Moving splits
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Thread: Moving splits

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Ocala, Florida, USA
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    Default Moving splits

    How long should splits be moved before moving them back to the parent hive bee yard?

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Moving splits

    As long as it takes for the original foraging aged bees to die off, typically two to three weeks. Moving new spilts is preferable but not required. I have done fairly well leaving the splits in the same yard. You must manage for robbing though. Do you already have an outyard?
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  4. #3
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    Mar 2015
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    Ocala, Florida, USA
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    Default Re: Moving splits

    I moved them from one yard to another, about 20 miles. I typically move splits from one yard to another yard but I need to get them back to the location of the parent hives to catch the willow flow that is going strong. I planning to move them at night and place them in a different location on the property but itís only 10 acres. I guess Iíll find out how it works and report back.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
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    Stevens Point, WI
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    228

    Default Re: Moving splits

    hmmm....I've moved splits home for a few days and then back with little issue..... Bees don't have that kind of elephant memory....they orient to a new location and forget about the old location if brought back.
    Help is here to never misplace that hive tool again: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvwlSiOzgOU

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    England, UK
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    1,809

    Default Re: Moving splits

    With the exception of drone hives, I operate within just the one yard - zero problems providing anti-robbing screens are deployed. I like to place new colonies on old stands whenever possible to benefit from returning foragers.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Pepperell, MA.
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    6,169

    Default Re: Moving splits

    I rarely move splits beyond the few feet or yards from the original location. Yes, I do on a very occasional basis get heavy drifting but it's so seldom that I don't let it worry me.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Isle of Wight, VA
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    Default Re: Moving splits

    I don't move my splits out of my yard, but then my boxes are painted all sorts of different colors and the splits are moved into the perennial flower garden so as soon as the bees come out, they know the landscape has changed and re-orient to the new hive.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
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    8,192

    Default Re: Moving splits

    If you use the Doolittle method for splitting...The frames of brood and honey are remove from the colony...all bees are shaken off into the parent hive. The split is located above an excluder, overnight. One good comb of open brood must be in split. Bees repopulate the split with young bees. They don't fly home. If just the 5 frames of the split are located above the excluder, the bees will cover the combs. If the box above the excluder is filled with combs, the split population will be greater.

  10. #9
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    Apr 2017
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    Default Re: Moving splits

    I will be following that routine as I try to populate my styrofoam mating nucs this year. Last year was a disaster with getting enough bees to remain and I lost several newly emerged queens. This year I intend to get some brood in the mini frames first and then do the 24 hour qe trick to get enough bees for the nucs.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  11. #10
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    Aug 2013
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    Default Re: Moving splits

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    I will be following that routine as I try to populate my styrofoam mating nucs this year. Last year was a disaster with getting enough bees to remain and I lost several newly emerged queens. This year I intend to get some brood in the mini frames first and then do the 24 hour qe trick to get enough bees for the nucs.
    Did you close up the mini styro nucs for 24 hrs in a cool location? they should of stayed put after that.

  12. #11
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    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Moving splits

    I did, but only three out of eight stayed put and one of those did not have the queen return. Read somewhere that 72 hrs in a cool dark location is better, but last year was my first with this style so there is still much for me to learn. I close up my walk away splits for 24 hours but still have any foragers go back home. Which of course brings us back to why moving splits is better than leaving them in the same yard if you are just moving frames and not selecting for the age of the bee.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Linton, IN, USA
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    3

    Default

    I've been making splits for many years and selling nucs and split in the same yard and dont move them to a differant yard I might even set it with in a couple of feet of the hive I split it from if you do it right your objective is to have enough nurse bees to cover and take care of the brood and have resources in the hive. yes you will lose some foragers but thats of no concern the bood being taken care of is and I've done very well doing this hope that helps.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    woodland, wa usa
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    73

    Default Re: Moving splits

    Absolutely totally depends on the "split". If it is a split with the old queen taken from the mother hive, that split can be set right beside the mother hive with no problem whatsoever. Understand, field bees will return to the familiar/known location. Nurse bees haven't been out of the hive so once they are flying they'll return to where they left.

    Me, I don't bother moving my splits out of the apiary then back again. I'll have an appropriate amount of bees and brood in the split off, and will move the split off to a different part of the apiary in the cool evening when all are inside, and I'll place an obstacle in from of the entrance forcing them to relocate.

    But having only from 5-15 hives, I'm near never doing a 50/50 split. I split off queens and 1-few frames so queenless mother hive can/will carry on basic duties as well as make their new queen.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Winchester, Wyoming
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    84

    Default Re: Moving splits

    With my only split thus far, which happened to be successful....I split to an adjacent hive box, less than 2 feet away. The split was successful, so I had to find another way to kill them off! ��. memtb

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
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    349

    Default Re: Moving splits

    Same. Only move my splits a few feet in most cases. I make sure to find my queen and shake a lot of extra bees into the split. Nurse bees won't fly back, foragers will. You may not notice a lot of activity for a few days in the split because of this, but they will be just fine as long as you get enough nurse bees.

    I do the same thing with my queen castles and mating nucs. Shake bees in from brood frames and notice very little drift back.

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Bourg, Louisiana
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    17

    Default Re: Moving splits

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnmyke View Post
    Same. Only move my splits a few feet in most cases. I make sure to find my queen and shake a lot of extra bees into the split. Nurse bees won't fly back, foragers will. You may not notice a lot of activity for a few days in the split because of this, but they will be just fine as long as you get enough nurse bees.

    I do the same thing with my queen castles and mating nucs. Shake bees in from brood frames and notice very little drift back.
    This is what I do also. I have done splits literally side by side and had great success.

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