Planning for my first bee's come spring - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    589

    Default Re: Planning for my first bee's come spring

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleJoe View Post
    Thank you for your reply. I have scouted my property pretty thoroughly. The area I've chosen will get good sun in early spring and through winter, just not in summer thru fall. I'm also planning a northern wind break through the winter. Thanks again.
    That sounds like a good location. Mine are not in a great location for sun, but I chose the location to avoid annoying my neighbors.

    Some other random thoughts:
    * if you dye the syrup green before feeding you can easily tell where the syrup is at and where honey is at in your hive
    * I would pick 8 or 10 frame boxes. At some point you are going to need another box and you are only going to have the wrong size (8/10) available. I have a few nuc boxes and the rest of my equipment is 10 frame

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Sisters, Oregon
    Posts
    139

    Default Re: Planning for my first bee's come spring

    FYI-I used rapid feeders this year with my new colonies and will be using them again next year. The other commenter is correct that if they take all the syrup you can get escapees. So the solution is to check the levels often enough to keep them filled. If they are escaping under the cup I pour some water in to keep bees out and open it up the top to let the escapees out. Itís the most humane solution in my mind.

    There are other feeders that pile on the feed better- like the tank style or paint can, or ones that feed less like quart jar with a few holes if you are aiming to trickle feed. When you know your goal for feeding, you can then select the best size. Rapid feeders in my mind are great for middle of the road. My colonies built up really well with these. Iím going to experiment with baggies and paint cans for fall. Thats the pile on time. Feeding is an art. Also remember pollen. As essential as syrup. I use Ultrabee pollen patties. Feed feed feed first year colonies. Once they are established the following year they can tap their stores if necessary.

    The biggest risk you run with overfeeding is backfilling the brood nest in spring. So I aimed for having fully drawn comb in their brood boxes as my marker. Once thats done the bees can usually take it from there. I fed some during the dearth then fed super heavy in fall.
    I'm smart but at the end of the day I'm still the help.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Planning for my first bee's come spring

    Quote Originally Posted by elmer_fud View Post
    That sounds like a good location. Mine are not in a great location for sun, but I chose the location to avoid annoying my neighbors.

    Some other random thoughts:
    * if you dye the syrup green before feeding you can easily tell where the syrup is at and where honey is at in your hive
    * I would pick 8 or 10 frame boxes. At some point you are going to need another box and you are only going to have the wrong size (8/10) available. I have a few nuc boxes and the rest of my equipment is 10 frame
    The green dye is an interesting idea. I've settled on using 8 frame boxes after a lot of reading. I had already bought a 10 frame before that. I'll use that as a spare hive for the time being. I did pick up a super for it.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Planning for my first bee's come spring

    Quote Originally Posted by LAlldredge View Post
    FYI-I used rapid feeders this year with my new colonies and will be using them again next year. The other commenter is correct that if they take all the syrup you can get escapees. So the solution is to check the levels often enough to keep them filled. If they are escaping under the cup I pour some water in to keep bees out and open it up the top to let the escapees out. Itís the most humane solution in my mind.

    There are other feeders that pile on the feed better- like the tank style or paint can, or ones that feed less like quart jar with a few holes if you are aiming to trickle feed. When you know your goal for feeding, you can then select the best size. Rapid feeders in my mind are great for middle of the road. My colonies built up really well with these. Iím going to experiment with baggies and paint cans for fall. Thats the pile on time. Feeding is an art. Also remember pollen. As essential as syrup. I use Ultrabee pollen patties. Feed feed feed first year colonies. Once they are established the following year they can tap their stores if necessary.

    The biggest risk you run with overfeeding is backfilling the brood nest in spring. So I aimed for having fully drawn comb in their brood boxes as my marker. Once thats done the bees can usually take it from there. I fed some during the dearth then fed super heavy in fall.
    I got the rapid rounds so I can refill them without disturbing the hive. I'll check them daily in the beginning. I'm going to make my own shim's for them out of 1x4 cedar. They can also be used in winter as solid sugar feeders while removing the cup. I am considering a pollen trap so I can make my own patties going forward. About a week on a hive during the flow should give me plenty. Wish the traps weren't so expensive.

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