Introducing a laying queen
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  1. #1
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    Default Introducing a laying queen

    I saw a video in which the bee keeper said workers will not harm a laying queen released into a queen less hive or a hive that already had a laying queen.
    Is this true?
    If this is true would adding a frame of brood with a laying queen on it be a good way to re-queen a hive?

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    I would never try to introduce a caged (shipped) queen to a queenless colony without doing a slow release. But a queen that is still laying, I can pick up the frame with the queen and her bees and add it to a queenless hive and that works almost all the time. But that queen is laying and is with her bees. She doesn't panic and run around because she is with her bees and her pheromones advertise her fertility.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    This is great, I was planning on starting some nucs (in the spring) but I was stuck on how to get the queens from a nuc to a full size hive. I can't see me catching a queen, I am lucky if I even see one.

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    You can let the nuc grow up into a hive or you can add frames to them. If you want to make sure no queen was on the frames you can shake bees off of frames and put them back on the hive above an excluder and wait for bees to occupy those combs again.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    Brother Adam did this regularly, as does a queen breeder I know in the UK. New queen is removed from the mating nuc, caged, and taken to the colony to be requeened. Tho old queen is removed from colony, and caged. New queen is run into the colony...I think with some smoke. The old queen is taken back to the mating nuc and run in. She’s left there until cells are available. Bro Adam also says take extra precautions if the new queen is one you really care about...like a breeder queen. So never say never.

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Brother Adam did this regularly, as does a queen breeder I know in the UK. New queen is removed from the mating nuc, caged, and taken to the colony to be requeened. Tho old queen is removed from colony, and caged. New queen is run into the colony...I think with some smoke. The old queen is taken back to the mating nuc and run in. She’s left there until cells are available. Bro Adam also says take extra precautions if the new queen is one you really care about...like a breeder queen. So never say never.
    I do it this way regularly. The key is, it's a laying queen and not one that's been in a cage for hours and/or days. A queen that's been in a cage for any length of time is no longer laying, and she gets the slow candy release.

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    Quote Originally Posted by grozzie2 View Post
    A queen that's been in a cage for any length of time is no longer laying, and she gets the slow candy release.
    Orin my case, push-in cage

  9. #8
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    This threat brings back memories of a thread several years ago.
    The question was, "What is the Commercial way to introduce queens"?
    Every time I think of that question, I have to chuckle.
    Bees are bees. They do what they do irrespective of us.
    We do best when we understand that we are in their world when working hives.
    Anyway, he got all kinds of answers!
    One poster claimed that he just peals back the screen on the cage and tosses her in!
    I prefer to choose the safest methods known. I'm in no hurry and don't want to take chances.
    So, what is the "commercial" method for queen introduction?
    My answer is, "The method with the highest percentage of acceptance and lowest failure rate."
    I have exactly ONE more hive than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond dispute!

  10. #9
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    Quote Originally Posted by HarryVanderpool View Post
    My answer is, "The method with the highest percentage of acceptance and lowest failure rate."
    Cockamamie monkey motions.
    David Matlock

  11. #10
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverderwent View Post
    Cockamamie monkey motions.
    That which we seek to avoid.
    I have exactly ONE more hive than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond dispute!

  12. #11
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    Quote Originally Posted by HarryVanderpool View Post
    That which we seek to avoid.
    David Matlock

  13. #12
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Bro Adam also says take extra precautions if the new queen is one you really care about...like a breeder queen. So never say never.
    I'd wholeheartedly agree with that - particularly if the new queen should be of a different breed from that of the recipient colony.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  14. #13
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    Introducing a laying queen does work...they will not harm her....but on a few occasions I noted they let her lay for awhile and then created supercedure cells....they did this when I combined the hives rather than just gave them the queen. In my instances, I had two-frame mating nucs towards the end of the season and combined them with queenless colonies. I have not witnessed the supercedure when only introducing a queen.
    Help is here to never misplace that hive tool again: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvwlSiOzgOU

  15. #14

    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    You can let the nuc grow up into a hive or you can add frames to them. If you want to make sure no queen was on the frames you can shake bees off of frames and put them back on the hive above an excluder and wait for bees to occupy those combs again.
    Such a great tips from you on that forum, appreciate them so much. Can't stop reading what people have to say about all of the stuff as i'm starting my journey in this area! Won't it harm them if they have to move again and again though?

  16. #15
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    Default Re: Introducing a laying queen

    The book "Beekeeping at Buckfast Abbey" described the method used to requeen the field colonies. Laying queens raised the previous summer were removed from the nuc boxes and caged in wire mesh cages with a candy plug sufficient to delay release for "a few hours." The caged queens were placed between the top bars in the center of the brood nest of the colonies to be requeened.

    The old queen in the field colony was caught, caged in the same manner, and used to requeen the now queenless nucs until new grafts were placed in them.
    42 + years - 24 colonies - IPM disciple - Naturally Skeptic

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