Treated lumber for hive stand - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    6,895

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    I use it all the time. This is my latest heavy duty version for a new client. 6X6 PT on deck blocks lightly tied together with Timberlock screws. I make them this strong to irritate my friend Charlie.


    All of my opinions and suggestions are based on my five decades of actual beekeeping,
    not so much on book learning, watching YouTube videos nor reading internet sites.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Sedgwick Co. KS
    Posts
    1,183

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    I've always use treated lumber for my stands with no problem. IMG_0281.JPG

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    6,176

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    I wouldn't even blink using treated material. All my hives are on stands that I've made with treated lumber. Even if there was a small amount of chemical rising off the wood I think it would pale in contrast to the amount of chemicals the bees are exposed to when they forage and in the foods they bring back to the colony.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  5. #24
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,166

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    Quote Originally Posted by odfrank View Post
    I use it all the time. This is my latest heavy duty version for a new client. 6X6 PT on deck blocks lightly tied together with Timberlock screws. I make them this strong to irritate my friend Charlie.


    Yes, because you’ll need these big beams to support the honey weight of those hives!
    My opinions are based on whatever OD Frank says because he thinks he knows everything!

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,620

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie B View Post
    Yes, because you’ll need these big beams to support the honey weight of those hives!
    Sounds reasonable to me
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,166

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    Please do not encourage him JW!
    My opinions are based on whatever OD Frank says because he thinks he knows everything!

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bristol,MA,USA
    Posts
    853

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    Beek 58 yrs. Would not use treated wood at all with my bees. The effects are extremely subtle. More susceptibility to diseases, general weakness in productivity in comparison to the prior usage without treated wood. Been there done that with over 350 hives. The best advice offered is to use cinder blocks or bricks. As you will grow older, your strength to remove the heavy supers will diminish noticeably, the higher the stands the more difficult it will become to remove the heavy supers. The lower they are the more you will be able to avoid extra help for just a little while longer. OMTCW

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    White Hall, MD
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    I don't know if these products would work for ground contact, probably not. However for all other wood supports, hive bodies, etc this is, I believe, great stuff.

    We have used both,

    TALL EARTH ECO-SAFE WOOD TREATMENT
    TallEarth.com

    and/or

    ECO WOOD TREATMENT
    www.ecowoodtreatment.com

    They come in powder form, about $20 for a bag to make 1 gallon. Mix with water, seems very thin in the application and runny so you can't load the brush up, take your time in applying while listening to "Inna-Gadda-da-Vida". It may look like you haven't done a good job. Don't worry, just be sure you have fully moistened all surfaces, let it dry for a day or two. Once out in the sun and rain, will begin to take on a most interesting tinted patina and finally "aging" to a dark tone that highlights the grain of the wood. Have used it for years.
    As with all advice, look it up, do your research and be sure you are comfortable with what it is. I believe it is quite safe for bees and does not need regular reapplication for a long time.

    DH

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    1,234

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    Quote Originally Posted by Cedar Hill View Post
    As you will grow older, your strength to remove the heavy supers will diminish noticeably…
    I'm also 58, Are you sure? I certainly do not feel older or in worse shape. Are you sure it is not because gravity has gotten noticeably stronger the last few years?
    Zone 6B

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,620

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    Quote Originally Posted by JConnolly View Post
    I'm also 58, Are you sure? I certainly do not feel older or in worse shape. Are you sure it is not because gravity has gotten noticeably stronger the last few years?
    59 myself. I can say with absolute authority that the days have gotten longer and the nights have gotten shorter in the past 40 years. The increase in the earth's gravitational pull does not help either.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bristol,MA,USA
    Posts
    853

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    LOL, been a beek for 58 yrs. am 83. Have noticed that the bloom on wild fruit trees and other blooming trees has increased quite noticeably within the last decade, maybe simultaneous with the human depredation of the Amazon forests ("The Lungs of the earth" as my fourth grade teacher used to repeatedly tell us). Increase in CO2 resulting. Older orchardists must be noticing this phenomena. OMTCW

  13. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
    Posts
    1,802

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    59 myself. I can say with absolute authority that the days have gotten longer and the nights have gotten shorter in the past 40 years. The increase in the earth's gravitational pull does not help either.
    Well this is all easily explained. Everybody knows that the amount of gravity exerted by mother earth is directly related to her overall mass. What most dont know is the mother earth is gaining mass every day, and not by just a little bit.

    https://www.popsci.com/60-tons-cosmi...rth-every-day/

    I can well attest to that increase in gravity, I've observed it myself. There are many things that were an easy one hand pick up when I was in my early 20's, and today as I turn the corner past 60, they are two hands and a grunt to pick up that same item. I consider that definitive proof that gravity has gotten much stronger over the intervening 40 years.....

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    IMG_0708.jpg this hive has been ground contact for 5 years. so far so good. treated and painted.

  15. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: Treated lumber for hive stand

    Quote Originally Posted by Rww930 View Post
    IMG_0708.jpg this hive has been ground contact for 5 years. so far so good. treated and painted.
    sorry about sideways photo oops

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