Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Lake County, Illinois
    Posts
    131

    Default Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    I have tried most mouse guards and would like some feed back on what you use for the winter, I want to have a parial closure of the entrance and also preclude mice from entering. The old fashioned wooden ones work but they can get pulled out by animals. I saw some metal ones that require screwing claps on both sides.I also like to have the bees have the ability to clean out dead bees rather than have them trapped at the bottom.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Red Bud, IL, USA
    Posts
    1,803

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    I use a fixed 4.5" entrance but same concept as an installed entrance reducer. Clipped the bottom of the metal to provide unobstructed entrance/exit on the BB. The screws in this pic allow the guard to be removed by simply loosening the screws but most are spaced where one of the screws must be completely removed.

    IMG_0491.jpg
    “The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” -George Bernard Shaw

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Lake County, Illinois
    Posts
    131

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    Very creative and simple/
    Quote Originally Posted by Eikel View Post
    I use a fixed 4.5" entrance but same concept as an installed entrance reducer. Clipped the bottom of the metal to provide unobstructed entrance/exit on the BB. The screws in this pic allow the guard to be removed by simply loosening the screws but most are spaced where one of the screws must be completely removed.

    IMG_0491.jpg

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Derry, New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,295

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    Quote Originally Posted by Eikel View Post
    I use a fixed 4.5" entrance but same concept as an installed entrance reducer. Clipped the bottom of the metal to provide unobstructed entrance/exit on the BB. The screws in this pic allow the guard to be removed by simply loosening the screws but most are spaced where one of the screws must be completely removed.

    IMG_0491.jpg
    what material did you use?
    Terrence

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Derry, New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,295

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    I use these. Found getting them to work required trimming the bottom board sides if they protruded further out then the box. I spray painted them when i got them. Not cheap but good quality. Nice when using an oav wand. The sides are screwed to the bottom box so doing things like reversing boxes in spring becomes a problem. Think i got mine on Ebay. I like that they can be reversed and used when moving hives or stopping a robbing event.
    Haven't had a mouse since. Got to put them on soon. Like now. Or make sure you double check you don't have any mice in there before you trap them in.
    For winter I run a top entrance as well. I don't show the bees will clean up dead in winter unless they have several warm days.

    https://www.amazon.com/Eastbuy-Beehi...%2C145&sr=8-11
    Terrence

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Red Bud, IL, USA
    Posts
    1,803

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    I get it from a local but it's like a 16 gauge mild steel with 1/4" holes. Even expanded metal will work; a pencil is a good go/no go gauge, if a pencil will fit through - so can a bee.
    “The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” -George Bernard Shaw

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Northern Colorado, USA
    Posts
    555

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    Quote Originally Posted by kaizen View Post
    I use these. Found getting them to work required trimming the bottom board sides if they protruded further out then the box. I spray painted them when i got them. Not cheap but good quality. Nice when using an oav wand. The sides are screwed to the bottom box so doing things like reversing boxes in spring becomes a problem. Think i got mine on Ebay. I like that they can be reversed and used when moving hives or stopping a robbing event.
    Haven't had a mouse since. Got to put them on soon. Like now. Or make sure you double check you don't have any mice in there before you trap them in.
    For winter I run a top entrance as well. I don't show the bees will clean up dead in winter unless they have several warm days.

    https://www.amazon.com/Eastbuy-Beehi...%2C145&sr=8-11
    Those are the same ones I like. I got a 3 pack for $11 a few months ago, but it is no longer available. I think the slots work better for the bees to clean the hive and I have put an entrance reducer behind the mouse guard or taped over some slots on smaller hives in the winter. I did have to trim them down with tin snips because they are a bit wide, but it only takes a minute. I got tired of messing with the brackets and just started driving 2 screws with a large flat under the head thru the holes in the top to hold them on.

    Here are the ones I got https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I use a screw like this to hold them on, anything with a flat flange under the head will probably work fine
    https://www.amazon.com/Rok-Hardware-...gateway&sr=8-7

    edit: I dont know why the listing for the mouse guard on amazon is messed up, but the picture is still right

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    I use a 1 1/2 X 14 1/2 in piece of 1/2 in hardware cloth ,folded in a V, and pushed in the gap,year round.Bees don't mind.
    For smaller hives or robbing situations,I nail a length of 1x1 on one side of the gap to reduce the width.
    The important thing is to allow the bees to bring out the dead but also provide enough height so that a layer of dead bees does not block the entrance

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    New Paltz, New York, USA
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    The hives I use have a permanently attached mouse guard and adjustable entrance reducer.

    90c2a7df2d1eb78e65752f7716032869f4c47f99.jpg

    It's handy but there are cheaper ways to accomplish the same thing.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Winchester, Wyoming
    Posts
    57

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    I like the way you think! memtb

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Nassau County, New York, USA
    Posts
    458

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    I buy metal strips with 3/8 inch holes from Home Depot. Cut the strips so that just 4 holes are left. Put that in the entrance and cover the rest of the entrance with wood and secure with screws.
    USDA Zone 7a - elevation 148 feet

  13. #12
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Vauxhall, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    287

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    Hello,

    I was looking for 1/2" mesh, but my hardware store only had roles of 50 yard, so no go. Then I found this
    2.jpg 2.jpg

    Applied with the fall/spring reducer like this and stapled to the reducer later, so it can be removed with the reducer for bottom board cleaning.
    7.jpg

    Cheers, Joerg
    Summ Summ Bienchen summ herum

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Shady Side, Maryland
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    I just drill a few 3/8 holes in a piece of corner bead. Remove the entrance reducer, screw it in place with one screw. One 10 foot piece of corner bead costs about $2 and will net you about 8 pieces.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Boston, MA, USA
    Posts
    253

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    a mouse can fit through a 1/2 in. hole. It would seem 1/2" mesh is to big.

    Alex

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Bath, Maine, United States
    Posts
    2,365

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Madsen View Post
    a mouse can fit through a 1/2 in. hole. It would seem 1/2" mesh is to big. Alex
    Disturbed a mouse out of an empty nuc, she ran full speed through the 3/8 gap and into another empty nuc with six good sized babies hanging onto her teats. Didn't even slow down.
    It is not true that you cannot teach an old dog new tricks.
    They can learn them, they just can't do them.

  17. #16
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,745

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Madsen View Post
    a mouse can fit through a 1/2 in. hole. It would seem 1/2" mesh is to big.

    Alex
    That depends quite a bit on the shape of the hole and the angle of it. If the 1/2" mesh is angled to the approach it gives decent assurance. I think Michael Palmer addressed this and folds the mesh into a sharp V that he wedges into the entrance.

    I have been using a 3/8 deep notch with a row of upright brads at about 5/16 - 3/8" spacing. Mouse proof but shrews could still squeeze through. They are not as plentiful as mice though.
    Frank

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    5,534

    Default Re: Mouse Guard and Entrance Reducer for Winter

    I use a wooden entrance reducer (small notch open, facing up). And a piece of 1/2" mesh hardware cloth bent at a right angle, attached over the entrance reducer with push pins on the face of the box and on the bottom board. Hardware cloth is slightly undersized so I can move it horizontally so that its wires and the edges of notch can be offset making the opening less than 1/2" wide. My bees primarily use their upper entrance during the winter (even if they are strongly bottom-entrance oriented during the summer.) It's so cold here most of the winter that they don't haul out the dead very often. Once a month, or so I remove the entrance reducers and use a stick to clear them out.

    I agree with Frank, shrews are smaller, though thankfully not as common as field/deer mice. However they eat brood so their effects are more troubling.

    Nancy

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •