Speed of adaptation....
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  1. #1
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    Default Speed of adaptation....

    It postulated to take forever for the natural evolution to change anything.

    Well, here again, a case showing the ongoing adaptation caused by rapidly changing environment.
    Just 250-300 years of industrial life-style already are showing profound affects on the human morphology (that's for a slow breeding mammalian species, not a bug).

    We can call this phenomenon "artificial selection" and qualify it as "reversible", if we so prefer.
    It's OK for better or for worse.

    Anyways, this thing is happening fast.
    Really fast.
    It does not take an evolution.

    ....over the last 250 years, our skulls have morphed in dangerous and troubling ways.
    https://onezero.medium.com/our-skull...s-f950faed696d
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Speed of adaptation....

    And a related article by a researcher I knew personally (just one of many his works).

    ....although in the initial phase of adaptation to any new factor the organism is close to the limits of its capacities, the manner in which it solves the problem is far from perfect. However, if the person or animal concerned survives, and the causal agent of adaptation continues to be active, the possibilities open to the organism increase and the extreme or urgent stage is replaced by one of effective, stable adaptation.
    https://www.questia.com/magazine/1G1...eme-conditions
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Speed of adaptation....

    .
    As always Greg you are absolutely correct, and i have irrefutable proof of your concept.

    Last edited by Oldtimer; 09-23-2019 at 04:29 PM.
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Speed of adaptation....

    Took this cricket just 20 generations to evolve.

    https://www.nature.com/news/evolutio...ickets-1.15323

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Speed of adaptation....

    The article says "To protect themselves from their new enemy, large numbers of male crickets on the Hawaiian island of Kauai quickly stopped chirping".

    However that would be incorrect, and similar logic is often used in the beekeeping world.

    What would have really happened would have been that at least one individual with a non chirping mutation already existed. And once all the chirping individuals started to get eaten by the introduced predator, the feild was left open for the non chirping one.

    Had the predator not been introduced, the non chirping individual would have had little show of attracting a mate, and likely would have dissapeared from the population.

    One thing we learn from this, is that wether a mutation is good or bad, can depend on circumstances at the time. Which is why we do not necessarily want to eliminate any bee genetics even that sometimes seen as bad, or weak. Because if classic TF beekeeping lingo was applied to those crickets, the chirping ones would be referred to as "weak" and the non chirping ones as "survivors". But change the circumstances, ie, not have the predator, the reverse would be the case, the non chirping unable to attract a mate cricket would have been the "weak", and the chirping ones would have been the "survivors".
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Speed of adaptation....

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    What would have really happened would have been that at least one individual with a non chirping mutation already existed. And once all the chirping individuals started to get eaten by the introduced predator, the feild was left open for the non chirping one.
    Right. The "weak" or "defective" cricket with mutated or improperly developed sounding spines perhaps saved the species. Whereas this cricket's lineage may have been bred out of existence over time due to their lack of ability to attract a mate, the environmental pressures radically changed, favoring the mutation. The favored trait of chirping became the weakness or the defect.

    This was not a learned adaptation by the cricket. The cricket now does not possess the hardware to actually make the sound. It was a physical trait that was brought forward through environmental pressures.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Speed of adaptation....

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    It postulated to take forever for the natural evolution to change anything.
    By whom? Scientists have been measuring the speed of evolution for over a century and have a pretty good idea of how fast it goes. New traits can emerge (or old traits disappear) in a small handful of generations - e.g. a century if your talking about elephants, an afternoon if talking about bacteria...

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Speed of adaptation....

    >What would have really happened would have been that at least one individual with a non chirping mutation already existed. And once all the chirping individuals started to get eaten by the introduced predator, the feild was left open for the non chirping one.

    This is exactly right. It's just selection.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

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