Honey bottles in car
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
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    Columbus, Ohio
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    45

    Default Honey bottles in car

    I sell honey at work, but don't want to take a bunch of plastic bottles in with me in the morning. Would they be safe in the car in the parking lot in central Ohio this time of year? I don't want it getting too hot during the day.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    Default Re: Honey bottles in car

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankBarbee View Post
    I sell honey at work. Would they be safe in the car in the parking lot?
    Sure they will be safe. Where do you park your car?
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  4. #3
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    Apr 2017
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    Aylett, Virginia
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    3,846

    Default Re: Honey bottles in car

    Ok, so my attempt at humor fell flat. I would not keep honey in a car. On a sunny, but not even hot day, the interior temperature can easily climb into the 130 range. Not good for the plastic jars or the raw honey you intend to sell.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
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    Columbus, Ohio
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    45

    Default Re: Honey bottles in car

    That is what I thought..

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Hartford Ohio
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    98

    Default Re: Honey bottles in car

    Quote Originally Posted by JWPalmer View Post
    Ok, so my attempt at humor fell flat. I would not keep honey in a car. On a sunny, but not even hot day, the interior temperature can easily climb into the 130 range. Not good for the plastic jars or the raw honey you intend to sell.
    Good answer, as a matter of fact so was the first, needed a little humor

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    frederick, md
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    840

    Default Re: Honey bottles in car

    I have left honey in the car, forgetting to pull it out after the market. Temp in the car who knows, but horrible hot,we were in the 90's, but the honey in the bottles was only around 120, used my instant on temperature gauge. It was in there most of the day. Packed tight into boxes. Surprised me it was that cool.
    No problem picking up the bottles, not hot enough to burn the hands.
    Zone 6b: 27 hives in Maryland, Carniolan, Italian mix mutts: Still learning - started bees spring of 2014.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Hartford Ohio
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    98

    Default Re: Honey bottles in car

    Quote Originally Posted by missybee View Post
    I have left honey in the car, forgetting to pull it out after the market. Temp in the car who knows, but horrible hot,we were in the 90's, but the honey in the bottles was only around 120, used my instant on temperature gauge. It was in there most of the day. Packed tight into boxes. Surprised me it was that cool.
    No problem picking up the bottles, not hot enough to burn the hands.
    Is it possible that the the fact they were packed in tight boxes somewhat insulated them?

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    London Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default

    I put it in a good quality cooler and although the car is hot the jars of honey stay slightly above room temperature. I pull the cooler when I get home and set it in the house with AC. The trick is finding the right sized cooler.

  10. #9
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    Sep 2014
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    frederick, md
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    840

    Default Re: Honey bottles in car

    Quote Originally Posted by edzkoda View Post
    Is it possible that the the fact they were packed in tight boxes somewhat insulated them?
    Maybe, it was the normal boxes the plastic bottles come in. The lids were all open. Just each box full of bottles. If the honey was over 115 I would think that you would feel a burning pain. I had no problem handling the bottles, even the metal lids on a few glass bottles. It just felt warm. And it was a all day sunny day. I remembered them around 430p or so. The market was the evening before, night temps were sitting in the mid 70ish
    Zone 6b: 27 hives in Maryland, Carniolan, Italian mix mutts: Still learning - started bees spring of 2014.

  11. #10
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    Sep 2014
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    frederick, md
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    840

    Default Re: Honey bottles in car

    After the above discussion, I decided to do a quick check.

    I did a test today, one 2 lb plastic jar placed in the car this am, outside temperature got to 88f, full sun. The inside of the car was reading over 140f.

    The honey around 10am was 99f, around noon it was 105f, around 4pm it was 115, that was as high as it went. The bottle was in the back of my car and I know the sun also hit it.

    I was using my instant on thermometer also cross tested with a glass thermometer.
    Zone 6b: 27 hives in Maryland, Carniolan, Italian mix mutts: Still learning - started bees spring of 2014.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Boston, MA, USA
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    255

    Default

    You can keep the honey in a lunch cooler. It will have enough thermal mass to stay close to room temperature.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
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    3,148

    Default Re: Honey bottles in car

    I would not actually worry of the honey heat "spoiling" in a car.
    At least it should be qualified and conditional.

    Honey (as liquid) has enough thermal capacity; it will take LONG time before it will gain the same temperature as the air around it (air is much weaker heat conductor then water, to compare).
    For sure not quickly (several hours in direct sun).

    Even more sure not to worry if you do some simple steps to insulate the honey (a couple of blankets on the top; a cardboard box; a foam box/cooler).
    If you can park in shade or under cover, even less of an issue.

    I kept honey supers (under a blanket) in full sun for better extraction and did not loose sleep.
    Not a problem.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

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