Beginner Question (Emergency...maybe?) - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Dane County, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,663

    Default Re: Beginner Question (Emergency...maybe?)

    Quote Originally Posted by hal4287 View Post
    Thank you for your response. It was not my intention to save the bees. If anything, as a wildlife biologist, I wouldnít want to save European honeybees but put efforts towards native bees first.

    I donít think I am alone when I say that tending bees is cathartic for many beekeepers.
    Thanks for clarifying.
    Myself, I do the bees for the mental therapeutic side-effect of the activities associated with it (well, most any hobby does the same).
    The self-sustenance food production is another reason.

    Good luck.
    Former "smoker boy". Classic, square 12 frame Dadants >> Long hive/Short frame/chemical-free experimentations.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    2,077

    Default Re: Beginner Question (Emergency...maybe?)

    Put your entrance reducer back on, when there is a dearth of nectar robbing hits high gear. my bees are in sun, all entrances are reduced almost all year here. I do have screened bottom boards so I can remove the sticky to ventilate, and I make my own hive top feeders with a screen 3 inch opening for a feed jar, that allows ventilation safely. Wide open entrance is formula for trouble.

    Robbing: fighting on porch. large number of bees hovering looking at your hive before they all try to enter at once. Makes bees more aggressive.
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Boaz, KY, USA
    Posts
    1,071

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hal4287 View Post
    I don’t think I am alone when I say that tending bees is cathartic for many beekeepers.
    Hal:

    While I will concur that EHB's are not pets (nor even livestock in the technical sense), I like you find enjoyment in studying/watching bees for no other benefit than learning more about their behavior and social structure. They truly are amazing creatures up close.

    One thing that has been helpful to me is that you personally get to answer the 'why' you keep bees- and if you are satisfied with the approach and the results, that is a good enough reason to keep doing it.

    I sincerely wish you all the best of success in your beekeeping adventure, and please don't hesitate to ask for help and advice on here (and locally for that matter). There are a lot of very good beekeepers (several of who have already responded to you) on here who are very generous with their time and experience.

    Russ

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Beginner Question (Emergency...maybe?)

    Quote Originally Posted by Gypsi View Post
    Put your entrance reducer back on, when there is a dearth of nectar robbing hits high gear. my bees are in sun, all entrances are reduced almost all year here. I do have screened bottom boards so I can remove the sticky to ventilate, and I make my own hive top feeders with a screen 3 inch opening for a feed jar, that allows ventilation safely. Wide open entrance is formula for trouble.

    Robbing: fighting on porch. large number of bees hovering looking at your hive before they all try to enter at once. Makes bees more aggressive.
    Entrance reducer is back on! I checked the hive today and they are still pretty aggressive. I could not find the queen I previously put in there! I video taped the inspection and go through frame by frame. Lots of larvae and a bit eggs. There is a good chance I missed her....or maybe that's why the hive is suddenly aggressive? The video is long and boring but you get to hear me scream like a sissy when one gets up my pants leg. Link to video is: https://www.dropbox.com/s/0wnb3vul1m...e%201.mp4?dl=0

    Hal

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    2,077

    Default Re: Beginner Question (Emergency...maybe?)

    Hal, I wear almost knee high boots with my suit tucked in. For future reference. I can't find my hot queen either, I split her hive 3 ways, the bees say she is in the yellow box so I took all her eggs and brood and if anymore shows up, I'll know she is there. She has 2 frames of honey/nectar and 3 empty frames of comb
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    2,077

    Default Re: Beginner Question (Emergency...maybe?)

    I watched your video. It was long. boots you will find some I am sure. That was a really long inspection, bees don't look that hot, they acted like the queen was on frame 3. I use taller hive stands, and I have a small hive size table the same height as my hive stand to make it easier to pull a box off and inspect the one underneath, saves lifting and discourages skunks, who can eat a hive's bees in 3 or 4 days. That will also make a hive hot.

    Let the bees be for now. They've got 10 frames to fill - that nectar is syrup, keep them fed, but wherever she is she is laying, the more inspect, more likely you will lose the queen. if they haven't filled that 10 frame by the time temps drop, have a couple of nuc boxes with bottom and top you can stack for a winter hive, they will survive better.

    I would consider getting them 16 inches up and putting a board or a piece of pond liner or something under the blocks so you don't have grass growing up in hive and don't have to mow or edge too near it.
    Stuck in Texas. Learning Permaculture in drought, flood and strange weather. The bees are still alive.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gypsi View Post
    I watched your video. It was long. boots you will find some I am sure. That was a really long inspection, bees don't look that hot, they acted like the queen was on frame 3. I use taller hive stands, and I have a small hive size table the same height as my hive stand to make it easier to pull a box off and inspect the one underneath, saves lifting and discourages skunks, who can eat a hive's bees in 3 or 4 days. That will also make a hive hot.

    Let the bees be for now. They've got 10 frames to fill - that nectar is syrup, keep them fed, but wherever she is she is laying, the more inspect, more likely you will lose the queen. if they haven't filled that 10 frame by the time temps drop, have a couple of nuc boxes with bottom and top you can stack for a winter hive, they will survive better.

    I would consider getting them 16 inches up and putting a board or a piece of pond liner or something under the blocks so you don't have grass growing up in hive and don't have to mow or edge too near it.
    Thank you for the advice! I had been thinking of getting them up higher for my own sake. I am too tall and the position is uncomfortable.

    I will try to get quicker with my inspections. Working in gloves is really tough for me but I’m sure I will get used to it. I will leave them alone for now and keep them fed. Thanks again for taking the time with me.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    frederick, md
    Posts
    810

    Default Re: Beginner Question (Emergency...maybe?)

    Quote Originally Posted by hal4287 View Post
    Working in gloves is really tough for me but I’m sure I will get used to it. Thanks again for taking the time with me.
    Try vinyl gloves, I use them exclusively, unless we are moving hives. Makes it real easy to feel the frames and pull them out. Also use the hook hive tool, for me easier to pull the frames out.

    I do get stung now and then through them, mainly when I don't know I have a bee in my hand and squeeze it.
    Zone 6b: 18 hives in Maryland, Carniolan, Italian mix mutts: Still learning - started bees spring of 2014.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Beginner Question (Emergency...maybe?)

    Get some #8 hardware cloth, cut a 4Ē strip long enough to span the width of the hive entrance, then cut 4 slits in one long side about halfway through. Staple it along the upper(uncut) side so it covers the entrance. Fold one of the lower segments upward. Now you can vary how much entrance room there is, but not impede ventilation.
    Iím not so certain the aggressiveness was due to lack of resources. Defensive bees become moreso as the colony expands. A hive with defenders that range out 30-40 feet and carry out unprovoked attacks suggest genetics that are useful when marauding animals around. Ditto when defenders follow you at great distance. If behaviour doesnt improve by feeding, consider splitting hive. By the time each split growsto a point where aggressiveness would recur, old aggressive bees should have died out.
    Had a BIG nasty hive. Split it into 2 double deeps, two 5 frame and two 2 frame nucs. Immediately calmed down. 3 days later, looked for eggs, located/killed queen, requeened the 2 framers. Combined each 2 with a five a week later, and then these colonies with the deeps a week therafter. Worked out nicely.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Hot Springs, AR, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Beginner Question (Emergency...maybe?)

    Quote Originally Posted by Fusion_power View Post
    He is in a dearth that will continue until about the 2nd week of August.

    It is almost 100% guaranteed they raised a queen that had emerged by the 14th day. Bees with a virgin queen will often do strange things such as appear to be swarming while she is on a mating flight. It does not matter if there is an old queen in the hive, the virgin will still fly out to mate and eventually the old queen will disappear.

    There is another possibility which is that the new colony could be getting robbed. Aggressiveness is typical when a small colony is attacked. This would also explain the bee in your wife's hair. It would be worth a bit of time to ensure this is not robbing!
    How did they raise a queen from capped brood?

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