Cherry Blossom Honey
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  1. #1
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    Aug 2016
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    Columbus, Ohio
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    Default Cherry Blossom Honey

    How many cherry trees would it take to get cherry blossom honey? 4, 5, a 1/4 an acre? several acres? Just trying to determine if it is worth pursuing.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Powhatan, Virginia, USA
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    To be varietal it is supposed to be at least 51%, that would take at least a couple acres and good timing.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    My personal experience with cherries, I have three trees, is that they bloom very early in the season and then for only for about two weeks. Could be the variety though. I have the Richmond sour cherries which are rather small and tart but make an excellent jam.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  5. #4
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    Jul 2017
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    St. Charles, MO, USA
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    113

    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    It depends on what else is growing and blooming around you. You would probably need at least several acres of them to even taste a difference in the honey and many acres to get mostly cherry blossom honey. I have an orchard with just about everything growing. I have both sweet and sour cherries. Some years, the honey bees will work the sweet cherries like crazy. Other years, they will not touch them because something better is blooming at the same time and other insects fertilize them for me. They usually work the sour cherries pretty well.

  6. #5
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    Aug 2016
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    Columbus, Ohio
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    Quote Originally Posted by John Davis View Post
    To be varietal it is supposed to be at least 51%, that would take at least a couple acres and good timing.
    In that case, it will be quite some time before I can have anything close to cherry blossom honey. Thanks for all the quick replies..

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
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    Northern Lower Michigan, USA
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    758

    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    Hi Frank
    I quess I am wondering "WHY" do you want cherry blossom honey? I know with the food I eat I like variety. You curious what it tastes like or is there a medicinal reasons. The Varietals with several flavors has a wider range of flavors present. I concur in early spring one would need to add supers the day prior to the blossoms and remove the day after. Cherry bloom is short as well.
    good luck, let us know if you find a way. In Michigan there are a large number of cherry trees in the Traverse City area, one could either inquire about or offer your hives there.
    GG

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    John Day River, OR
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    279

    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    My experience pollinating cherries is they dont really make honey off of them. But a lot of this probably has to do with management/timing. For us its an April bloom, the bees are mostly focused on growth and we are mostly focused on swarm control. Also the weather that time of year can be pretty poor. On top of all that, we are packed in there at pretty high densities for pollination.

    But I have a jar of cherry honey from France, so maybe places where the bloom timing cooperates with the weather, I suppose it could be possible.

    I DID taste a little honey last summer that I am 95% sure was robbed from rotting cherries (20-30 acres). That was an intense flavor, and intense color.

  9. #8
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    Aug 2016
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
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    49

    Default

    I currently have about 8 trees near the hives. My son is wanting to plant more of them so was curious just how many it would take to have something that I don’t see other local providers offering. Looking for an edge in my future sales.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gray Goose View Post
    Hi Frank
    I quess I am wondering "WHY" do you want cherry blossom honey? I know with the food I eat I like variety. You curious what it tastes like or is there a medicinal reasons. The Varietals with several flavors has a wider range of flavors present. I concur in early spring one would need to add supers the day prior to the blossoms and remove the day after. Cherry bloom is short as well.
    good luck, let us know if you find a way. In Michigan there are a large number of cherry trees in the Traverse City area, one could either inquire about or offer your hives there.
    GG

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Sacramento, CA, USA
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    5,486

    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    You would need acres of trees... I don't know if they even produce much nectar either to make it worth while.

  11. #10
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    Dec 2008
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    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    In S.E. Wisconsin there are numerous, scattered, but not dense, Wild Cherry trees in the woods. About ten years ago we had good overwintering with strong hives. It was the only time in about 50 years that a surplus was made. So rare that it took a long time to figure out what the flavor was.

    Crazy Roland

  12. #11
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    Dec 2010
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    Ojai, California
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    Frank - on the eve of cherry bloom, cover all the nearby sources you can cover, pull the honey from a few hives for a day or two (noting which frames go in which boxes), replace them with empty combs, and weigh the hives. That's your tare weight. Watch the returning bees for pollen. If nearly all are pollen laden, it likely is not a honey crop. Weigh the hives a day or two later, subtract the tare weight from the 2nd day weight. Peek at the honey frames - if there is nothing, return the hives to normal status. If, however, you see some nectar stored, keep at least one hive locked on to cherry blossom honey for a week. Let it cure for 2 to 3 more weeks after capping. Pull it and taste test the cured, capped honey.

    I'd like to hear the results

  13. #12
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    Dec 2008
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    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    We did nothing out of the ordinary, extracted when the super was capped, and got about a barrel. It did have a slightly red tint.

    Crazy Roland

  14. #13
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    May 2012
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    Sacramento, CA, USA
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    The only other thing about cherries, I do not think they're very attractive to bees, if anything else is blooming they will work that instead.

  15. #14
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    Dec 2008
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    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    JRG13 - are your Cherries wild or cultivated? All of our experience is with wild Cherry trees, Prunus serotina????

    Crazy Roland

  16. #15
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    May 2012
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    Sacramento, CA, USA
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    Cultivated. I used to have about 32 at the house, even with a hive or 2 there, couldn't get a **** bee to visit a flower during bloom....

  17. #16
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    Dec 2008
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    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    I suspect that is the reason for the difference, ours are wild.

    Crazy Roland

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
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    Columbus, Ohio
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    Mine are Montmorency, not wild.

  19. #18
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    Dec 2010
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    Ojai, California
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    You might try spraying a bee attractant onto the flowers during the bloom, as I've seen done with pears.

  20. #19
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    Mar 2015
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    Niagara Co., NY, USA
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    139

    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    Quote Originally Posted by kilocharlie View Post
    You might try spraying a bee attractant onto the flowers during the bloom, as I've seen done with pears.
    What would be your first choice?

  21. #20
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    Dec 2010
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    Ojai, California
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    Default Re: Cherry Blossom Honey

    I've really only seen 35% sugar water + perfume used. They sprayed it onto the blossoms with a sprayer mounted on a pole. The farmer said that his pears were less than 15% sugar and that bees were just not interested in them without it.

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