new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monitoring - Page 4
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 82
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    117

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Hi Arnie, There is the 'Mite Zapper' electric heated drone elimination frame that will do that!

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    117

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    If insulating the bees in colder climates is the main aim of this new design, you could look to the A-Z hive from Eastern Europe. This is a vertical hive or multiple hives built into a bee house sothat the interior of the house can be heated if necessary keeping bees and keeper in a controlled enviorment!

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Somerset, NJ
    Posts
    348

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    When I insulated the outside of my hives the past winter with foam insulation they stayed too active and 3 of 4 starved. Yes, I fed syrup in the fall and put mountain camp on top in January. My hives did better without insulation. And no, I did not have a mite problem. I have also tried temperature sensors in the hives. They proceeded to propolize them. I think you're looking for a problem that doesn't exist.

  5. #64
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Issaquah,WA,USA
    Posts
    2,769

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Normal hives have horrible insulation. This makes it hard for bees to survive. We will be using advanced insulation technology to ensure your bees have the best lives possible. Just one less thing for you to worry about!
    So they have lived for thousands of years and did it wrong by not having good insulation? Really? How much experience does the this beekeeper have?

    The computer is getting smaller and smarter every year, and technology is making all of our lives easier. But, beekeeping is still just as complicated. This kickstarter will make it simple and uncomplicated!
    Lets make everyone think it is easy to keep bee's. they will keep buying packages from me year after year.

    This whole thing makes me laugh. But, the pet rock made money. Kickstarter is being abused with this kind of project. But, there are stupid people all over that will invest in this dog.

  6. #65
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Rockford, Illinois USA
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    deleted
    Last edited by IWASHERE; 10-31-2019 at 05:11 AM.
    Kickstarter pre-launch info link Sign up, itís really easy
    Blog

  7. #66

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Quote Originally Posted by jonsl View Post
    When I insulated the outside of my hives the past winter with foam insulation they stayed too active and 3 of 4 starved. Yes, I fed syrup in the fall and put mountain camp on top in January. My hives did better without insulation. And no, I did not have a mite problem. I have also tried temperature sensors in the hives. They proceeded to propolize them. I think you're looking for a problem that doesn't exist.

  8. #67
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,922

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    >Most all foam hives assume mostly open (and screened) bottom.

    That would certainly change things. But then it seems like it would undo the advantages of more insulation. When we get 60 mph winds and it's -20 F I don't think that gives them any advantage over a better sealed less insulated hive.

    >They do work.

    Obviously people are using them and succeeding. They did not work well for me.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  9. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    207

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Hive Enclosure Design: I am fifth year beekeeper who has done a lot of simple experimentation on hive design while learning to maintain a sustainable apiary. I have been successful in over-wintering hives and single 5-frame nucs with one bottom entrance/exit with screen board and sticky board in place, no top vents, 2-inch R10 insulation on 5 sides; location is coastal Rhode Island. I also have a little experience in thermal design, heat and mass transfer as well as humidity issues, etc. I monitor my hive design changes with simple technology. Dial and digital thermometers, thermocouples ( sometimes), weighting scales, multi-channel temperature and humidity weather station (cheap with surprising accuracy) and observations to go with the numbers. I am by no means finished in identifying all the requirements for an "installed hive enclosure design" or hive designs for a location with and without deep snow; quantifying CO2 absorption in snow is a bit of mystery. My location has significant humidity issues, high winds , very cold (typical 20 to 30F but periods down below zero) and very mild winters on a little farm. Some winters have lots of snow, Nor'easters measured in feet, some winters very little, 3-12 inches at a time.

    My accomplishments are simply defined; 1) able to feed 2:1 syrup all winter if necessary, especially when feeding a nuc, 2) have not drowned a bee in the hive ( feeders, etc. excluded from this comment), 3) hives, including frames, have been mostly mold free (I now use 12 oz. canvass as an inner cover, bottom area can and does support some mold via free water), 4) 2018 - 2019 I wintered over 11 insulated colonies in various hive sizes and hive shapes, zero winter losses but 2 queen problems caused Spring losses and 1 viral or Nosema loss in the Spring (no verification by testing). 5) I maintained a foam insulated top cover, canvass inner cover, no top vent all summer, including 90F+ days with high external ambient Relative Humidities - no problems, surprising temperature numbers. 6) I have a sustainable apiary with purchased and open-mated queens. 7) I have determined one guiding principle for hive enclosure investigation and design - Conservation of Energy, essential to survival. It seems all other problems or issues are just that, problems that need a design solution.

    Getting to my point - making conclusions about hive enclosure designs based on visual observations or anecdotal evidence will create a lot of false answers. Honey bees demonstrate the ability to sense their environment and are able to control their internal environment within honey bee physical limits (bee sensing and control abilities are mostly unknown but often indirectly identified). A comment on sensors. The ability to sense or measure humidity both by humans and bees is not easy. Humans have not had the ability to easily measure humidity at multiple points inside a hive until recently. New, tiny electronic sensors are becoming available and will likely change via test data our perception of and design requirements for hive enclosures. The number of independent hive design variables is large with complex relationships during the course of a one year honey bee colony life cycle. So, bee patient and don't declare (fool yourself) an enclosure answer until you have test numbers or logic based on sound physics based models. I do not having unlimited resources anymore. I shot-gun my test methods and live with "it seems to work, they are alive"! One of my next efforts is a year-round, R10 insulated hive, R20 for a top surface configuration. Hopefully I find or develop an affordable method for multi-point sensing of temperature and humidity in a hive soon.

  10. #69
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,922

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    > making conclusions about hive enclosure designs based on visual observations or anecdotal evidence will create a lot of false answers. Honey bees demonstrate the ability to sense their environment and are able to control their internal environment within honey bee physical limits (bee sensing and control abilities are mostly unknown but often indirectly identified).

    Yes. It's very hard to tell when you have or have not helped them when they adjust, but some of those adjustments cost a lot of energy. I'm sure some are better than others for winter. But how to tell...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  11. #70
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Ohio
    Posts
    1,223

    Question Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Quote Originally Posted by IWASHERE View Post
    Indeed. They're not mutually exclusive. Also, it's not a hyperbole. It is literally that much better.

    I notice a lot of you just making sarcastic remarks, but I'm actually working to address the many concerns that are going on in beekeeping. Also, Beekeeping has more or less stayed the same for decades now. Is it really hard to imagine that someone has improved upon what's out there?

    You can read - in detail- on what I've made, and how its better than what's out there.

    Check them out here:
    http://www.learningwithlowell.com/wh...of-beekeeping/
    http://www.learningwithlowell.com/wh...in-beekeeping/
    http://www.learningwithlowell.com/ho...ney-bee-hives/
    I've been in the business for over 4 decades and I hate to tell you beekeeping is NOT the same. I want to improve my honey yields. How is your new hives going to do that for me?????

  12. #71
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    207

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    "how to tell" what is good and working? This is the same question I asked of Dennis vanEngelsdorp when he was speaking in Ma. about BIP statistical data collection. He did not quite understand me at that time.

    It is a very difficult question to answer in a simple manner considering all the variables. I look at overall apiary performance, and some very simple data to support the conservation of energy principle; honey is the most easily measured metric and checked by hive weighing. Honey is a the primary form of bee energy stored for winter and dearths to be used by bees to generate heat. When monitoring sensor data and the measured temperature data is logical in a "physics" sense and supports conservation of energy for the hive, I buy-in until proven wrong. I also look for supporting or contradictory test literature. It maybe a coincidence but after 5 years of building up to nine hives and learning, feeding 2:1 heavily to a hive weight in the prior fall (M. Palmer's approach), the great "flow" season we had here, having very strong hives for the first time, standardizing my brood chambers (a choice to reduce intrusive inspections), using queen excluders, building more super hardware - I was swamped with seasonal honey. Of more importance was the excess, over-wintered honey I extracted before the spring flow - conserved energy. I also had one hive start brood rearing early (could see the temperature rise 20F above the cluster and supported by Owen's thermology report). This hive brought in over a 100 lb. of light spring honey (a first) and continued on all summer. This maybe a "one of" event. for the apiary. The contrast from "standard hives" with packages (5 of 6 died in two years) to home-grown bees with selected swarm cell queens and purchased VSh queens is likely typical but being able to save very weak, dying hives which turn into productive colonies is not typical. I also had three possible Nosema signs in the snow in front of the hives who survived and foraged well.

    A concept like venting the top of the hive with bottom entrances violates my senses. ( I am aware of your top exit only approach. A hive needs at elast one exit . ) Top venting is likely needed if you do not insulate the top as the bees cannot produce heat at a fast enough rate to prevent condensation on the inner cover surface so venting makes sense. But this is a waste of energy, using a top vent whn diffusion via the bottom is another venting path. Venting can exceed the bees abilities (dependent on cluster size); quilt boxes are a lot better. I went all-in my third year, about 6 hives, and bought 2-inch, R10 XPS foam. The premise was I would prevent prevent the ceiling from dripping below via dew point control ( I was nervous about this). I learned a lot more as the bees managed dew point for me (a hypothesis). The upper internal ambient remained between 50-60F all winter. Bees conducted cleansing flights as often or more often as compared to other FB bee club post. If the upper temperature dropped below 50F I can conclude I have a sick hive or in one case a very small cluster needing intensive care.

    The strangest event this year was ZERO swarm cells all season for 7 large hives plus one rebuilding hive and one fast growing nuc. Go figure, buckets of honey and no swarming. Now I have one very low varroa post treatment dead drop count NWC queened hive right through robbing season to deal with and learn.

    I am not sure I answeredd the question but I will keep it in mind and work on it over time.

  13. #72
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Issaquah,WA,USA
    Posts
    2,769

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    On a personal note, I'd like to see Kickstarter-related posts actively discouraged, or even banned. If you have views about this, then you might want to add them to this thread:
    https://www.beesource.com/forums/sho...-related-posts
    'best,
    LJ
    Boy do I agree with you. These people are trying to take advantage of the worry about keeping bee's alive. I think they are just as bad as the scam artists that target my 80 year old dad. Profiting on the ignorance of do gooders. There are no better ways to keep bee's.

    ADMINS BAN KICK-STARTER PEOPLE.

  14. #73
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    south central Ohio
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    What kind of hive is this guy actually selling? What does it look like?, how does it work?. Why do I need to provide an e-mail address to get any info on it?

  15. #74
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Fargo, North Dakota
    Posts
    259

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    The administrators of Beesource will be transferring these Kickstarter/GoFundMe-type threads to a special forum according to comments made in another thread — a wonderful decision to help isolate those seeking to separate beekeepers from their monies. Next suggestion to the administrators: do not allow any posts in that special forum to appear when a beekeeper uses the “New Posts” tool.

  16. #75
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,290

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Quote Originally Posted by Hankinohio18 View Post
    What kind of hive is this guy actually selling? What does it look like?, how does it work?. Why do I need to provide an e-mail address to get any info on it?
    As of this date, to the best of my knowledge, the hive is still in the developmental stage. There isn't really even a kickstarter for it yet. Sort of a pre-kickstarter where if you are interested, you sign up to get updates on progress and when the real kickstarter program will begin. So far there have not been any actual requests for, uh, "donations".

    The special forum for these projects is down at the bottom of the forums list in the "Exchange" section, where we all agree it belongs.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  17. #76
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5,061

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Quote Originally Posted by JTGaraas View Post
    The administrators of Beesource will be transferring these Kickstarter/GoFundMe-type threads to a special forum according to comments made in another thread — a wonderful decision to help isolate those seeking to separate beekeepers from their monies. Next suggestion to the administrators: do not allow any posts in that special forum to appear when a beekeeper uses the “New Posts” tool.
    Yes; otherwise they can just keep bumping the post to throw it before our eyes again. There may be the occasional unique idea that comes to light from such a process but it is so roundly abused that I dont think the idea has a net benefit to beekeeping. That is what this forum is about!
    Frank

  18. #77
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    10,867

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Note that a rule that bans/blocks/etc all Kickstarter type threads would also apply to this Michael Palmer thread:

    https://www.beesource.com/forums/sho...27#post1764127

    Whatever you may think about funding a "new beehive concept", in my opinion, Michael's project is in a different class entirely.


    I back that up by just now making a second modest contribution to go with my earlier contribution.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  19. #78
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ardnamurchan and Fife, Scotland
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Quote Originally Posted by Hankinohio18 View Post
    What kind of hive is this guy actually selling? What does it look like?, how does it work?. Why do I need to provide an e-mail address to get any info on it?
    I'm presuming it looks ... rusty. Unless it's stainless steel.

    I'm not sure the Tesla analogy is a good one. Aren't they still losing money?
    The Apiarist - beekeeping in Fife, Scotland

  20. #79
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Vauxhall, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    350

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    Has 'Iwashere' given any details, sketches etc. how he/she wants to solve the problem?

    And: don't bees have to die? Nothing lives forever. Drones are going now, late for us!

    I like to 'kickstart' somebody too.

    Need a new combine (used, new to me )

    I love the internet, soooo much fun.
    Summ Summ Bienchen summ herum

  21. #80

    Default Re: new beehive designed to stop bees from dying over winter, and to have 24/7 monito

    The issue isn't an aversion to improvement or innovation. There's an unending stream of innovation and novel ideas being tried in the beekeeping world these days.....including improved over-winter insulation schemes, in-hive cameras & sensors, and new hive body materials.

    The problem is first impressions. There is nothing about the presence of a camera, wireless sensors, or steel cladding that mitigates the loss habitat, exposure to pesticides, pathogens, and parasites that plague bees these days.

    The other problem is your proto-website uses an image of a traditional wooden hive that's choking under polluted skies, suffering next to defoliated trees, and under threat of a fast approaching Grim Reaper. This alone is rather hyperbolic but it's made worse by a subsequent image that suggests if people would just keep bees in a different kind of hive that dying environment will be automatically replaced with some idyllic spring meadow complete with flower fields, flourishing bees, and laughing children. As a concept prototype it does not bode well as it merely represents more marketing hype in the vein of "buy this hive and your bees will thrive".

    Surely you don't actually intend to say your hive design alone will make any given colony immune and impervious to Nosema, Varroa, AFB, Hive Beetles, and tracheal mites etc.? Far better to just say you've got some improved insulation properties and some high tech in-hive monitoring if you want to geek out what the bees tend to address naturally and according to their own instincts and desires......but will still need to practice standard bee management & treatment techniques to ward off the standard compliment of pests and diseases.

    There are no instant-cure-miracle-hives waiting in the wings.....there's only an impending crash or a long slow walk out of the dismal state of affairs we are currently in. Sorry.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •