Power For A Vaporizer - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    3,927

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Quote Originally Posted by gnor View Post
    I use a half face mask with organic vapor cartridges.
    I too wear an organic vapor half mask, but I suspect the thin little paticulate filters are doing most of the work.

    I also work upwind, but anyone who has sat around a campfire knows that the smoke will always find you.
    My apiary is arranged in a square. One row always has me downwind.
    Not sure why the big fuss, I don't like breathing in OA so I wear a mask. I spent too many years breathing in nearly lethal doses of chlorine and sulfur dioxide gases to play with it any more. Might keep me from enjoying a nice cigar.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Grand Rapids MI USA
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    1,522

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Not sure why the big fuss, I don't like breathing in OA so I wear a mask. I spent too many years breathing in nearly lethal doses of chlorine and sulfur dioxide gases to play with it any more. Might keep me from enjoying a nice cigar.
    Ya, I used to pull and move machinery, my lungs have probably been subjected to every carcinogen known to man blowing crap apart with a torch. The mask is darn well worth the price and inconvenience.
    Last edited by JWPalmer; 10-27-2019 at 02:56 PM.
    Rod

  4. #23
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Gainesville, Georgia
    Posts
    40

    Default

    I installed a small inverter in my truck. Just plug the drop cord in when vaporizing.

  5. #24

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Quote Originally Posted by gnor View Post
    A battery charger would work, but you will need at least 12-15 amps to run a vaporizer that takes 150 Watts. A charger will also put out a bit more voltage than a battery, so it would make sense to do a dry run to get the timing down.

    I use a Harbor Freight Battery charger set to jump start mode. It runs a vaporizer just fine. It vaporizes at the same speed as a lawn mower battery.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Southeastern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    I love the one I bought this summer - very light and easy to connect to varrox:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
    Posts
    6

    Default

    A battery charger will work just fine as long as it can continuously output 12 volts at 15 amps.

  8. #27

    Default

    I use a viking jump starter. It's really lightweight and good for 4 or 5 treatments before it needs to charge again. You do have to stick close because it only powers the wand for one minute at a time, but this is the. best that I found (aside from a car battery)
    https://www.harborfreight.com/Lithiu...ack-62749.html

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    East Brunswick, NJ , USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Dear beekeepers,

    I have been using Varrox OAV for a few previous seasons powered by my car battery. Now I have access to an electrical outlet and am looking for a good 12V/12A transformer according to the Varrox manual. Does anybody have a successful experience with a transformer that is available in DYI retail or online? Here is one on Amazon (12V x 12.5A = 150W): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...9PV6CGMT&psc=1 , but I am not sure about it and it was almost two generations since I have been playing with electrical devices in a physics lab.

    Thank you,
    BeeReal.
    Last edited by beereal; 11-01-2019 at 12:57 PM. Reason: format

  10. #29

    Smile Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    @ Mgolden Hi, Why buy from the US for $550. Your Manitoba neighbor sells for $150 on EBay.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Spring, Texas
    Posts
    271

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Neither of my Battery chargers will run the 12 volt unit that I use.

    I ended up using my old lawn mower battery for two hives.

    I have a small Honda generator but when I fired it up it died and it was not till this week that I had time to pull the carb and clean and blow it out. I will try it next time now that it runs.

  12. #31
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Lake County, Illinois
    Posts
    146

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    You need a respirator and a very good one. There is a great deal of hype abut vaporizing to save the bees but very little about the adverse impacts to your health. Unfortunately many bee keepers do not properly protect themselves. This is a very serious issue and you have asked the most valuable question I have seen on this forum. I just had lung surgery and take my word you do not want to go through this. Chemicals that may be saving bees can be harmful to you so protect yourself.
    Quote Originally Posted by Andhors View Post
    What is the opinion of the crowd about the need for a mask? I vape down wind. If I smell it I move away.

  13. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Schoharie, NY
    Posts
    136

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Quote Originally Posted by Plannerwgp View Post
    You need a respirator and a very good one. There is a great deal of hype abut vaporizing to save the bees but very little about the adverse impacts to your health. Unfortunately many bee keepers do not properly protect themselves. This is a very serious issue and you have asked the most valuable question I have seen on this forum. I just had lung surgery and take my word you do not want to go through this. Chemicals that may be saving bees can be harmful to you so protect yourself.
    I'm curious if you have any evidence of adverse health impacts? IMO its an acid vapor that is found within our own bodies and in the things we eat, which to the beekeeper has been heavily diluted with the outside air before even a whiff of it is detected. Even in concentrated doses its unable to kill individual honeybees, so how bad can it be getting a diluted breeze of it wafting past you once in awhile? Are you just saying this because of the unrelated lung surgery or do you actually have evidence that its dangerous? I want to hear more opinions

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Schoharie, NY
    Posts
    136

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    I agree with you - but the problem with exercising such a point of view is that 'the crowd' (or at least a vociferous element within 'the crowd') consider this to be a serious 'no-no' - bit like using OA sold as wood bleach. There will always be a totally inflexible difference of opinion - so is there really any point discussing such things ?
    LJ
    I agree with your sentiment but just a warning; I DID buy OA from amazon instead of the beekeeping variant and even though the purity was the same and the amazon reviews said it worked with beehives, I killed all 5 hives that I used it on. And this was the same day after using beekeeping OA on about 10 other hives; which I ran out of before switching to the cheaper stuff. All 10 hives lived and all 5 hives died. Sad day for me, now I don't mess around!

  15. #34
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Gainesville, Georgia
    Posts
    40

    Default

    In the hot summer months the OA vapor will also cling to your skin, because of the sweat. By the time I’m finished my arms and neck are burning. I rinse of with water when I’m finished.

  16. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    602

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    According to US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the level of OA vapor “Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health” is 500 mg/cubic meter (https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/idlh/144627.html). This number is based on acute oral toxicity data in humans obtained in 1930’s (obviously they cannot experiment vapor toxicity on humans).

    The short-term exposure limit to OA, set by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, is 2 mg/cubic meter. Some of us can easily get exposed to this concentration, considering we typically use 2g (2000 mg) per one double-deep hive. This means, if you employ somebody to do OAV, you must have that person wear appropriate protective gears.

    Whatever the reason, bees seem to be tougher than humans when it comes to OA vapor.

  17. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Ozark, AL
    Posts
    819

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Quote Originally Posted by AG Fresh View Post
    I agree with your sentiment but just a warning; I DID buy OA from amazon instead of the beekeeping variant and even though the purity was the same and the amazon reviews said it worked with beehives, I killed all 5 hives that I used it on. And this was the same day after using beekeeping OA on about 10 other hives; which I ran out of before switching to the cheaper stuff. All 10 hives lived and all 5 hives died. Sad day for me, now I don't mess around!
    Why did the hives die? Did your queens in all 5 hives die, how long after using the "wood bleach" or product from Amazon till you knew the hives have died?

  18. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    1,566

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Quote Originally Posted by Kuro View Post
    According to US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the level of OA vapor “Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health” is 500 mg/cubic meter (https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/idlh/144627.html). This number is based on acute oral toxicity data in humans obtained in 1930’s (obviously they cannot experiment vapor toxicity on humans).

    The short-term exposure limit to OA, set by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, is 2 mg/cubic meter. Some of us can easily get exposed to this concentration, considering we typically use 2g (2000 mg) per one double-deep hive. This means, if you employ somebody to do OAV, you must have that person wear appropriate protective gears.

    Whatever the reason, bees seem to be tougher than humans when it comes to OA vapor.
    Which should tell you that this advice is directed at people who are exposed to Oxalic Acid INDOORS.
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  19. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
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    602

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    Which should tell you that this advice is directed at people who are exposed to Oxalic Acid INDOORS.
    LJ
    I do not think we would get exposed to 500mg/cubic meter outdoors, but 2 mg/cubic meter is realistic, considering distribution of OA fume is uneven.

    The main point I wanted to make is, the risk is real to the extent that it is likely to be illegal (in the US) to have your employees do OAV without protective gears.

    When you are doing OAV yourself, you can make your own decision based on your situation. I OAVed one Nuc in summer when I made a split, and I did not wear a mask. But I would wear one if I’m vaping a dozen hives in a row.

  20. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    North Andover, MA
    Posts
    106

    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    The reference above states the level that is an “immediate danger to your life.”

    I will not expose my lungs to a vaporized chemical that is just recently seeing expanded use and has not been around long enough to expose health problems from long term use. Legal or illegal.

    The limits stated do not appear to refer to vapors inhaled. It says there is no inhalation data available.
    Last edited by adson; 11-16-2019 at 06:24 PM.

  21. #40
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    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Power For A Vaporizer

    Sometimes you need to read all the way down to the bottom of the page...

    Human data: It has been reported that the lethal oral dose is 15 to 30 grams [Webster 1930]. [Note: An oral dose of 15 to 30 grams is equivalent to a 30-minute exposure to 10,000 to 20,000 mg/m3 assuming a 50 liter per minute breathing rate and 100% absorption.]

    Revised IDLH: 500 mg/m3 [Unchanged]
    Basis for revised IDLH: No inhalation toxicity data are available on which to base an IDLH for oxalic acid. Therefore, based on acute oral toxicity data in humans [Webster 1930] and animals [Flury and Zernik 1935], the original IDLH for oxalic acid (500 mg/m3) is not being revised at this time.
    Because OA is extremely irritating to breathe in any quantity, one would be hard pressed to obtain anywhere near a lethal dose unless they were unconscious. Still, using proper PPE is always the smart move.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

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