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Thread: Partridge Pea

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
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    1,163

    Default Re: Partridge Pea

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    I have not seen a bunch of yellow pollen coming into the hives. I have seen a little white which I think is probably chicory and some brown?.
    Cheers
    gww
    So I assumed the white pollen was boneset- but you may be right about it being chicory. We have a pretty even mix of dark orange and pale white pollen coming in here at the moment, with a little of a fawn brown pollen which may be the same as you are describing.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
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    4,012

    Default Re: Partridge Pea

    What do you think the orange is from? I have not seen bees on chicory this year but have seen white pollen. My bees are not coming in just loaded with anything, just a bee here and there. I do know that I watched the bees for the very first time last year hitting chicory and pollen baskets of white. I had not seen that the two years before and not this year and so took the working of chicory as a desperation type thing. I might not know what I am talking about though cause I really only watch things that are directly on my property that I can walk by. I do not know how reflective my property is in comparison of those around me. My neighbor cut my hay for twenty years with out much fertilizer being added. It kept the trees from growing in the fields. It should be getting a bit better now that it has bees on it and that I am leaving the cut stuff to "fertilize" for the last three years.

    It is defiantly different this year due to all the rain and maybe a change in mowing pattern. I see different stuff and different densities of old stuff.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
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    Boaz, KY, USA
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    Default Re: Partridge Pea

    Quote Originally Posted by gww View Post
    It is defiantly different this year due to all the rain and maybe a change in mowing pattern. I see different stuff and different densities of old stuff.
    Thanks, GWW. It does seem like this year (at least where I am at) has been different from the start. I can only speculate what the bright orange pollen is, but they have been working the last of the wingstem and sneezeweed and are also starting to work the beggar's ticks and flat-top goldenrod.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Northern Lower Michigan, USA
    Posts
    563

    Default Re: Partridge Pea

    Birds foot trefoil or Alfalfa both have deep roots and do well in dry times. the seed is expensive however. should be able to at a feed & seed store buy a little bag.Last 50 pound of trefoil I got was well over 100$ but 5 pounds for 12 or 15 bucks would be a good trial. the seeds are very small, need good soil contact. to get reseed you need to just let it go. they make little pods like Peas but smaller, they eventually pop open. I would put it in an old salt shaker and take it on Hikes, shake here shake there. Best fall flow I ever had was on an 80 Acre field of Sunflowers. If I did trefoil i would frost seed in the spring.
    GG

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
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    1,163

    Default Re: Partridge Pea

    This weekend I happened to catch both the Bombus and the Apis working the partridge pea.

    Based on what I observed over two days, it appears that the bumblebees will work the flowers for pollen early in the morning as the dew is burning off, and that the honey bees will work the nectar nodes early and late when the shadows are long. I never saw them working the flowers. Judging only on this small sample size I would assume the nectar dries up during the heat of the day and that honey bees don't routinely collect pollen from partridge pea.

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  7. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Rosebud Missouri
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    4,012

    Default Re: Partridge Pea

    Russ
    Nice. Good to know.
    Cheers
    gww
    zone 5b

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Algood, TN, USA
    Posts
    106

    Default Re: Partridge Pea

    We had partridge pea come up in a field next to our bees last year. The bees worked it so much I wouldn't let my husband bush hog the field until the flowers were gone. We pull our honey last of June/first of July and these flower after that so I don't know how the honey would be.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Lake Forest Park, WA
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: Partridge Pea

    deleted (responded to an older post)
    Zone 8, elevation 70 ft, near the north end of Lake Washington

  10. #29

    Default Re: Partridge Pea

    Honey Plants of North America (1926):

    "Partridge-pea is a herbaceous, much branched, spreading annual with pinnate leaves, and showy yellow flowers which often have the petals purple-spotted at base. It extends from Maine to Florida and westward to Indiana and Texas, but it is valuable as a honey plant chiefly in Florida and Georgia. In the north-central part of Florida there are thousands of acres in bloom during July and August, and for miles the ground is covered with a yellow carpet of flowers. It is also common in Georgia: in many dry sandy sections of the South, indeed, it is the main dependence of the beekeeper, making beekeeping possible in otherwise very unfavorable localities.

    (....)From one to three supers, or 100 pounds of honey per colony, have been obtained from partridge-pea. The honey is medium light amber, exceptionally thin, with a poor flavor. At Fort White, Florida, the surplus comes from partridge-pea and chinquapin. Inferior as is the flavor of this honey, its fine appearance has caused it to sell at a high price. The extracted honey is bought by bakers and the large quantity obtained partly atones for the poor quality."

    Plants Honey Bees Use in the Ohio and Tennessee Valleys (2018):

    "Partridge pea is a native, self-seeding annual. It is often planted for erosion control, wildlife conservation, or native wildflower gardens. It has bright yellow flowers with contrasting red-brown stamens. Partridge peas are highly attractive to many insect pollinators including honey bees. However, honey bees do not collect nectar from the flowers. The partridge pea nectar honey bees collect comes from extrafloral nectaries located at the base of the leaves. The seed pods produced by partridge pea are a valuable food source for wildlife, especially bobwhites.

    Partridge pea is an important plant for honey bees in NC and VA. It may have some local importance in other parts of the region. Even within the same state, some beekeepers consider it an important plant for honey bees, while beekeepers in other parts of the state report their bees pay little attention to partridge pea. Partridge peas's importance for honey bees likely varies based on factors like soil type, soil moisture, and the availability of other plants."

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
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    1,163

    Default

    RockChucker:

    Great post- I appreciate the information.

    Looks like it might also be your first post here on Beesource? If so, let me be the first to welcome you to the forum. Glad to have you a part of our community.

    Thanks again for the information- good stuff.

    Russ

  12. #31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Litsinger View Post
    RockChucker:

    Great post- I appreciate the information.

    Looks like it might also be your first post here on Beesource? If so, let me be the first to welcome you to the forum. Glad to have you a part of our community.

    Thanks again for the information- good stuff.

    Russ
    No problem, and thanks for the welcome. I like books, and multiple sources at that. Everyone has their own take and it changes through history. We can learn from all of it.

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