healty hives that refuse to store food - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 45
  1. #21

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Have you done a recent mite count?

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Sisters, Oregon
    Posts
    90

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    2+ on OldTimer suggestion- pile it on. There is a difference in how they use it when it's trickling in as opposed to gushing in. I don't know...unless they are sick...I just think there may be something obvious we're missing. My biggest mistake in feeding this year was adding ProHealth to my syrup. They HATED it. Dead and drowned bees and no interest.

    I'm using ProSweet for most of my fall feed this year and loving it. Already inverted and ready to store. Also had my crazy strong hive assigned to emergency feed so I have frames in reserve.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Plymouth, MA USA
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    FWIW, all 3 of my hives last year consumed 2:1 continuously starting early September, but peak weight gain was September 15. From then on, they took the syrup but appeared to consume it as fast as they took it because they never put on any more weight. Couldn't figure it out - no indications of robbing. I had to put on sugar blocks (8 lbs) as they were going into winter light. The most any hive used was about half a block. They all made it through winter with stores still on hand (to my relief, not to say surprise).

  5. #24
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR, USA
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Gillmore View Post
    You are probably not going to be able to do anything to change this, sounds like genetics. A package producer in the the south would love to have one of those queens but they don't work out so well in the northern states where we need colonies to slow down brooding in the fall and prepare for winter.

    I've had a few like this too. Because they were such good honey producers in the summer months I kept them alive over the winters with sugar blocks. You need to make a choice to either work with them or replace the queens with NWC or something more frugal in the fall/winter months. If they are not good honey producers then queen replacement would be in order.
    Something is causing a change in the bees behavior from summer to fall, if they are storing honey in summer and then quit.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    5,585

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Quote Originally Posted by unstunghero View Post
    Something is causing a change in the bees behavior from summer to fall, if they are storing honey in summer and then quit.
    That's a good point. With these colonies I would pull supers and then later in late summer/early fall instead of slowing down on brood rearing and storing up honey for winter as the other hives do they would continue brooding up like it was spring time and burn through everything they brought in or were fed. Supplemental feeding of sugar blocks kept them alive through the winter months.
    To everything there is a season....

  7. #26
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR, USA
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Gillmore View Post
    That's a good point. With these colonies I would pull supers and then later in late summer/early fall instead of slowing down on brood rearing and storing up honey for winter as the other hives do they would continue brooding up like it was spring time and burn through everything they brought in or were fed. Supplemental feeding of sugar blocks kept them alive through the winter months.
    Two things come to mind, 1. somehow they have a reduced number of foragers. 2. maybe try open feeding if possible, they will bring in syrup so fast they can't use it all.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Monticello, AR
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    My very first hive was a feral swarm that I caught in a trap. The first year they didn't produce honey but I was expecting that. The second year I got more hives and they caught up with and passed my original hive which didn't produce for a second year despite appearing healthy. The third year I finally got a decent honey crop from all hives EXCEPT the original which seemed to be thriving otherwise. The fourth year I replaced the queen and ended up with a super of honey for the first time. I stopped feeding them after the first year but they always seemed to have enough for themselves. I call them my survivors since they were my first bees and have never given me problems or honey.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,916

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Quote Originally Posted by unstunghero View Post
    Two things come to mind, 1. somehow they have a reduced number of foragers. 2. maybe try open feeding if possible, they will bring in syrup so fast they can't use it all.
    Per my observations, my "lazy" bees have more than enough foragers; they simply sit about and do nothing as long as they have food NOW.
    IF they are still alive 2-3 months from now, a pile of dry sugar will do for them.

    Open feeding is bad in so many ways, best to just avoid it for the sake of other bees.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Hathaway, CA
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    I would consider using pulling brood from the hive not storing food and placing the brood in your weaker hives. Then pull capped honey/syrup from another hive and giving to the hive not storing... and back feeding the hive that you robbed from that is willing to store syrup.....

  11. #30

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Yes, I agree. It would be easy to count foragers carrying pollen for a few minutes, and compare with a healthy hive that is taking syrup. My guess is the foragers are infected, but not the house bees. That is supposedly a common pattern. In that case, there would be relatively few foragers in the hives not taking syrup.
    While I lost the hives to dysentery, I don't think it was necessarily caused by Nosema. More likely due to inept beekeeping. Never checked for Nosema.

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    woodland, wa usa
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Quote Originally Posted by dudelt View Post
    Every year I have a couple of hives that just refuse to store enough food for winter. They are good sized hives with no apparent disease or mite issues. They have an endless supply of feed on the hive at the moment but only take enough to keep them going and are storing nothing. Half the frames in some boxes are totally empty. In my area, the cold weather in October, especially in the mornings, means they will take in very little so you have to be done feeding by the end of September. In the past, I have busted my hump to keep them alive in winter with sugar blocks but I am wondering what everyone else does. I have not had a hive starve over the winter in years because of the sugar blocks. Do you see the same thing in your hives?
    Me, never seen that. Even last year when the flow (rain) ended mid May and was followed by +-5 months dearth, my hives for the most part had honey crowns formed in their top deeps by backfilling emerged cells with nectar, and sending queenie downstairs with the brood. And yes, that included honey above in the med supers.

    Once my hives come out of winter they begin their buildup. This begins (depending on weather) in Jan, when nut trees are hanging pollen tassels. But by late Mar, hives are near always well on their way, here, SW WA. The flow is short, generally Mar - Jun/Jul depending, mainly maple and blackberry. This year, essentially by the end of Jun, crowns were formed. I do not feed either sugar water nor pollen sub during the dearth, and I expect my gals to hunker down, and ration that capped honey crown for winter, even though they stored it 4-6 months prior.

    This may be vastly different to a hive started near the middle to end of the flow in any given year.

  13. #32
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR, USA
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    Per my observations, my "lazy" bees have more than enough foragers; they simply sit about and do nothing as long as they have food NOW.
    IF they are still alive 2-3 months from now, a pile of dry sugar will do for them.

    Open feeding is bad in so many ways, best to just avoid it for the sake of other bees.
    The only (potentially) negative thing with open feeding would be transferring disease, and this has not been a problem. Most bad things about open feeding seem to stem from having the station too close to your hives. Normally I only open feed to stop , yes stop, robbing. I mentioned this as a possible way to get a lot of syrup in a hive quickly.

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,916

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Quote Originally Posted by unstunghero View Post
    The only (potentially) negative thing with open feeding would be transferring disease, and this has not been a problem. Most bad things about open feeding seem to stem from having the station too close to your hives. Normally I only open feed to stop , yes stop, robbing. I mentioned this as a possible way to get a lot of syrup in a hive quickly.
    Open feeding means - you maybe polluting someone else's honey with your syrup (without consulting them of course and probably not even tainting your syrup used in open feeding).
    There are other considerations, but think of this one for a start.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  15. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,760

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    I can see open feeding as an option for a sideliner or bigger operation due to labor costs, but for us hobby beeks, open feeding is a big no no. Tainting someone else's honey is not an issue here in VA, there is no fall flow and no one has honey supers on. It would be a huge concern in areas that do have a fall flow. For me it is the economics. With open feeding, you are feeding every one else's bees like it or not, and every yellow jacket in the neighborhood. Additionally, your stronger hives that don't really need it are going to get the lion's share, while the weaker hives that are below weight will continue to be under supplied. JM2C.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  16. #35
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Mountain Village,Alaska
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    As a new beekeeper,I thought I could jar feed my hives up to weight. Nope Not happening with my bees. I had to open feed, or starve them. I have not found a feeder that works as good as they can.

  17. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    10,038

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    I have never open fed, have seen it done though.

    My reason for feeding hives into their own individual feeders is simply that hives that don't need a feed don't have any wasted on them, hives that need a lot can be given a lot, and hives that just need a little can be given a little.

    Oh and the other biggy, where I am there will always be other bees within range. If i feed a ton of sugar, I want my bees to get that ton, all of it.
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

  18. #37
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR, USA
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    Open feeding means - you maybe polluting someone else's honey with your syrup (without consulting them of course and probably not even tainting your syrup used in open feeding).
    There are other considerations, but think of this one for a start.
    You know, I hadn't considered that ( tainting others honey), I will try and only do this to stop robbing even if there is an ongoing dearth. I guess I assumed that if my honey boxes were pulled, so would everybody's. Thanks for pointing that out. Now how about some others, I'm all eyes.

  19. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,760

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Yukonjeff, check out the Beemax feeder from Betterbee or the Ceracell feeder. Both do an excellent job at laying the feed to the bees with practically no drowning.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  20. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    5,585

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Quote Originally Posted by yukonjeff View Post
    I had to open feed, or starve them. I have not found a feeder that works as good as they can
    1 Gallon chick waterers are my choice for in hive feeding in cooler weather. I lay a piece of 3/4" rope in the tray and none of the bees drown or get stuck in the syrup. In mild weather the pail can be placed above an inner cover inside an empty deep as seen below.

    When the temperatures dip and flying weather is limited, but you still need to get feed to the bees, the inner cover can be removed and the waterer can be placed right on the top bars. Heat from the cluster rises and warms the feeder and syrup enough so they continue to take the syrup.

    Not my preferred method of getting the hives into wintering condition, but it works in a pinch if the season is winding down and the hive is light on stores.

    To everything there is a season....

  21. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,916

    Default Re: healty hives that refuse to store food

    Quote Originally Posted by yukonjeff View Post
    As a new beekeeper,I thought I could jar feed my hives up to weight. Nope Not happening with my bees. I had to open feed, or starve them. I have not found a feeder that works as good as they can.
    Feeding inside a hive body by a gallon is so trivial and I don't even know why this is such a problem.
    No special feeders are needed.
    Another unnecessary over-engineering problem.

    Here (I just reuse the empty coffee bags or any similar sturdy plastic bags that will stand-upright when full - easy enough to prop them up if have to).
    20180923_161919.jpg
    20180923_161511.jpg
    20180924_190409.jpg
    20180923_162136.jpg

    4 coffee bags take a gallon (a quarter each).
    Depending on the intake, it can be only a couple of bags per a hive OR as many as you want.
    Now days I feed my nucs and check/refill the bags once per week.

    Any container works just the same:
    - empty plastic lunch containers from recycling work great too (may need to drill few holes for bee access)
    - fill it up with sticks or grass or even crumbled paper
    - fill the container with the *tainted* syrup
    - place it inside the hive bode (empty box above the frames OR to the side towards the end in cases of long hives (my typical case)

    Really that simple.
    Don't worry of bees drowning - they don't, as long as you provided enough scaffolding.
    Last edited by GregV; 09-21-2019 at 04:04 PM.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •