Bees bringing in lots of pollen (?); what plant(s) could it be? - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    226

    Default

    Not so bad here 1950: 10F and windy with snow on the ground. They must be on something good.... But seriously, pics of your pollen baskets would help. Words for colors are notoriously suspect. Mauve? Peach? I dunno! And pics would make us northerners even more jealous too! 🙂

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: Bees bringing in lots of pollen (?); what plant(s) could it be?

    I've kept records for many years, and it is not too unusual to see maples in early January. I recall notes as early as January 8th. Note that this in not widespread blooming, but in key locations maple usually kicks off before the beginning of February. I'm in the Hampton Roads area, so we're a bit more moderate than those further west. This year it was early January.
    I agree with AstroBee, My bees were bringing in loads of the pale grey/tanish pollen from some early red maples early January. IMO, blooms are closer to 3 weeks early compared to past couple of years. I added boxes 2 weeks ago to most hives as they had drones already walking in hives along with big patches of drone brood. Have not seen any drones flying yet here in Northern Chesapeake, VA.
    Last edited by v-beebud; 02-17-2020 at 04:13 PM.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    carney, maryland, USA
    Posts
    1,293

    Default Re: Bees bringing in lots of pollen (?); what plant(s) could it be?

    @V-beebud: DRONES! That's good to hear. Today the bees are bringing in chickenfeed again. They might be bringing in pollen also, but the red and silver maples in my yard and neighborhood are close, but are not blooming yet.

    The colony in our yard seems to have a lot of bees in it, so I need to do a split if there are drones around, or get a mated queen. I'm probably 2-3 weeks behind you weatherwise, so I will be looking for drones the last week in February.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Chesapeake, VA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: Bees bringing in lots of pollen (?); what plant(s) could it be?

    Quote Originally Posted by Amibusiness View Post
    Not so bad here 1950: 10F and windy with snow on the ground. They must be on something good.... But seriously, pics of your pollen baskets would help. Words for colors are notoriously suspect. Mauve? Peach? I dunno! And pics would make us northerners even more jealous too! 🙂
    This was January 11, not one of my strongest, but this is only video I took then. First attempt at attaching, sorry if I fail

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Isle of Wight, VA
    Posts
    2,823

    Default Re: Bees bringing in lots of pollen (?); what plant(s) could it be?

    Quote Originally Posted by v-beebud View Post
    Have not seen any drones flying yet here in Northern Chesapeake, VA.
    I saw drones flying outside my topbar hives in Smithfield Virginia on February 7. Earliest that I can remember. Inspections of some hives showed the queens actively laying drones in the larger cells (I'm all foundationless and rear queens, so I'm OK with this). One overwintered hive will need to have some combs and bees removed this afternoon to keep it out of swarm mode (if it doesn't already have queen cells in it). It sure does feel like things are 3 weeks early in Hampton Roads, but then there is forecast for a dusting of snow on Thurs night too.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    carney, maryland, USA
    Posts
    1,293

    Default Re: Bees bringing in lots of pollen (?); what plant(s) could it be?

    Almost 60F here today. The bees are bringing in light tan material, which I am pretty sure is chicken feed from our neighbor. I opened the top to see how much they are going through the 4# of sugar I added last Sunday. There was quite a bit of heat coming up through the frames, so I think this queen has been laying for the last 4-5 weeks. This winter has been tough, as this is the only survivor of 6 colonies going into winter. Typically, my survival rate has been 50-75% over the last 3 years.

    Regarding the up and down night-time temps, I decided to wrap my hive 2 weeks ago. I have a 2 inch wide bottom entrance and have a screened vent at the top; Normally I don't wrap my hives, but I was suspicious that there was a lot of open brood, and not a whole lot of nurse bees to protect it. With cold temps forecast for later this week, I was tempted but decided against doing an inspection today. Anyway, the bees still have about 3 pounds of sugar on top.

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