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Thread: OAV overdose?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
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    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
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    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    No matter the path taken, there is always a "concern". The interesting fact to explore is why bees bring in so many different chemicals. Is the world is changing too fast for the bees to discriminate good from bad?

    Winter treatments after the Solstice, "winter" meaning near-broodless or brood-less hive conditions, apparently eliminates the need to treat until the next Fall Varroa Bombs are dropped on me. The short half life of oxalic acid treatments and it's effects on Varroa has generated the healthiest hives I have seen in 5 seasons (along with getting smarter?).

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  3. #22

    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    https://www.facebook.com/mehilaistal...05315170/?t=26

    Professional beekeeper in Finland wintering carnica bees and making varroa treatments. All treatments once.

    Notice the removal of the plate from hive bottom, to fully open the wire screen bottom.
    Last edited by Juhani Lunden; 11-26-2019 at 10:45 PM.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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    1,464

    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    What is the purpose of the ?foil perimeter sleeve?

    Is the entrance being reduced to keep out mice?

    What is climate like where screen bottoms are being used for venting? What is average daily high temps? What are extreme temps? How much average snow fall? How much wind and is wind even a factor under hive as snow and leaned insert block winds?

    Thanks. I ask for my own curiosity( I have two deep styrofoam supers, cover and bottom board and top cover) and for an acquaintance who purchased and is using the Styrofoam hive and is pondering how much to vent the bottom.
    Zone 3b. If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got!

  5. #24

    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    Quote Originally Posted by mgolden View Post
    What is the purpose of the ?foil perimeter sleeve?

    Is the entrance being reduced to keep out mice?

    What is climate like where screen bottoms are being used for venting? What is average daily high temps? What are extreme temps? How much average snow fall? How much wind and is wind even a factor under hive as snow and leaned insert block winds?

    Thanks. I ask for my own curiosity( I have two deep styrofoam supers, cover and bottom board and top cover) and for an acquaintance who purchased and is using the Styrofoam hive and is pondering how much to vent the bottom.
    Sleeve is for protecting against woodpeckers.
    The mice guards are mounted by the guy back to camera (white rim he is pushing with his hivetool)
    Climate is 4-6 months no flying winter, cleansing flights from late February to early April. End of honey crop early August, max +35C summer, min -40C in winter.
    Snow fall anything between 0 and 100 cm.
    Wind does not affect, and if so positively, to ensure air circulation.

    These fellows have +1200 hives.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
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    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    The oxalic treatments that are becoming popular here in New Zealand using cardboard strips put 18 grams of OA into the hive per box.

    If overdosed the first sign you will see is spotty brood. If brood is still normal you are OK.
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

  7. #26
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Vauxhall, Alberta, Canada
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    342

    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    @Oldtimer - any more details on 'how to'?
    Summ Summ Bienchen summ herum

  8. #27
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    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
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    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    Here is a quick guide someone wrote. The term "gib tape" is a local building product, it's just a cardboard tape that is use for patching joints in interior wallboard prior to plastering them, any similar cardboard could do. He folds the tape into 3.

    4 of these are hung in a brood box.

    It is very effective at killing varroa. Just, it can also damage the bees, if using for the first time monitor the hives closely through the treatment period.

    Otto's Staples.pdf
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

  9. #28
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    Vauxhall, Alberta, Canada
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    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    @oldtimer, thanks, very interesting. BTW, we call "gib tape" dry wall tape.

    You might be killing my OA Vap sales, but what ever helps the bee keepers!

    Best wishes to NZ, Joerg
    Last edited by Biermann; 11-28-2019 at 12:38 PM. Reason: Added something
    Summ Summ Bienchen summ herum

  10. #29
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    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
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    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    Maybe you could diversify into selling OA strips as well as vaporisers also. They quickly became very popular here but a lot of people don't want to mess with making them, instead buying them in buckets from a beekeeper who makes them and ships all over the country. It could be a big market.
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

  11. #30
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    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
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    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    I have purchased a stock of heavy solid coardboard stock .070" thick to cut strips from. This is supposedly identical to the material of the patented Argentinian strips "Uen Cap"

    I played a bit this past summer with common corrugated cardboard with the OA/Gly liquid. Common cardboard comes apart making the strips too hard to handle. Effectiveness? I had too few mites to really tell. My son will do a better experiment next summer. He is not short of mites in his area!

    I am following along on the forum Oldtimer mentions and there seems to be a bit of caution there about having strips in over winter as they absorb hive moisture and can get drippy.

    OA vapor works so well under those conditions though, that there really is no reason to use the strips then.

    The Argentinian strips are patented and approved in that country, but using them in the US puts you into uncharted legal territory. Randy Oliver is doing some sanctioned research in that area but hard to say how long it will take to get through the approval process.
    Frank

  12. #31
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    Feb 2015
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    Wayne, WV, USA
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    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    In the USA I have been unable to find out why OA has such a bad reputation as compared to formic acid in MAQS other than it has no real corporate sponsor.
    My guess is that the major cost for OAV is the vaporizer and respirator, which are a one-time purchase until one of them breaks, and OA is only a little more expensive than dirt, whereas formulations like MAQS, Apivar, etc. are definitely repeat purchases.

    I also used some strips according to the Argentinian formulation a few years ago, but I found them too messy to work with in my situation. Colonies were very clean though!
    Last edited by JoshuaW; 11-28-2019 at 07:09 PM.
    "The amazing thing about the honey bee is not that she works, but that she works for others." St. John Chrysostom

  13. #32
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    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    Yes that's one thing i didn't like when i used them the first time this season, had to wear nitrile gloves, and everything you touch including smoker and hive tool are sticky with OA / glycerine mix.

    Not quite the pleasant beekeeping experience I normally enjoy.
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
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    Brieselang, Brandenburg, Germany
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    Default

    In Germany many people started using Varromed, basically OA. It is registered, works like normal dribbling and can be used always.
    I'm wondering why it's also allowed while the harvest time.
    So that's maybe a hint that OA concentration in honey can't be too high.
    For bees it's overdosing exactly like OA dribbling with sugar.

  15. #34

    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    Quote Originally Posted by psycain89-Germany View Post
    In Germany many people started using Varromed, basically OA.
    I'm wondering why it's also allowed while the harvest time.
    .
    https://www.donegalbees.ie/?attachment_id=7586

    This one?

    It says on the label: Not to be used during nectar flow.

  16. #35
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    Nov 2019
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    Brieselang, Brandenburg, Germany
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    Default

    Oh okay. Thats kind of different.
    If we use Oxuvar(pure OA 3,5%) after the 31.12. we are not allowed to harvest any honey next year. But with varromed you can treat almost always except the harvest windows.

  17. #36
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    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
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    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    Hi Biermann, Feeding my grandkids my honey is not a science experiment ( my daughter would disown me) but it is a vote of confidence. I agree with the "lowest risk" comment for OA treatments. I will not use any manufactured miticide like Apivar as a principle requirement on my little farm. We are fortunate to have effective organic acids as a miticide.

    I insulate my hives, sample-measure top temperatures and see no reason not to OAV when the bees are clustering up. Winter OAV, around Dec 25 to Jan 1 works here - cleans house. I intend to do it twice this eyar , 14 days apart. It was a long and bad Fall Varroa migration year. I do not believe in alcohol wash techniques.

  18. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
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    160

    Default Re: OAV overdose?

    Hi Biermann, Feeding my grandkids my honey is not a science experiment ( my daughter would disown me) but it is a vote of confidence. I agree with the "lowest risk" comment for OA treatments. I will not use any manufactured miticide like Apivar as a principle requirement on my little farm. We are fortunate to have effective organic acids as a miticide.

    I insulate my hives, sample-measure top temperatures and see no reason not to OAV when the bees are clustering up. Winter OAV, around Dec 25 to Jan 1 works here - cleans house. I intend to do it twice this year , 14 days apart. It was a long and bad Fall Varroa migration year. I do not believe in alcohol wash techniques.

    Hum, hum, hum! Bees, sing around!

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