inner cover questions
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Naples FL
    Posts
    22

    Default inner cover questions

    I've not been using my inner covers for the few hives that I have, after looking at them for months sitting in my garage I decided there must be a reason they exist so I installed them. Are they to make the hives cooler? Which way are they supposed to go, one side has more relief than the other? So I should still use them when I have supers installed?
    Thanks

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,597

    Default Re: inner cover questions

    We run migratory covers so don’t use them. With telescoping covers we would use them to prevent the telescoping covers from getting glued down tight. You can add ventilation, important in both summer for drying honey and winter for exhausting moisture, by propping the outer cover up just a bit in the front. The smaller side should be down in summer, the deep side down in winter. By having the deeper side down in winter you can put a winter patty directly over the cluster and and in late winter a good brood builder patty, both of which should be on every overwintered hive.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    1,080

    Default Re: inner cover questions

    The inner cover keeps the telescoping cover from being propolized down. You might not have noticed it yet because a new hive still has lots of places for bees to to stick propolis. If your inner cover has a notch then you can use it for an upper entrance. Place the inner cover on the hive with the notch down on the front side. Then install the telescoping cover. To open the upper entrance, push the telescoping cover all the way forward. To close the upper entrance pull the telescoping cover all the way backwards. This feature is is why it is called a telescoping cover. An upper entrance gives bees returning with nectar a way in and out of the hive without ascending through the brood nest. If you use a queen excluder then it is essential and also gives the hive a drone escape. In the summer and early fall you can ventilate the hive by putting a penny or popsicle stick on the top corners of the inner cover. This keeps the telescoping cover slightly elevated with a 1/16" rim opening all the way around. The rim opening is protected from wind by the skirt of the telescoping cover. This rim slit helps the hive hive shed some humidity from the honey dehydration without opening up a large opening though which other insects or robber bees can enter.

    When I have a super on I usually skip over it during inspections. I flip the telescoping cover over on the ground to give me a place to stack the boxes. I leave the inner cover on the super, and just lift it off and set it on the upside down telescoping cover. That way I don't disturb the workers in the super and the super remains covered and protected against opportunistic bees that might want to dart in and rob the super if it was completely uncovered.
    Zone 5B

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,754

    Default

    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    ToweringOakFarm - Cleveland- Southern East Texas
    Posts
    57

    Default Re: inner cover questions

    Quote Originally Posted by JConnolly View Post
    The inner cover keeps the telescoping cover from being propolized down. You might not have noticed it yet because a new hive still has lots of places for bees to to stick propolis. If your inner cover has a notch then you can use it for an upper entrance. Place the inner cover on the hive with the notch down on the front side. Then install the telescoping cover. To open the upper entrance, push the telescoping cover all the way forward. To close the upper entrance pull the telescoping cover all the way backwards. This feature is is why it is called a telescoping cover. An upper entrance gives bees returning with nectar a way in and out of the hive without ascending through the brood nest. If you use a queen excluder then it is essential and also gives the hive a drone escape. In the summer and early fall you can ventilate the hive by putting a penny or popsicle stick on the top corners of the inner cover. This keeps the telescoping cover slightly elevated with a 1/16" rim opening all the way around. The rim opening is protected from wind by the skirt of the telescoping cover. This rim slit helps the hive hive shed some humidity from the honey dehydration without opening up a large opening though which other insects or robber bees can enter.

    When I have a super on I usually skip over it during inspections. I flip the telescoping cover over on the ground to give me a place to stack the boxes. I leave the inner cover on the super, and just lift it off and set it on the upside down telescoping cover. That way I don't disturb the workers in the super and the super remains covered and protected against opportunistic bees that might want to dart in and rob the super if it was completely uncovered.
    I was wondering why they called it telescoping lid. Thanks for the info.

    Can you explain migratory covers?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,712

    Default Re: inner cover questions

    The telescoping top overlaps or telescopes over the hive body on all four sides. A migratory cover is flush along the sides and allows the hive to be placed next to each other for transport, the migratory part.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Sisters, Oregon
    Posts
    85

    Default Re: inner cover questions

    Another inner cover choice is a Vivaldi board design. I switched everything over to that and Iím very happy. It helps with ventilation and keeping the hive dry over winter and cool in the summer. Also gives you a hole in the middle to feed through.

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