Is it feasible to control swarming without performing a spring split? - Page 6
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  1. #101
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR, USA
    Posts
    36

    Default Re: Is it feasible to control swarming without performing a spring split?

    I think Mike you have answered your own question. Perhaps this is up to all who are willing to suffer the losses, and when enough resistant bee colonies exist queens could be A.I. just like they do now for other things. As this grows there would hopefully come a time when even large commercial operations could get enough queens and packages that their losses would be tolerable.

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  3. #102
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Deep Brook, NS, Canada
    Posts
    599

    Default Re: Is it feasible to control swarming without performing a spring split?

    just remove the queen with a few frames and some bees - small split.
    That makes a lot of sense now especially if you already have capped swarm cells. Last year, I removed the frames with cells on them and they still swarmed. Removing the queen would fix that.
    I want bees that make up for my mistakes.

  4. #103
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    75

    Default

    Not necessarily, gnor. If there are enough bees (relative to space) for an after swarm, the first (few) virgin(s) to emerge will still swarm. If you have cells and you don't want to split with them you can
    1. Remove queen with enough brood/food for a split
    2. Leave colony tight for a few days until first cells are capped (so they are well fed) then
    3. put a super of comb in between brood boxes to relieve congestion before new queens emerge. 1 week window....
    I do this as a quick way to increase my odds. I don't like trying to destroy every queen cell (or all but 2...) as invariably I miss a runty one in the corner somewhere and wind up with a dinky queen. This would result in the same productivity of a swarmed colony plus the added work of me trying to change what the bees have done. When this happens I might as well have let them swarm....
    So even if you remove the old queen, you still need to keep an eye on the other factors that contribute to swarming....
    Happy beekeeping everyone

  5. #104
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Claiborne County, East Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    81

    Default Re: Is it feasible to control swarming without performing a spring split?

    I for one am not doing anything to prevent mine from swarming. If
    they swarm I will lose some production it is true but I will gain more
    bees. If you split them all you are doing is making a swarm on your own
    terms. Swarming is not a bad thing. I have ten hives and that is all I want
    at this time. If I gain more that that I will be putting them in nucs and selling

    them.
    Some days it's not worth chewing through the restraints.

  6. #105
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Tehachapi, California, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Is it feasible to control swarming without performing a spring split?

    I hope those swarms aren't Africanized. Here in Central California hive management is key to preventing hot hives. Nothing is more demoralizing than having to euthanize a hot hive.

    http://pinkpages.chrisbacherconsulting.com/ This site was developed to capture George Imire's Pink Pages. He was a master beekeeper. You might want to find his notes on swarming. He wrote many article on the topic.

  7. #106
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    2,533

    Default Re: Is it feasible to control swarming without performing a spring split?

    Prior to and during swarm season, prevent the bees from forming a solid band of honey immediately over the brood area by removing every other honey frame and replacing it with an empty frame. Or let them swarm.
    David Matlock

  8. #107
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Claiborne County, East Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    81

    Default Re: Is it feasible to control swarming without performing a spring split?

    We really don't have to worry about Africanized bees here in East Tennessee, so that is a non issue.

  9. #108
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    1,440

    Default Re: Is it feasible to control swarming without performing a spring split?

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverderwent View Post
    Prior to and during swarm season, prevent the bees from forming a solid band of honey immediately over the brood area by removing every other honey frame and replacing it with an empty frame. Or let them swarm.
    This is not my experience. I quite like a band of honey near top of top brood box. Once I get this and nectar/honey in first honey super, I can remove the queen excluder. I find an excluder to be a significant cause of getting nectar in the brood nest. I then focus on maintaining storage space for honey and thereby keeping the brood nest open. Add honey supers and extract weekly(return wet supers to hive) during peak of the flow.

    Band of honey generally keeps the queen in the brood boxes.
    Zone 3b. If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got!

  10. #109
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Is it feasible to control swarming without performing a spring split?

    Check out Wally Shore's description of a Snelgrove Board ( England ) and it's many uses. I used it last successfully. I looked forward to using it htis year but - believe it or not - no swarm cells with 8 foraging hives. I guess they were too busy filling honey supers this year. I think I will not be so lucky next year. http://www.wbka.com/wp-content/uploa...Wally-Shaw.pdf

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