Breeze full suit (or something really really similar). I can't remember now. It's wicked heavy and hot when there's no breeze, though it looks like it should be "breezy" because it looks pretty porous. I also mistakenly ordered a suit much too large for me (I'm not a small guy), and the thumb elastics have stretched beyond usefulness and are actually a hindrance now.

    I want to try the heavier gauge nitrile gloves a few people here have had success with, along with thin cotton gloves underneath if necessary in place of the times I'd usually use my goatskin gloves (wait....I think what I have are goatskin. I can't remember now).

    Barehanded is definitely great when I know it's sunny and the bees are happy, but I'd still like a good stand-alone veil as the thought of getting stung in the eyeball or having a bee crawling in my earhole doesn't sound fun.

    On a tangent and only semi-related story: I was (semi-drunkenly) showing a now ex (unrelated to this story) one of my hives. I popped open the top cover and lifted and dropped a frame. At least one bee apparently wasn't happy and stung her near her eye even though she was standing several feet back. They didn't bother me at all being the one disturbing them. The next day her eye was swollen shut. I'd like to think that they were trying to tell me something.

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,945

    Default Re: How to inspect with less protective gear

    That is funny, in a somewhat twisted way. Good thing she is an ex whatever. Hope you got a photo with the eye all swollen to remember her by. I have heard of dogs not approving of a person, but bees?
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

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