Honey extractor choices - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    1,472

    Default Re: Honey extractor choices

    I am doing the 2x4 under the back leg and also putting a trouble light inside the extractor with the lid closed so as to warm the honey. It is a bit of a pain to the remove the basket and wash out the drum but the only way to fully clean.

    The sloped bottom with a well at the front and a heat source below looked like a better design than a conical bottom.
    Zone 3b. If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got!

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR, USA
    Posts
    56

    Default Re: Honey extractor choices

    Quote Originally Posted by mgolden View Post
    Joerg, I saw a neat extractor design at a Hutterite Colony. They had built it themselves. Stainless steel.

    The collection area below the frames in the extractor was a flat sloped floor, higher at the back. At the front was a small well and the valve was threaded into it. Heating elements was installed below the floor, so the sloped floor could be heated to ?105F.

    I think it would function quite a bit better than a inverted cone bottom. I can never get the perimeter of the cone to fully drain and eventually get a build up of crystalized honey on the perimeter.
    Set your extractor tank where bees can get to it and you won't have to worry about build up of honey, they are very good at cleaning up.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, Florida
    Posts
    164

    Default Re: Honey extractor choices

    Quote Originally Posted by mgolden;
    I am doing the 2x4 under the back leg and also putting a trouble light inside the extractor with the lid closed so as to warm the honey. It is a bit of a pain to the remove the basket and wash out the drum but the only way to fully clean.
    When cleaning extractor, use cold water. My extractor was fastened to the floor of the honey house. I used pvc pipes and connectors to run the drainage outside and used my strainer to catch the wax and let the water run on the grass. Use cold water with a hose and if you want, you can use a spray gun to blast the honey and wax out. After the tub and basket are cleaned then you can use hot water to kinda sanitize the inside of the extractor.

    This is just one way to clean the equipment. I supposed you realize that honey is water soluble and washes right on out. Being as you are using cold water, the wax will not melt and smear on the basket and inside of the tub.The wax that I save will go in with the other wax I am cleaning.

    Hope this helps old and new beekeepers in how to. There are other ways, but this is my way. Enjoy God's miracle little insects.
    Peaches
    The Beekeepers Friend

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    6,168

    Default Re: Honey extractor choices

    I have the Maxant 3100P and love it. I've mounted it to a base with wheels so that it only rocks gently while extracting...even when poorly balanced with frames. I generally let the bees clean it out but I do take the basket out each winter for a good cleaning and lubricating the bottom where it spins. It's been a work horse for me and I highly, highly recommend the company and their products.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    224

    Default

    +1 on not jumping into the extractor right away. Make sure you are sticking with the sticky hobby, borrow the club extractor, then get a powered unit the size or a bit bigger than you need. You should easily be able to sell enough honey to justify the cost of expensive equipment. So don't skimp. My extractor paid for itself many times over the first year after I bought it. Its harder to expand when you are crushing and straining but it gives you time to learn the ropes and see how you like the need over a few years. For a hobby that's just fine, thanks.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Also you can try more traditional cut comb. A pen knife costs much less than extractor. And good cut comb honey commands a better price than liquid honey.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Honey extractor choices

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    Just to add my $.02. I have a Maxant 3100H that I converted to a P this last season. It is exactly what I need at this point with 20 or so hives. The inexpensive extractors are for the wannabees and one to two hive guys. If you are at around 10 hives total, buy the good stuff now because the inexpensive ones will end up being money down the drain once you figure things out. If you get out of bees later, this is the one piece of equipment that will hold it's value over time.
    Knowing what you know now, would you have just purchased the P to begin with?

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,526

    Default Re: Honey extractor choices

    Without a doubt. Extracting isn't rhe easiest job in the first place and having to crank an extractor for 2 hours or so is beyond fatiguing, even with family members helping. With a small 2 frame hand crank extractor, you would be looking at about the same amount of time to do just two or three supers, even if it is easier to turn.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Ozark, AL
    Posts
    823

    Default Re: Honey extractor choices

    Quote Originally Posted by thechristalfamily View Post
    I am new to the hobby as of this spring. Like many of you here I have a love for bees and keeping them. I started with two hives and made splits to make 4 going into winter. I will most likely stay between 4-8 hives in total and I just got my brother-in-law and father-in-law into the hobby. They will each only have 1-2 hives. I am looking to buy a community extractor and am ok with the buy once cry once philosophy. I am thinking of the Maxant 3100p with the 9 frame basket. Is this the best choice or would it be better for me to go with a cheaper Vivo extractor since I do not have that many hives? One more note. I plan on only keeping 3 supers per hive, this means that I will have to harvest honey at least twice a year. Thanks in advance for your help.
    Posted this over a year ago and have since used it another season. Very please with it. As a side note last year (June 2019) my friend and mentor, who has 80+ hives and a 40 frame extractor, well the motor on his extractor quit when we were about half done extracting his all his supers. We had to complete that weekend as he was going in for a knee replacement the next Tuesday. Of course took much longer but we got all the rest of his supers extracted using my extractor.

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/VIVO-New-...004E/155944869


    I ordered the Vivo extractor on Tuesday, May 30th via the Wal-Mart website, did that so I could add on their extended warranty, and received the extractor Friday, June 2nd. So customer service regarding shipping was outstanding. The extractor was double boxed, heavily packed and was in perfect condition – but that is how a new product should arrive so no extra points there. All accessories; legs, lids, instruction, screws, nuts and bolts were included, packaged and ready to use.

    Completed installation of legs and cover was made in about 30 minutes and the only tools needed were a Phillips screwdriver and a 5/8” wrench. Plugged the extractor in and it worked as it should, the motor is quite, smooth, and ran well at all speeds. Cleaned the machine and had 4 frames ready to try in the extractor which spun flawless. The barrel or drum is heavy, smooth, and should last for years.

    The one Con I found was trying to attach the honey gate. I have small arms and was able to reach wayyyyyyy down with the “nut” while my Dad screwed in the gate. Not sure someone could hold the nut in place and reach down to screw in the gate at the same time. Also if your arms were very large you would have to remove the frame, motor, and cage in order to attach the honey gate to the drum. Other Pros and upgrades with the extractor are that the legs are longer and have been beefed-up and will allow a five gallon bucket to be placed under the honey gate. Also there have now been braces added to the inside of the drum so that the frames will not fall or slide once placed in the cage.

    Since posting this I used the extractor last year to extract the honey from our 10 hives. Doing 8 frames at a time and just turn it on. By the time I uncap another 8 frames it is ready to reload and spin again. Very pleased with it. Sure it is not one of the "best" extractors but fits my needs.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    kincaid,il.
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Honey extractor choices

    Just to let you know, I started with a 2 frame basket hand crank. I sold it, and got a belt drive, 12 frame Dadant. It took two days to extract last year, so now I have a 20 frame Dadant. So think about how many hives you will have in the future. It is a good investment. My honey sales paid for them, and by the way, the 12 framer is for sale on craigslist.

  12. #31
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Cedar Lake, Indiana, USA
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Honey extractor choices

    Is the Vivo extractor you are referring to a radial or axial type?

  13. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Ozark, AL
    Posts
    823

    Default Re: Honey extractor choices

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike B1 View Post
    Is the Vivo extractor you are referring to a radial or axial type?
    It is radial. Just have to spin the frames once and done. Sure it is not a Dadant or Mann Lake but it works great and cost so much less. Likely you do get what you pay for but this Vivo has been a real "work horse". Having 10 hives figured it would do all I needed for years. Then last year when the motor went out on Pate's 40 frame Dadant with 34 10 frame supers to go we ran it almost nonstop for two days - about 12 hours each day with no problems. Might have used up a lot of it's life but would do it again if I needed to.
    Last edited by Groundhwg; 01-29-2020 at 12:46 PM.

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    224

    Default

    I would caution against buying an extractor because of price. Do the research: find the best one that fits your future needs, is easiest to use, makes you happiest. You don't need an extractor the first few years so you have plenty of time to research and find the best (sale) price for that model. Packages in the north are going for $150. Hobbiests spend lots in their first year. Learn how to keep bees alive, learn how to never buy bees again, learn how much honey a colony in your location under your management can produce, decide how many colonies you want. Now buy an extractor if you still want one; and no need to skimp. By now, of cost is an issue, you could have sold a few pounds honey or bees each year to go into the extractor fund. Cut comb is great honey. Crush and strain works for a few hives and a few # of honey each year. (and there are often combs that are not perfect, so put them in honey supers and crush them later. You don't have to crush good comb). Neighbors and clubs have extractors as you grow. Then buy the perfect extractor for you. A side benefit of using neighbor's and club's extractors is you get to try out pros and cons of several models and find what you like best.
    A final note, many people start bekeeping again each year because their bees don't survive. Such people often lose interest after losing money. Such people do not need an extractor.
    Good luck! Happy winter dreams and happy beekeeping!

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