Beekeeper of the year criteria
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Chicago, ILL. USA
    Posts
    322

    Default Beekeeper of the year criteria

    My local bee club wants to implement a beekeeper/club member of the year award. We're looking for input as to what criteria should be used to determine who gets the award, so that it doesn't turn into a popularity contest. So far our guidelines are pretty straightforward, along the rules set out by ESHPA
    Reached out to the non-beekeeping public to explain the value of honey bees in our lives.

    Be a member in good standing of ESHPA for a minimum of five years.

    Been involved in the beekeeping community, locally, regionally and or nationally.

    Influential in new beekeepers by teaching or mentoring the new beekeeper(s).

    Has contributed in some substantial and positive way to beekeeping in NY.
    If your club/association has a beekeeper of the year wars, what criteria do you use for it? Or what criteria would you like to see being used?

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Catskills, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,850

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    Personally, good intentions, but I don’t think it’s a good idea. You will create a smelting pot of nepotism, and it does turn into a popularity contest, etc., and the hobbyist is forgotten. This come from a former member of ESHPA.
    Proverbs 16:24

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,560

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    Agree with Deb, probably sounds better on paper than it looks in real life.

    If you do decide to go that route, make it a points based system. So many points for each of certain activities related to beekeeping. Community outreach, educational seminars, attending state and regional conventions, etc. Absolutely no voting and nothing to do with number of hives.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Hathaway, CA
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    I agree with both above. In addition such awards typically are focused toward the strengths of extroverts and totally ignore people that are introverts. Thus, at least as postulated in "Quiet" your award may exclude your best beekeepers by virtue its nature....

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Suffolk Co, NY, USA
    Posts
    3,704

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    Marcin> The ESHPA also includes this in their process of BOY nominee info:

    "Some nominee's may not fit into some or all the above criteria and that is ok, we understand that some nominee's are inspirational in their passion of beekeeping or have made such an impact on beekeeping in the State of New York that they must be recognized. These individuals too, would make a great nominee for this award.

    The nominee could be a member of your local branch or Bee club, but does not need to be. You may wish to announce a request for nominations at your beekeeping meetings and in their newsletters. Feel free to contact officers of ESHPA and other local beekeeping organizations to request their suggestions for possible candidates and letters of support.

    The nomination process is easy. Write a letter outlining how the candidate has impacted beekeeping in New York, again examples are reached out to the general public over the years talking about the value of honey bees, been involved in the beekeeping community at different levels and or influential to new beekeepers, or none of the above as there might be a different way they have contributed to beekeeping."


    It is a wonderful idea, so go for it.

    Knowing many of the recipients of the ESHPA BOY (Beekeeper of the Year) award I can say that both introverts and extroverts, men and woman, commercial and hobbyist, long time and relative newcomer beekeeper, honey producers and queen rearers, stationary and migratory, clever and less so, upstate and downstate, suburban and rural, both blowhard and humble beekeepers are all represented.

    Cloverdale>
    If a former ESHPA member can not find pleasure or a fond memory about at least some of the BOY recipients on their list from 1953 to 2018 it says more about the that former member than it does about either the recipients of the BOY award at ESHPA or the process used to select the BOY. Just saying.
    Last edited by clyderoad; 02-13-2020 at 02:34 PM. Reason: clarify

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    8,192

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    The EAS Beekeeper of the Year award

    Divelbiss Award
    At each annual conference, the Eastern Apicultural Society presents the Charles and Evelyn Divelbiss Education Award. This award is presented to that person or couple who has—over a period of years—reached out to the non-beekeeping public to explain the value of honey bees in our lives.
    The nominee does not need to be from your own state or province. You may wish to announce this request for nominations at beekeeping meetings and in their newsletters. Feel free to contact officers of state and local organizations to request their suggestions for possible candidates and letters of support.

    The nomination process is easy. Write a letter outlining how the candidate has reached the general public over the years. Groups, such as 4-H clubs, Scouting organizations, school groups, community organizations, Lions Clubs, and garden clubs, as well as media interviews and exhibits at county and state fairs, qualify as non-beekeeping public.

    Although the main criteria is edification of the general public, the letter may also include activities that teach Short Courses and other instructional work toward educating beekeepers and prospective beekeepers. The nominee does not need to be a member of EAS (but the Society would be delighted if the recipient would join).
    The deadline for submissions is April 30th. Nominations and letters of support should be emailed to [email protected].

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    1,812

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    My concern wouldn't be so much about the criteria used - although it would always be nice to see some recognition of those who are generous with their time and their assistance towards others - but rather about the mechanism which is to be used to choose 'the winner'. Some form of voting perhaps ? A committee decision ? To me that smells of internal politics.
    My heart sags at such a thought.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    8,192

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    Something that brought tears to my eyes and a lump in my throat. Still does when I read it. Even when I was asked to sit at the head table and wear a shirt with a collar I didn't have a clue. I'm a bit shy to post this, but it is something that has deeply effected me.


    The 2018 Divelbiss Award
    by Dewey M. Caron
    At each annual conference, the Eastern Apicultural Society presents the Charles and Evelyn Divelbiss Education Award. This award is presented to a person or couple who has - over a period of years - reached out to the non-beekeeping public to explain the value of honey bees in our lives.
    This year’s recipient has promoted beekeeping and the value of bees to agriculture and the environment to the general public and to new beekeepers for over four decades.
    His early experiences with public education concerning the value of honey bees occurred in grade school classrooms while his children were young.
    He has been an instructor at introductory beekeeping classes for those interested in beekeeping as a hobby and has coordinated and participated in numerous workshops and short courses that target experienced beekeepers in order to better their bee management.
    He has been a member of his state’s Pollinator Protection Committee where his insight as a commercial beekeeper acquainted with local farming practices has made him an invaluable member of the committee. His input was critical in educating the non-beekeeper committee members about the issues affecting bees while being sensitive to the needs of farmers who allow beekeepers to locate apiaries on their farms. He continues to work on
    the state and local level to educate people on the importance of land to support foraging for the honey bees as well as reducing the use of herbicides and pesticides.
    He has influenced thousands of people during his beekeeping career by way of bee exhibits, honey shows, seminars, workshops and short courses. He has written thousands of posts on online beekeeping discussion forums, patiently answering questions and contributing his deep experience to the ongoing discussion. His positive influence is global having given presentations related to bees and beekeeping throughout the US, Canada, Mexico, Great Britain and New Zealand. He has also educated countless individuals via YouTube.
    He is never shy about sharing his experiences so that other beekeepers may have the same success he has. For an individual who is so busy during the beekeeping season,
    he always finds a way to take the time to help others and offer guidance. Some beekeepers are secretive and protective of their methods. He enjoys seeing others succeed and is always willing to share his experience and insight. His passion and enthusiasm for beekeeping is infectious.
    He has been a member of his state bee association and the EAS Board of Directors and a driving force
    in the continuation of the EAS Honey Show. He
    has helped draft local beekeeping ordinances in several area towns and cities. He was instrumental in developing and administering his state association’s queen rearing grant and teaching a new generation of queen breeders in the state.
    Mike Palmer continues the tradition of Vermont being represented by innovative, dedicated and intelligent beekeepers who’s influence reaches well beyond the humble borders of our small state. Mike has entered the world stage of beekeeping and continues the tradition of applying Yankee common sense to this age-old science. To be a great teacher you need to be a great student and he will be the first to tell you that his knowledge has been gleaned from the likes of Brother Adam, Charley Mraz Sr. and many others that took the time to write and pass
    on their vast experience. Some beekeepers become recluse and others covet their knowledge as if it
    is a competitive advantage, but great beekeepers concern themselves with the success of the bees. Mike Palmer is one of these beekeepers.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Suffolk Co, NY, USA
    Posts
    3,704

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    That's pretty nice Mike, I can see why you'd be touched.
    Seems well deserved too!

    Breeding from #69, #78, #75 this spring.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    425

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    Congratulations, Mike! That's a well-deserved award, and a well-written encomium.


  12. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Catskills, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,850

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    Proverbs 16:24

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Catskills, Delaware Cty, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,850

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    Cloverdale>
    If a former ESHPA member can not find pleasure or a fond memory about at least some of the BOY recipients on their list from 1953 to 2018 it says more about the that former member than it does about either the recipients of the BOY award at ESHPA or the process used to select the BOY. Just saying.

    Unfortunately I didn’t have any good experience/good memories the first 2 years when I was a new beekeeper, and saw firsthand my opinions as I stated above, so I did not join again. If I was younger I would have popped that guy right in the nose. I don’t like bullies. You can say what you want, that’s your opinion and experience. Deb
    Proverbs 16:24

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Chicago, ILL. USA
    Posts
    322

    Default Re: Beekeeper of the year criteria

    Thanks for the feedback everyone. One way we've been thinking about how to implement the nomination/voting process is to provide index cards ( either stamped with club logo, or signed by one of the board members ) to each member. We use lanyards for nametags at each meeting. That way each member will get a single card for nomination and we can eliminate double voting by the same member(s).

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •