Engineering Project

View Poll Results: Are beehives to heavy?

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  • Yes

    3 50.00%
  • No

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Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1

    Default Engineering Project

    I am a Pre-Engineering student and for my project I need to know if bee hives are to heavy to easily transport

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lumpkin County, GA
    Posts
    875

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    There are several devices that will move hives.
    If you want an engineering project, get a robot to photograph both sides of every frame in a hive. A hive can consist of multiple boxes so the robot will have to be able to go through all boxes. Design the robot so that it will navigate itself through an apiary and check hives which are programmed.
    Also, as an engineering student, you need to have correct grammar. You need to say " I need to know if bee hives are too heavy to be easily transported".
    Best of luck!

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Nacogdoches, TX, USA
    Posts
    217

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    Interested to hear about your project...

    Ryan

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Litchfield, Ct, USA
    Posts
    254

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    Quote Originally Posted by beeteam6 View Post
    I am a Pre-Engineering student and for my project I need to know if bee hives are to heavy to easily transport
    A strangely vague and subjective question. Not too heavy for some, but too heavy for others would be my vague response.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    632

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    Quote Originally Posted by ericweller View Post
    Also, as an engineering student, you need to have correct grammar.
    As an engineer most engineers have horrible spelling and poor grammer. I think having handwriting that others can read will be way more important than grammer.

    My big hive right now is about 375 lbs, so it is way to heavy (and tall at 6 ft) to move. My hives do not move so I have not answered the poll, because I am not sure my answer would be beneficial to you. I can see a good affordable way to move hives being useful to others, but not to me.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Litchfield, Ct, USA
    Posts
    254

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    Quote Originally Posted by elmer_fud View Post
    As an engineer most engineers have horrible spelling and poor grammer. I think having handwriting that others can read will be way more important than grammer.

    My big hive right now is about 375 lbs, so it is way to heavy (and tall at 6 ft) to move. My hives do not move so I have not answered the poll, because I am not sure my answer would be beneficial to you. I can see a good affordable way to move hives being useful to others, but not to me.
    One of the most brilliant engineers I've ever worked with (actually THE most brilliant) had horrible grammar. I guess his mind had better things to think about.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lumpkin County, GA
    Posts
    875

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    My teachers (UCF) never let me slide. Where I ended up in software engineering, I have to write a bit of documentation so I'm glad the teachers were critical.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,278

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    My technical report writing instructor, back when I was in college and considering engineering as my major, was a real stickler for proper grammer and especially punctuation. I remember one paper in which I wrote 2-1/2" as 2 1/2", leaving out the hyphen. Did it a few times on the same paper and lost two points for each occurrence. Cost me an entire letter grade on the paper. Ouch.

    At least the bees don't care so much about punctuation. However, I understand that spelling is their thing.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  10. #9

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    Curious about your engineering project results, @beeteam6. Here's one reference that helped me a lot with the general apps and tools, and weighing hacks on the PerfectBee webpage: https://www.perfectbee.com/blog/weig...ve-why-and-how

    Also: another topic about the hive size - https://www.beesource.com/forums/sho...too-big-strong

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    622

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    You can move any hive with a proper handtruck.Elmer fuds might take 3 trips!

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Wakefield, Rhode Island, USA
    Posts
    203

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    Jimbo3: Poor grammar skills and ignoring it is not smart. I had to get a dictionary and learn but I cheated - viewgraphs with few words, talk and lots of facts. It's amazing how a spelling error captivates the attention of the audience when noted. Distractions are powerful weapons. Pre-engineering student is what age, education level, native language, etc?

    Beeteam6: My answer is you have to realize it varies with the time of year and location. A hive can also be reduced in size or weight by management techniques. When you move it during the day is also important (when all the bees are inside) as well as how far. My lowest weight hives are about 90 - 100 pounds after removing honey supers and before feeding syrup in the early Fall. This weight also occurs in the early spring just before Dandelion blooming starts. As noted earlier the hive can get very heavy, over 300 lb.

    Great idea! Asking a bee group for information as you develop your list of requirements for your project plans is a good start. I'm old now but still use my dictionary (Google helps) to learn definitions of words, very surprising at times , working on writing skills

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Scott county, Arkansas, Usa
    Posts
    1,534

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    I'm just guessing, but I think maybe Beeteam6 is thinking about designing hives that would be more beneficial for commercial beeks. If so posting in the Commercial Beekeeping forum would be more helpful.

    Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    I am wondering about the context of the question.
    Traditional Langstroths? Are they too heavy to mobilize on a commercial scale? Seems to be happening, even specialized truck decks and trailers have been developed to move many, many hives at once. I really doubt the hive weight is a concern, rather the bulk would be more limiting.

    As far as smaller scales, Hiab hydraulic arms and forklifts, and hives on pallets are easy to work with.

    Dealing with honey supers by hand in the backyard with no mechanical advantage, I found pretty cumbersome. I went to medium supers, and found dealing with more, and smaller frames, easier, but less efficient for harvesting. Obviously picking up and moving an entire loaded hive, just isn't going to happen for most any backyard beekeeper.

    This winter I built a couple horizontal hives. Just 4' long, double walled, 1-1/2" styrofoam insulation in the walls, 1" in the roof, and 1" in the bottom. Will take 32 deep frames, and one has a raised roof so it can accommodate medium supers within it, making it 2 stories. All this is to deal with the weight.

    Being horizontal, I can go through the entire hive: expose and remove one frame at a time, inspect it, replace it, or shake the bees off and harvest it, replacing it with an empty frame. The two story hive, the medium supers are only for honey, put an escape board under them, or take them frame by frame. I will move these hives on occasion, and they're on legs to put them at a comfortable working height, and accommodate my hillside property. I have a small 4wd tractor and forks for the loader bucket. I'll be able to pick up the hive and move it just with the tractor, or put it on my flat deck trailer, and take them where ever I want.

    Little bit of hive design, little bit of mechanization, saves my back.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    oak harbor washington USA
    Posts
    77

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    You need to be more clear in your question.

    Are my hives to heavy on a pallet picked up on a forklift? NO
    Are my hives to heavy to be picked up by hand? Yes
    Are my medium supers full of honey to heavy for me? NO
    Are my medium supers full of honey to heavy for my wife? Yes
    Are medium supers full of honey heavy enough to cause back injury? Yes
    Would I like an affordable and easy way to move hives around the property? (over uneven ground and through mud) Yes

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    4,278

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    Quote Originally Posted by mbear View Post
    Would I like an affordable and easy way to move hives around the property? (over uneven ground and through mud) Yes
    Mbear, I suspect this motorized hand truck could be modified to be a rather efficient hive transport. I have used it for its intended purpose and it works very well.

    https://www.renaldo.org/propane/rtc420-tank-dollies/
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  17. #16
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    oak harbor washington USA
    Posts
    77

    Default Re: Engineering Project

    [QUOTE=JWPalmer;1777385]Mbear, I suspect this motorized hand truck could be modified to be a rather efficient hive transport. I have used it for its intended purpose and it works very well.


    Thank you. I am fortunate enough to own a tractor and this spring I will be moving all my hives on to half pallets so that I can use forks to move them. I suspect that most beekeepers do not own a tractor.

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