Helping a hive that re-queened itself
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    North Barrington, IL
    Posts
    67

    Default Helping a hive that re-queened itself

    New hive from a package this past spring. The queen was a drone layer right from the beginning. They decided to re-queen themselves at the beginning of August. I took a peek yesterday and the new queen is doing really well. 5 full frames of capped brood and plenty of eggs and larva.

    I have some left over pollen patties. Would I be doing any harm if I put some in the hive?

    They are bringing in pollen on their own and the goldenrod is ready to pop.

    Also, I want to do a mite count but I really don't want to mess with the new population building going on. Should I wait, treat, ideas/suggestions?

    Thanks,

    Bob

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Helping a hive that re-queened itself

    There is no point adding patties when you have plenty of pollen coming. Put your leftovers in a plastic bag and store in a freezer till later this year or next spring.
    As for testing - if there are any mites majority will be under capped brood. If you have a screened bottom and see significant drop on to your sticky board every day (like more than 5) then do actual alcohol wash test and go from there.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Grand Rapids MI USA
    Posts
    1,464

    Default Re: Helping a hive that re-queened itself

    it sounds like the hive had a brood break which will help with the mites. But this time of year one always has to assume the worst as the bees are raising winter bees. I would go ahead and test, your not going to disrupt the colony that much.
    Rod

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    North Barrington, IL
    Posts
    67

    Default Re: Helping a hive that re-queened itself

    Thanks for the insights. Had problems logging in for some reason. Anyway...

    This package has had a higher percentage of drones than any other hive I have had/seen. When I checked in late July there was virtually no brood/eggs/larva. Plenty of stores. Also, a number of supercedure cells in various stages. I culled all but the nicest looking. I let them do their thing and when I checked the other day beautiful frames of capped brood with other brood in the works.
    A significantly less number of drones also.

    When they do a brood break, is there a complete lack of brood? Or just less brood. Also, they had plenty of capped and uncapped honey and pollen.

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