Giganto Hive: How to get them to condense resources - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    10,147

    Default Re: Giganto Hive: How to get them to condense resources

    Quote Originally Posted by Fern View Post
    Okay, so the COMPLETELY empty super (no frames, no nothing) goes on top of the top board, with remaining wet stuff in a super above that? Just attempting to clarify. No challenge.
    Kinda.

    First off, the other posters give excellent advice also, there are many ways to achieve a good result. My suggestion is just one way, of several good ways.

    But if you reduce the hive and try to encourage them to move the stores to the bottom, you would first let the bees get accustomed to their new sized hive for a couple of weeks. Then take the outer and inner cover off and put the completely empty box on, then the honey boxes on that. If there are combs in the box, there is a connection to the honey boxes so the bees may see the whole thing as their hive and not move the honey. The empty box is to create a seperation from where the bees intend to winter.
    The idea is they now see this honey as too far away for winter supplies, so bring it down to the main hive. This is temperature dependant, if it's getting too cold they won't do it.
    Also they will clean out uncapped cells quick enough, but may leave the capped cells. You could extract this for yourself, or if you want the bees to have it, scrape the caps off to encourage the bees to move it.
    "Every viewpoint, is a view from a point." - Solomon Parker

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Story County, IA, USA
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: Giganto Hive: How to get them to condense resources

    I mean, it's a good thing to have a 3-pound hive take off like gangbusters. I'm feeding, but still trying to force them down into the center core. But, goodness, these ladies are testing me. Tomorrow, if sunny, is another day for feeding and removing any combs which are empty. Combs go directly into the bee-dedicated freezer I had to buy after a moth trauma last year, in which all my combs were infiltrated with moths. Yeah, so, everything goes into the freezer for freezing before coming into the basement.

    I operate like Hannibal Lector, once frozen, boxes are defrosted inside, then wrapped in black plastic bags, sealed with duct tape and labled as to contents ("Not drawn comb," "drawn but brood comb," "good drawn comb"). I feel a little creepy with the duct tape and black plastic bags.

    Now, I gotta get someone to help me move the bee chest freezer into the basement for winter. It's not certified for outside temps of freezing. Anyone in the Des Moines area available to move a freezer to the basement? It's only 80 pounds, but it's not something I can do myself, as I can't tip it more than 45 degrees as that messes up the coolant. I can offer a good dinner and money.

    I find the bees so interesting, and so do my students. "Hey professor, can we get another bee story?"

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Greenville, NC, USA
    Posts
    186

    Default Re: Giganto Hive: How to get them to condense resources

    FERN... take a deep breath! You need to ENJOY your bees but not get frustrated. Everything is based on location; North, South, urban, city, coastal, mountains, rangeland. I live in an urban area and within a 2 mile radius there are 10 big neighborhoods and an 18 hole golf course. NORMALLY we have rain at least every two weeks, plenty of blooming flowers, cotton fields, and soy beans. This year we are in our 3rd week of drought after a 3 day hurricane event. Some pollen but no nectar, and robbing is terrible. I have 14 deep frames of uncapped honey from the spring that I'm feeding so they will make winter bees. I froze it and then put it in the refrigerator until i pull it out to give the bees (late in the evening). Put the brood in the bottom 2 boxes and honey/feed in another box on top. They will move the honey where it needs to be. THEY KNOW WHAT TO DO.

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