Drone capturing device.
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1

    Default Drone capturing device.

    I have been offered a drone capturing device. For 200 dollars. Maker said that it will increase honey production as drones will not eat the honey. It captures the drones but leaves workers and queens. Is it worth cash? what could go wrong?

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    1,372

    Default Re: Drone capturing device.

    You don't say what exactly this 'device' consists of - but 'drone traps' have been around since the 1850's, and have never caught on.

    An unusual subject for a first post - are you the manufacturer ?
    LJ
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Aylett, Virginia
    Posts
    3,565

    Default Re: Drone capturing device.

    Good call LJ. I do not need to capture drones unless I start doing II. In the meantime, a queen excluder does a pretty good job of keeping the drones from eating my harvestable honey, and they only cost about $5.
    Thankfully, the bees are smarter than I am. They are doing well, in spite of my efforts to help them.

  5. #4

    Default Re: Drone capturing device.

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    You don't say what exactly this 'device' consists of - but 'drone traps' have been around since the 1850's, and have never caught on.

    An unusual subject for a first post - are you the manufacturer ?
    LJ
    I am an inventor. I want to produce a device that zaps drones with a laser beam. And would be portable between hives.
    I am just researching the market...
    do you think it would be useful?

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    8,091

    Default Re: Drone capturing device.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kanistra View Post
    I I am just researching the market...
    do you think it would be useful?
    No

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    1,372

    Default Re: Drone capturing device.

    Thanks for your honesty.

    Useful ? I doubt it, as there are other - much cheaper - ways of eliminating drones for those who want to do this. Perhaps the most useful of these is to place drone combs in a hive, and then remove them, the drones, and lots of Varroa mites at the same time.

    With Varroa in mind - if you could figure out a way of zapping these with a laser, you'd make a fortune ... even if it was only partially effective.

    But - that would be a tough project to pull off, as the little beggars (the phoretic mites) are almost completely hidden.

    But - good luck
    LJ

    MP: a man of few words ... LOL
    A Heretics Guide to Beekeeping http://heretics-guide.atwebpages.com/

  8. #7

    Default Re: Drone capturing device.

    Quote Originally Posted by little_john View Post
    With Varroa in mind - if you could figure out a way of zapping these with a laser, you'd make a fortune ... even if it was only partially effective.
    Thanks for the info I think it is possible to hunt for mites too.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    NW Piedmont NC
    Posts
    26

    Default Re: Drone capturing device.

    Being able to distinguish SHB and zapping upon entering the hive would be the cats meow.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,623

    Default Re: Drone capturing device.

    There are a lot of research papers on the advantages of having drones. Page and Metcalf did one that showed that colonies with more drones make more honey. Keith Delaplane writes about it in ABJ Oct 2017 pg 1095. There are papers that show that drones help provide heat for the brood nest. I want as many drones as the bees think they need.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    ElDorado,Arkansas,USA
    Posts
    1,574

    Default Re: Drone capturing device.

    I bought a drone trap about 40 years ago when I first started my own hives.New at the time it sounded like a good idea.Dont know why but thats how fools get separated from their money!!!
    drone trap.jpg

    The trap was kind of like a dog catching his own tail.Once I caught the drones what was I going to do with them???

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,623

    Default Re: Drone capturing device.

    “...in the presence of male bees, the organism of workers works more effectively, i.e. it utilizes in a better way the components contained in food. It must be stressed that next to the high survival rate in the worker bees consuming carbohydrate food, there occurred also a better development of the pharyngeal glands where protein is particularly necessary. The presence of drones had also a positive effect on the content of total protein and crude
    fat in the bodies of worker bees consuming sugar candy.”* This study may change the minds of some beekeepers concerning the value of drones in a colony; their removal may not be as benign as once thought. “
    Sanford, M.T. 2002, "Apimondia in South Africa," Bee Culture, Vol. 130 (seven installments: January, February, March, May, July, August, September).

    Drone studies:

    This study says they also help heat brood:
    http://link.springer.com/article/10....0694379#page-1
    This one says the colony is more productive with adequate drones and drone comb:
    http://aesa.oxfordjournals.org/content/64/4/954
    This one says that there was no significant loss of production in colonies with more drones and drone comb:
    http://aesa.oxfordjournals.org/content/64/4/954


    Drones get a bad rap. They leave the hive every afternoon and fly until they are exhausted. Their lives are just as short because they work just as hard as the foragers. The only downside for the hive is that they don't produce honey, but they do work at perpetuating the species at great cost to themselves, even if they don't succeed and greater if they do.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •