How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    he makes $8,000 a year, I was thinking it was $18 per 1000 views, it's $18 per 1000 ad views, so like $5 per 1000 views. Those Minecraft guys make millions.
    NCSBA Certified Beekeeper - my Youtube Vlog
    https://www.youtube.com/c/BackyardBeesNC

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  3. #62
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    But that isn't beekeeping - it's film-making.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  4. #63
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    Seriously, consider beekeeping a hobby for a few more years. You need a lot more experience before you can plan for making any money, and I mean income not profit. If you keep it a hobby you be happy with the experience you get vs the cost. If you think of it as a business you will invest as if you will one day (soon) turn a profit. That's a sure fire way to loose money then interest. Once you know what you are doing with bees and what to expect in your area you will know how much you can make. As a hobbyist, I make about $400 per overwintered colony. Income not profit. Some years better than others. As lj pointed out, were I to count labor I'd be in a sad state.... Hive maintenance is less than 10 hours per year (i don't actually know how long cuz it's a hobby) but extracting and marketing, not to mention jars and equipment all take their toll before I get mine 🙂

  5. #64
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Man I feel like that guy from the first of 100,000 hives thread
    NCSBA Certified Beekeeper - my Youtube Vlog
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  6. #65
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Quote Originally Posted by ifixoldhouses View Post
    Man I feel like that guy from the first of 100,000 hives thread
    About 30 years ago, I had dreams of getting rich growing Christmas trees on my 43 acre farmette in WI. Looked good on paper.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  7. #66
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    About 30 years ago, I had dreams of getting rich growing Christmas trees on my 43 acre farmette in WI. Looked good on paper.
    lol, **** artificial trees
    NCSBA Certified Beekeeper - my Youtube Vlog
    https://www.youtube.com/c/BackyardBeesNC

  8. #67
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Quote Originally Posted by ifixoldhouses View Post
    Man I feel like that guy from the first of 100,000 hives thread
    It's all good. Enjoy the hobby, do the parts that you enjoy, and see what happens. You might be surprised.

    As previously stated, I am hoping for a good honey crop next year. I didn't get a good one this year, and I got none last year, but I seriously think I will next year. Why? Because I am learnng what it takes, I still enjoy it, and i have lowered my expectations.

    A bit above someone said something along the lines of new keepers eventually start making nucs. Well, that is my plan next year, but I don't consider that a failure in any way. I'll enjoy making nucs and selling them, if that works out.

    Yeah, so do what you enjoy, and see if you can make a little money at it.

    BTW, I have made a few dollars selling hive equipment carefully purchased and assembled by me, with a little markup. I build them in the cold of winter, and sell them in the Spring. I have met beekeepers that post on here that way, and was able to mentor a new keeper a little through that. All is good, all part of the hobby.

    Re the new hives in the area, I wouldn't worry about a few new ones (other than the mites they might bring). Perhaps it is a good sign, that someone else thinks the area worthwhile for production.
    So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to everyone, and especially to those who are of the household of faith.

  9. #68
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Quote Originally Posted by ifixoldhouses View Post
    he makes $8,000 a year, I was thinking it was $18 per 1000 views, it's $18 per 1000 ad views, so like $5 per 1000 views. Those Minecraft guys make millions.
    Heck, my own kid now wants ME to buy HIM a "flamingo hoodie" for $44.95 because this is how he want to supports his favorite you-tuber (them you-tubers sell some cool hoodies, you know).

    Now go and set up your own "ifixoldhouses" channel.
    Maybe few bees will buy your T-Shirts.
    Those T-Shirts better be cool.
    Hehehe....

    On the other hand, I could provide some watch-worthy stuff, actually.
    OK, I will not spill my own beans.
    But that will make it a full-time job WITHOUT a guarantied paycheck.
    I will wait...
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  10. #69
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Quote Originally Posted by ifixoldhouses View Post
    If you have single deeps with excluder and 2-3 medium supers on top, could you expect 80-100 lbs per colony? I have 12 and am thinking I'll get 1200 lbs roughly. if sold at $13 a pound should bring $15,600 crazy? I might start at $15 a pound.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erU1BNPuu-k
    I hate to tell you this, but not all honey is created equal. Clover, Tupelo, Sage, and Mesquite honeys seem to get the top prices, then comes orange and the better tasting medium - dark honeys. Most of my Wildflower honey includes mustard and others less desirable (=dark and strong) flavors and get sold at bulk prices to the bakeries if they are too low on the quality scale to make mead. Buckwheat fights for less than 20% of the populations's tastebuds.

    You will very likely not even have to worry about any of this if you do not have a truck and do not move your bees to the various blooms. The money is in the pollination contracts, and developing a reputation for showing up with more bees than your SWAG estimates. Honey is extra pocket money, unless you make mead, which should be aged at least 3 years, preferably 6 years. Then you might get $27.50 USD per bottle if you've been at it a few years. I do tell the mead affectionadoes to please place their orders a year or two early, to be refunded in full if the crop is low or poor. Many just say, "Keep it for now and please put me at the top of next year's list."

    Getting back to honey production, try offering to take a commercial beekeeper out to breakfast and pick his brain. Then do it with another, and then a third commercial beekeeper. No two beekeepers are alike, and you'll probably learn more from them than you will in most books. You will learn how to make more honey, but then you will have to go try to do what you have learned, and get it dialed in just right for your locations and timing.

    There are methods that make LOTS of honey - 2 queen systems, larger hive boxes, pulling only a small amount of bees off a strong colony to make splits / nuc's and keeping the production potential idealized through the main blooms, excellent record keeping integrated with experience and knowing how rainfall amounts in each area and what months they came in affect honey production on each bloom, the new cell phone apps that tell you how close the bees are to swarming, etc. etc. etc.

  11. #70
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Most of our honey is Tulip poplar around here, I'm thinking of just keeping about 15 production hives at this point and lots of nucs.
    NCSBA Certified Beekeeper - my Youtube Vlog
    https://www.youtube.com/c/BackyardBeesNC

  12. #71
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    I really like the tulip poplar honey that my bees produce. So do my relatives in Florida who are accustomed to orange blossom honey. The problem is that the tulip poplar flow barely lasts a month, so we don't get as much as we'd like.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  13. #72
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    I stumbled across this a few days ago and thought of this thread ...

    Work Smarter, Not Harder

    In his 1835 book Practical Beekeeping, Russian beekeeper Nicolai Vitvitsky writes, “Peasant families commonly have 1,000 hives. Tending these takes little effort, so the owner can work his fields and attend to other matters.”

    Today, conventional beekeeping has become so complicated that running even a dozen hives calls for a lot of dedication, expertise, and expense; it’s hard to imagine managing 1,000 hives without a team of employees. The difference is that modern beekeepers — like their counterparts in other branches of agriculture — want to increase honey output beyond what the bees would naturally produce. Increasing production requires more input and management, and it’s hard on bees and beekeepers alike.
    So, the idea of less productive hives - but a lot more of them - might be worth considering.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  14. #73
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    I stumbled across this a few days ago and thought of this thread ...
    .............
    So, the idea of less productive hives - but a lot more of them - might be worth considering.
    LJ
    Just down my alley.
    Few days ago I posted few links to 6-frame based production hives.
    I spent the time over the holidays trying to nail their methods and I think I got them.

    To be fair, even in Russia-proper those 6-framer beeks are looked at as if some "freaks" (similar to the compact verticals).
    Meanwhile the "freaks" are doing great, ESPECIALLY in the small-crop/mono-crop/niche/early honeys.

    A common thing - while the "conventionals" spend the time and resources to grow their 10/12 framers for the main flow - the "freeks" are already harvesting the early honey and sell it for $$$ - because they can.

    Also turned out, some "freaks" have been running 6-framers for 20 years - just quietly and not on Youtube.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  15. #74
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Somehow, I cannot imagine peasant families in 1835 having any possibility of caring for 1,000 beehives. There were no cars so the hives had to be fairly close to home. It seems to me that having that many hives in close proximity to each other would starve each other out competing for food sources. It would be really bad if each of your neighbors also had the same number of hives. Apparently, there were a lot more flowers out there in those days....

  16. #75
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Quote Originally Posted by dudelt View Post
    Somehow, I cannot imagine peasant families in 1835 having any possibility of caring for 1,000 beehives. There were no cars so the hives had to be fairly close to home. It seems to me that having that many hives in close proximity to each other would starve each other out competing for food sources. It would be really bad if each of your neighbors also had the same number of hives. Apparently, there were a lot more flowers out there in those days....
    1) Imagine that most any one has several distributed yards.
    2) Imagine that the mega mono-crop fields, horizon to a horizon do not exist.
    3) Imagine that the pesticides are not invented yet.

    There is sufficient forage for everyone.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  17. #76
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Somehow, I cannot imagine peasant families in 1835 having any possibility of caring for 1,000 beehives. There were no cars so the hives had to be fairly close to home.
    Not so - Vitvitsky wrote that in 1835. Even 75 years later-on, people were still using horses and carts to transport hives (and people) around:



    (From Miller, '50 Years', 1911)
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  18. #77
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    Not so - Vitvitsky wrote that in 1835. Even 75 years later-on, people were still using horses and carts to transport hives (and people) around:



    (From Miller, '50 Years', 1911)
    LJ
    Transporting log hives by a horse was rather routine.
    Not a big deal.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  19. #78
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    So if your labor is virtually free (a hobby) and you reinvest all sales proceeds to buy whatever minimal equipment you cannot produce, and split each year to fill your equipment, you could grow to 1000 in a few years; length depends on how much time it takes to make a hive and what survival rates are (I could easily tripple or quadruple from overwintered colonies if I'm happy with less honey and don't sell many nucs. So if losses are 75% growth could be slow. But with 50% survival and quadrupling each year (effectively doubling because half are lost...) would be 10 - 1000 colonies in about 8 years.) Does this really work in the age of mites and migratory beekeeping? Probably to an extent but I think it's gonna be more work than in 1835. And there are gonna be a lot of mite bombs. And a lot of swarms. I wonder what the output would be? Sales of (overwintered?) Darwinian nucs, maybe some extra honey -- 10# / hive average? But 10,000# honey is going to be a lot of work so maybe it's less. Nowadays this seems to look better on paper....
    Michael Bush wrote some good posts on lazy beekeeping, for anyone heading this direction. Not for those living with ocd.... Ahh... winter, when we have time to think about these notions.... I find come spring I am running around trying to do my best for each hive despite trying to live like it's 1835.... 😉

  20. #79
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Quote Originally Posted by Amibusiness View Post
    .... But 10,000# honey is going to be a lot of work so maybe it's less......
    All we need to do - STOP producing so much of the cheap and mediocre honey.
    Lots of mediocre and cheap honey killing everything and anything.

    It should be like this:
    20191204_181252.jpg
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  21. #80
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    Default Re: How much honey could one expect from one hive? Spring

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    All we need to do - STOP producing so much of the cheap and mediocre honey.
    Lots of mediocre and cheap honey killing everything and anything.
    One of Britain's principal supermarket chains (Tesco) has just had to remove all of it's own brand 'Natural Honey' from the shelves, after Inspectors detected unacceptably high levels of sucrose in it.

    In all seriousness, if I had the necessary ability, resources and motivation, then I'd be producing either cut-comb or section honey - and charging top dollar for it.

    The world is flooded with extracted honey, which is wide open to adulteration, and as detection by NMR is so expensive, it can only be justified when suspicions are aroused within major operations - so I suspect that small-scale low-level adulteration may be more commonplace than appreciated.

    But - although 'honey in the comb' can never be a 100% guarantee of purity, it would hopefully provide some reassurance in this age of fake goods.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

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