Tilting the telescoping cover - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,804

    Default Re: Tilting the telescoping cover

    I think that we can agree that insulating the top keeps heat in. A ceiling that is kept relatively warmer will be subject to less or no condensation to drip on the cluster. Some air exchange is necessary to maintain oxygen and carbon dioxide levels. Excess air exchange is the enemy of heat retention. Bees either need to fly to eliminate or are inclined to do so. If you have a 2 or 3 deep colony with only bottom entrance that distance is an issue.

    If you have the top of a colony air tight and well insulated, ice and snow conditions and/or dead bees that thoroughly block a bottom only entrance will kill your bees.

    Different local weather conditions will alter the relative importance of these issues so it is up to you to decide which ones apply more to you.
    Frank

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Northeast PA
    Posts
    281

    Default Re: Tilting the telescoping cover

    Quote Originally Posted by Jackam View Post
    I always rest my telescoping cover on top of the inner cover so that it slants backwards.
    Someone told me to do it during the Winter so any moisture collects and runs to the back of the hive before it drips.
    Using an inner cover with the oval hole in the center, does the telescoping cover tilt really make any difference? I imagine that humidity collects most evenly on the inner cover, but maybe not. ::hrug:::

    Your thoughts?

    What have you decided?
    Last edited by username00101; 10-07-2019 at 09:07 AM.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Kirkland, WA
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: Tilting the telescoping cover

    I had tremendous success this year using quilting boxes. The moisture goes up through a layer of burlap and cedar shavings and condenses on the top. When it drips down, the water is caught by the shavings and burlap. There is a lot of ventalation up top as well. Here is a part of one of my videos showing them.

    https://youtu.be/q8IIcj3wDvk?t=37
    OldMontgomerysFarm.com
    Paul Montgomery -- C-I-E-I-O

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Tilting the telescoping cover

    Quote Originally Posted by TurtleSpider View Post
    That is what I do. I have never met anyone else who does it so I thought I must have invented that idea! Now I know other people far more knowledgeable about beekeeping than I am think it is a good idea too.
    There’s a saying in medicine, where I dabbled a while before becoming a backyard beekeeper, “if you think you’ve come up with a new idea, you don’t read German”.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Deep Brook, NS, Canada
    Posts
    599

    Default Re: Tilting the telescoping cover

    My Winters are a bit colder and longer than yours, so I cut a 2 inch by 3/8 inch notch in the rim of the inner cover, and screen off the center hole. That way, I can use it as a top entrance, or flip it for vent only. For Winter, I add a piece of 1 inch white Styrofoam to stop condensation, then I strap the whole thing together with a ratchet strap. We get some nasty storms around here.
    I want bees that make up for my mistakes.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Deep Brook, NS, Canada
    Posts
    599

    Default Re: Tilting the telescoping cover

    Quote Originally Posted by crofter View Post
    Some air exchange is necessary to maintain oxygen and carbon dioxide levels.
    Yep. A top entrance was something I learned pretty much on day 1. The bees convert honey into heat, and produce CO2 and water as waste products that need to be cleared away.
    A lot of people don't know either, that the bees don't heat the inside of the hive; only the cluster is warm, with the outside bees acting as insulation. It's important to keep them sheltered from the wind, but Langstroth knew back then that keeping them too warm meant they would use a lot more stores.
    I want bees that make up for my mistakes.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,804

    Default Re: Tilting the telescoping cover

    Quote Originally Posted by gnor View Post
    Yep. A top entrance was something I learned pretty much on day 1. The bees convert honey into heat, and produce CO2 and water as waste products that need to be cleared away.
    A lot of people don't know either, that the bees don't heat the inside of the hive; only the cluster is warm, with the outside bees acting as insulation. It's important to keep them sheltered from the wind, but Langstroth knew back then that keeping them too warm meant they would use a lot more stores.
    I agree with your general observations but disagree with this part, "that the bees don't heat the inside of the hive; only the cluster is warm". That would only be true if the bees were a perfect insulator. The heat that is lost from the bees is passed to the surrounding air. The ceiling of the hive is the main recipient which is well to be kept above the dew point so condensation does not occur.

    I agree that above a certain temperature the activity level increases along with stores consumption. Probably around 38 - 40 F. Temperatures below this though, rapidly cause incremental increase in stores consumption so insulation is a balancing act. Insulation factor that also dissipates the 4 gallons or so produced moisture and accommodates air exchange is the real trick.

    I am a fan of the box of loose shavings for a top. Am in the process at the moment.
    Frank

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