Fed water droplets/ landing board- they went nuts - Page 4
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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Sisters, Oregon
    Posts
    275

    Default Re: Fed water droplets/ landing board- they went nuts

    Quote Originally Posted by clong View Post
    I would love to see that research! Perhaps someone on Beesource would like to take it on?



    I totally agree. Water in the hive is a resource. Dennis Murrell noted this many years ago. He lived in Wyoming at the time. He contended that keeping a frame feeder of water in the hive had the same effect as feeding sugar water did. One of my goals this winter was test this theory. I put a frame feeder full of water in a hive two weeks ago. I haven't checked it since, but I should. Dennis said his went down 4 inches in one day.

    Could lack of accessible moisture explain the demise of some marginal colonies during the winter?

    Blog post on condensation by Dennis Murrell:
    http://web.archive.org/web/201203081.../condensation/
    Nice post. I wonder the same thing. How much over wintering death is from dehydration?

    I’m keen to watch December weather. The stretches when its in the 30’s and dry when the cluster cannot move far. The day or few days during that month when they can forage for water may be make or break in importance.
    I'm smart but at the end of the day I'm still the help.

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  3. #62
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    482

    Default Re: Fed water droplets/ landing board- they went nuts

    I lost five of six packages in my first two years. I re-queened one as a last gasp effort in the second year. The colony survived and produced a lot of brood which I turned into nucs, then into foraging hives with purchased mated queens. I stopped listening to dogma, read, went with my knowledge base and experimented. I now have 9 colonies going into my fifth winter and a lot more confidence in what I do. It is fun learning new things, seeing "life" through a different lens.

    FYI: A single warm, moist day comparison of three different cluster size colonies recorded from simple sensors. "A" data is the outside ambient conditions, 1,2,3 are inside my "standard" hive configuration, above a canvass inner cover with a 1.5 inch spacer. The "DP", Dew Point, is calculated. Note the internal temperature is consistently above the internal dew point. It has been very humid with rain and snow:

    A. 43.0F @ 87% DP= 40F
    1. 69.1F @ 87% DP= 65F
    2. 71.8F @ 96% DP= 70F
    3. 68.5F @ 85% DP= 66F

    Best of luck to all this coming season.

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Geauga, Ohio
    Posts
    475

    Default Re: Fed water droplets/ landing board- they went nuts

    Here is an article from Randy Oliver that describes itself as being about Nosema, but clearly makes the case that the symptom we link to Nosema, dysentery, is due to _excess_ water in the bees' bodies.
    http://scientificbeekeeping.com/the-...y-bees-part-2/

    He really makes the case that since bees actually generate water from "burning" honey, but get very thirsty at high temps, that water flow through the cluster is really important.

    This is probably where a small cluster is really at risk, as some of you guys have been guessing. If the bees can't get to warm enough water and then get that to the bees who need it, that could ultimately pick off too many bees.

    Neat thread, I love seen peoples' own stories and data! Like a case study. Keep it coming! I really need a set of sensors... btw could y'all share what _sensors_ you use? I have an Arduino, this will get my butt in gear to deploy it...

  5. #64
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    482

    Default Re: Fed water droplets/ landing board- they went nuts

    Trishbookworm - "btw could y'all share what _sensors_ you use?" I try to keep it simple. I use dial thermometers, $4.00 each, some kitchen digital display thermometers $7.00, a hand held thermocouple reader and several thermocouples (freebies) which I use occasionally to probe spots. My biggest data supplying tools are a fish scale for weighting and outdoor weather stations. This item, La Crosse Technology 308-1412-3TX-Int Wireless Weather Station (Including 3 remote Sensors for $38.58) Sensors (TX141TH-BCH) are located above a canvass

    inner cover and provide "relative" values for temperature and relative humidity. There is now a weather station with 8 remote sensors available. Measuring humidity is not easy nor highly accurate without spending a lot of money. If you are buying an electronic / strain gauge weighting rig make sure it is temperature compensated. One thing is for sure, the thermometers clearly offer a simple means of verifying a cluster or live bees are in a hive, plus a lot more when coupled with other information. I love checking on three hives each morning with coffee and slippers on. I record with pencil and paper.

  6. #65
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Croatia
    Posts
    125

    Default Re: Fed water droplets/ landing board- they went nuts

    Quote Originally Posted by trishbookworm View Post
    btw could y'all share what _sensors_ you use? I have an Arduino,
    I will try to make inexpensive weight scale for beehive. The idea is to use (two) 20 kg load cells with 1:4 ratio.
    A picture:
    vaga.jpg

    So far the weight calibration; OK, but temperature compensation is difficult.

    Graph:
    https://thingspeak.com/channels/970348

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