nuc sales agreement - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Stafford, Virginia
    Posts
    316

    Default Re: nuc sales agreement

    Nuc customers are the most difficult and demanding people in my opinion. I have had them call me six months later after the Nuc swarmed and ask for a refund. After a bad year, I talked with Bob Harvey and now do it more the way he does or did. I have them come and pick out there own Nuc. This has dropped complaints to near zero. People see the pictures of great nucs that people build and expect that when they buy there are 5 frames of brood, etc. It doesn't help that there are different ways to sell Nucs. Some sell 3, 4, or 5 frame and people still expect perfection, because afterall, you are a commercial beekeeper, a god in the beekeeping world.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Scott county, Arkansas, Usa
    Posts
    1,603

    Default Re: nuc sales agreement

    Written agreements protect both sides.
    Clearly describe the minimum contents of the nucs.. I have never had a complaint from a customer for exceeding the minimum.

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Edmonton, AB, Canada
    Posts
    59

    Default Re: nuc sales agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by grozzie2 View Post
    In our part of the world, spring nucs are sold as 4 frames units. If I was going to make nucs from a colony, here is how I would do it. I start by walking out to the double deep wintered colony carrying 2 4 frame boxes. I pick thru the frames of the wintered colony, each of the boxes gets 3 frames with brood, one with pollen / honey. Bees are shaken into the bottom box off of all the frames except the one with the queen. Frame with queen goes into one of the two 4 frame boxes. Now excluder goes on top of the deep left in place with all the bees, and the two 4 frames go above the excluder. Lid over those.

    Come back the next day with two caged queens. Take two nucs off the top, one is wintered queen with bees that are her offspring, and brood in all stages, pretty much the definition of a wintered nuc. The other 4 frame box has brood in all stages, gets one of the caged queens. The bottom box now gets the other caged queen.

    Net result, one wintered nuc to sell, one spring nuc to sell, and the leftover bees in a box with a queen, they can build up a colony over the summer to do it all again next spring. In a couple more days the queens will be out of the cages, we go thru pulling out empty cages and confirm there are eggs. At that point, nucs are ready to go. If we were rushed when pulling cages, you may well see a couple empty queen cages in the grass, but they will end up in a pocket or bucket by the end of the day.
    Can second Grozzie's comment. Had the option of buying nucs with my choice of new queen or overwintered queen from a local supplier here.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Canandaigua, New York, USA
    Posts
    40

    Default

    I might buy some spring splits ( my terminology) from an old timer this spring. He does his splits in April to combat swarming. He's up front, says he'll only know what he's got come April and he only wants 100$ a split. He's been at this along time and I keep my mouth shut and just listen.... Wished I could have met him sooner.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Chicago, ILL. USA
    Posts
    322

    Default Re: nuc sales agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by grozzie2 View Post
    If I was going to make nucs from a colony, here is how I would do it. I start by walking out to the double deep wintered colony carrying 2 4 frame boxes. I pick thru the frames of the wintered colony, each of the boxes gets 3 frames with brood, one with pollen / honey. Bees are shaken into the bottom box off of all the frames except the one with the queen. Frame with queen goes into one of the two 4 frame boxes. Now excluder goes on top of the deep left in place with all the bees, and the two 4 frames go above the excluder. Lid over those.
    Roughly, what time of the year are you doing this in your area?

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Chicago, ILL. USA
    Posts
    322

    Default Re: nuc sales agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by matt1954 View Post
    After a bad year, I talked with Bob Harvey and now do it more the way he does or did. I have them come and pick out there own Nuc.
    Often enough I let people know that they are welcomed to stop by and make their own nucs. I tell them that anything in this or that hive is up for grabs in making up a nuc. Usually the ones who are the most "demanding" before purchasing the nuc are the first ones to give up and ask for help in selecting the right frames. I only sell 20-30 nucs per year, so can dedicate the time for these individual nuc making sessions.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
    Posts
    1,798

    Default Re: nuc sales agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcin View Post
    Roughly, what time of the year are you doing this in your area?
    Early to mid May is when most folks are doing spring splits to make nucs around here. A lot of the timing is driven by the availability of queens.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    225

    Default

    We sell overwinetered nucs and spring nucs. Overwintered nucs are obvious: last summer's split overwintered, with 2-3 brood, 1-2 food, 0-1 foundation/part drawn/empty comb to give me a bit of time before they swarm. Spring nucs are the same but have a purchased queen that was introduced 4-7 weeks before sale, so all brood is hers and I know her pattern before nuc is released. For beginners I take the time to make the nuc with them so they learn confidence and how to inspect. They also see the queen. For experienced beekeepers they can come early or late and I'll close the nuc for them so they get the foragers, or they can come during the day and inspect their own nuc before they take it. The apiary is inspected so we can sell legally. It's their responsibility once they leave my property. I've never had any complaints. And I'm not moving thousands of nucs (yet!).
    Just my opinion but I would not call grozzies 2nd "nuc" a "nuc." I'd call it a split that was done a few days ago so I can verify eggs. At that point I don't know yet if she's a drone layer. I have gotten a number of those over the years and would not want to sell them. I would not make any guarantees beyond: state health certificate and it had a good laying queen when it left my property. I have not gotten to the point of letting a customer inspect random nucs until they find the one they want. I'd be worried about my queens....

  10. #29
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Liberty, IN
    Posts
    418

    Default Re: nuc sales agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    A sales agreement? I agree to sell you a nuc which consists of a laying queen, bees, and brood. You agree not to kill them.
    With what delivery date? And where's the recourse for failure to do so? Is highest percentage of problem!
    "Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds" Albert Einstein

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Venango/Crawford Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,718

    Sold Out Re: nuc sales agreement

    Quote Originally Posted by bob393 View Post
    I have a customer that wants to see my sales agreement before I sell her some nucs this spring.
    I don't have a sales agreement.

    Does anyone use on and if so could I take a look at it so I can get an idea of what to include?
    I would tell her... You give me money I give you bees, there's no need to cut down trees and bring paper into this transaction.

    "I am not responsible for them while they are in your care, you are". You might even want that on a sign.


    I find when people start with things like this, they end up being customers that are problem complainer customers. Meaning,

    they are ones to avoid. Reason is people like to complain and will put your business down by complaining to others.

    1 upset customer can do more harm than 100 satisfied customers to doing you good.

    AVOID them like the plague.
    "Where wisdom is called for, force is of little use."
    Herodotus (circa 485-425 BC), Greek Historian

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    225

    Default

    I agree with Tim, However: In Feb or March I tell an estimated date for pickup. I will keep in touch if it is far off but otherwise let them know a week in advance. I want to get 2-3 apiary evaluations in before I sell nucs so I can sell good queens but not my best (which undergo further evaluations for breeders).

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