modified taranov split
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Syracuse, UT
    Posts
    201

    Default modified taranov split

    I'm thinking of doing the following next year. Tell me where I may go wrong:

    1. Set up hive boxes for new hive in the location it will be at.
    2. Take the boxes from a hive that I'm going to split and stack them in reverse order that they were in next to new hive location.
    3. Take the top box in the stack and place on new hive.
    4. put an empty box (no frames) on the top of the box I just placed on the new hive.
    5. Put a fume board on top of the empty box and drive the bees out of the box that I put on the new hive down into the new hives lower boxes.
    6. Take the empty box and the box that was just vacated of bees off of the new hive and put the vacated box back in its original place (bottom of old hive).
    7. Repeat for all boxes in the stack.

    When done, I should have all the bees from the old hive in the new hive including the queen. The old hive will be back in it's original order and just have capped brood and foraging bees that have returned. I expect foraging bees that went into the new hive from this process to leave the new hive and fly back to the old hive. End result would be a new hive with queen and non-foraging young nurse bees and the old hive with old foraging bees and brood that they can make a new queen from. Same result as a Taranov split if it works but without all the shaking of bees everywhere. Think it will work? I may have to block escape entrances of the new hive during the process so that the fume board will not drive the queen and nurse bees out of the new hive. I would probably put a couple of frames of honey in the new hive to try to keep them there. Would wait a few minutes after the last time of using the fume board to open the entrance. Would use a screened bottom board on new hive most likely.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,897

    Default Re: modified taranov split

    The old hive will be back in it's original order and just have capped brood and foraging bees that have returned. I expect foraging bees that went into the new hive from this process to leave the new hive and fly back to the old hive.
    This is just a variation of cut-back/fly-back split, not a "modified Taranov split".

    The Taranov split (and its variations) is an emergency split where you are already in a swarming mode and can not stop it.
    So, you make them "swarm" on your own terms and get to keep the actual pending swarm (not loose it).
    Taranov's method's ingenious key point - physical separation of the pending swarm bees from the stay-at-home bees.

    Do you see how you method is NOT a Taranov's split?
    You proposing a variation of a planned split (Taranov's split is never a planned split, it is an emergency split that is done on the spot to prevent loosing a swarm).
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,733

    Default Re: modified taranov split

    Ditch the whole fume board idea. There are much easier ways to accomplish the same thing without all the monkey motions. And, I am not sure why you want to do the equivalent of a flyback split, but not provide the returning foragers with the mated queen. They are not as equipped to produce a new queen from a frame of eggs as are the nurse bees you so tediously removed. Read up on flyback splits and follow the instructions, that is, no "modifications". You will get excellent results.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Houston, TX, USA
    Posts
    646

    Default Re: modified taranov split

    GregV, such absolutes - I thought you had been keeping bees for more than a week... I agree what the OP describes is not a Taranov.

    When I had a very small yard I used the Taranov process to do splits. Now that I have the space other methods are faster and easier. If a keeper has trouble finding queens, the Taranov is pretty foolproof.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,743

    Default Re: modified taranov split

    Quote Originally Posted by texanbelchers View Post
    GregV, such absolutes - I thought you had been keeping bees for more than a week... I agree what the OP describes is not a Taranov.

    When I had a very small yard I used the Taranov process to do splits. Now that I have the space other methods are faster and easier. If a keeper has trouble finding queens, the Taranov is pretty foolproof.

    I have the same problem with finding my dark queens and have used the Taranov to do a sort of bees to put above a Snelgrove double screen board for queen rearing. Not an emergency swarm killer.

    Yesterday I shook bees that were building cells just to ensure I had one group with the queen and young bees and the started cells to put in one split and sort the bare frames to put in the other box. It accomplished about the same as a taranov procedure would have done but in a fraction of the time. Not a typical Taranov, not a pure Snelgrove Method 2 and not totally a fly away split. I will have to check back in a few days to see if the queen is indeed where I intended her to be. Being that cell construction was a bit ambiguous about whether supercedure or swarm preps, I grabbed something I knew would work for me.

    What the original poster suggested would work but seems like a bit of dancing around. More than one way to skin a cat. It is all good!
    Frank

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,897

    Default Re: modified taranov split

    Quote Originally Posted by texanbelchers View Post
    GregV, such absolutes - I thought you had been keeping bees for more than a week... I agree what the OP describes is not a Taranov.

    When I had a very small yard I used the Taranov process to do splits. Now that I have the space other methods are faster and easier. If a keeper has trouble finding queens, the Taranov is pretty foolproof.
    Well, Taranov had a very specific problem to solve and he did it the way he did at about 1947.
    That is the Taranov artificial swarm.
    No more and no less.

    I would avoid this mess if I can help it as unnecessary.
    20190622_200744.jpg
    Did something similar this year due to the pending swarm - an urgent on-the-spot project since I could loose a swarm virtually tomorrow, not good (happy with the end result).
    In the process the original queen got lost or damaged (always a risk when shaking).
    I guess, I got a queen replaced that way and kept my bees too (they put up good honey).

    Otherwise, fly-back/cut-back splitting is a good way to do - predictable and easy and gets you what you need.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma District Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,743

    Default Re: modified taranov split

    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    Well, Taranov had a very specific problem to solve and he did it the way he did at about 1947.
    That is the Taranov artificial swarm.
    No more and no less.

    I would avoid this mess if I can help it as unnecessary.
    20190622_200744.jpg
    Did something similar this year due to the pending swarm - an urgent on-the-spot project since I could loose a swarm virtually tomorrow, not good (happy with the end result).
    In the process the original queen got lost or damaged (always a risk when shaking).
    .
    I see another possibility that the queen was already gone before you started the shake. In any case, how one goes about doing the shaking can alter the degree of risk to her. I act differently when I am trying to catch to eliminate rather than to catch to keep.

    I can understand someones perception of "absolute decrees"!
    Frank

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,897

    Default Re: modified taranov split

    Quote Originally Posted by crofter View Post
    I see another possibility that the queen was already gone before you started the shake. In any case, how one goes about doing the shaking can alter the degree of risk to her. I act differently when I am trying to catch to eliminate rather than to catch to keep.

    I can understand someones perception of "absolute decrees"!
    Based on the number of unhatched yet swarm cells AND volume of the bees - no swarm was issued yet but was pending soon.
    Pretty sure the old queen was still somewhere in that hive ready to jump the ship.
    Well, a couple of days after the being dumped out as in Taranov AND all the brood frames taken away too, for a good measure - the bees attempted an emergency QCs on the few missed brood patches - good enough indication that the old queen is no more.

    What changed?
    Well, I dumped them onto the tarp as prescribed and even left them outside on the tarp in the rainy night to sort things out.
    In the end, the old queen was no more.

    Anyways, it all worked out almost as prescribed.
    I am getting good honey crop from these particular guys.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Bath, Maine, United States
    Posts
    2,365

    Default Re: modified taranov split

    People, I am very disappointed in you all . Not one argument broke out about the proper way to do a flyback and so many opportunities.

    The queen stays with the old hive to do her good work. Nurse bees and one or two brood frames from the hive you want as stock (Does not need to be from your split hive).
    It is not true that you cannot teach an old dog new tricks.
    They can learn them, they just can't do them.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,897

    Default Re: modified taranov split

    Quote Originally Posted by Saltybee View Post
    People, I am very disappointed in you all . Not one argument broke out about the proper way to do a flyback and so many opportunities.

    The queen stays with the old hive to do her good work. Nurse bees and one or two brood frames from the hive you want as stock (Does not need to be from your split hive).
    Once the correction is made about the actual procedure in hand, the person (IF really interested) can study the splitting at their own pace.
    BS is full of splitting instructions (fly-back is very well documented - I re-read the narration from Lauri probably 10-20 times - they are great).
    Why rehash the same the N-th time; and the multiple repeats only make finding the good stuff really really hard.
    We are all fully capable adults here.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,733

    Default Re: modified taranov split

    Salty, I alluded to the proper way when asking why the mated queen was not staying with the foragers. I also suggested the OP read up on fly backs. Lauri's explanation is the definitive guide and anyone not familiar with this type of split should read what she has to say.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •